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On interpretation and task selection: the sub-component hypothesis of cognitive noise effects
University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering. (Miljöpsykologi)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-7584-2275
2015 (English)In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 5, 1598Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

It is often argued that the effects of noise on a “complex ability” (e.g., reading, writing, calculation) can be explained by the impairment noise causes to some ability (e.g., working memory) upon which the complex ability depends. Because of this, tasks that measure “sub-component abilities” (i.e., those abilities upon which complex abilities depend) are often deemed sufficient in cognitive noise studies, even when the primary interest is to understand the effects of noise as they arise in applied settings (e.g., offices and schools). This approach can be called the “sub-component hypothesis of cognitive noise effects.” The present paper discusses two things that are troublesome for this approach: difficulties with interpretation and generalizability. A complete understanding of the effects of noise on complex abilities requires studying the complex ability itself. Cognitive noise researches must, therefore, employ tasks that mimic the tasks that are actually carried out in the applied setting to which the results are intended to be generalized.Tasks that measure “sub-component abilities” may be complementary, but should not be given priority in applied cognitive research.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 5, 1598
Keyword [en]
noise, cognition, task selection, interpretation, attentional capture, process impurity
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-18653DOI: 10.3389/fpsyg.2014.01598ISI: 000348185400001PubMedID: 25642207Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84947201025OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hig-18653DiVA: diva2:775315
Available from: 2015-01-01 Created: 2015-01-01 Last updated: 2015-12-04Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard-cite-them-right
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • sv-SE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
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  • nn-NB
  • de-DE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
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  • asciidoc
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