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Effects of concurrent physical and cognitive demands on muscle activity and heart rate variability in a repetitive upper-extremity precision task
University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research. University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-9327-6177
University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research. University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1443-6211
University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research. University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-2741-1868
SMI, Department of Health Science and Technology, Aalborg University, Denmark.
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2016 (English)In: European Journal of Applied Physiology, ISSN 1439-6319, E-ISSN 1439-6327, Vol. 116, no 1, 227-239 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose Most previous studies of concurrent physical and cognitive demands have addressed tasks of limited relevance to occupational work, and with dissociated physical and cognitive task components. This study investigated effects on muscle activity and heart rate variability of executing a repetitive occupational task with an added cognitive demand integral to correct task performance.

Methods Thirty-five healthy females performed 7.5 min of standardized repetitive pipetting work in a baseline condition and a concurrent cognitive condition involving a complex instruction for correct performance. Average levels and variabilities of electromyographic activities in the upper trapezius and extensor carpi radialis (ECR) muscles were compared between these two conditions. Heart rate and heart rate variability were also assessed to measure autonomic nervous system activation. Subjects also rated perceived fatigue in the neck–shoulder region, as well as exertion.

Results Concurrent cognitive demands increased trapezius muscle activity from 8.2 % of maximum voluntary exertion (MVE) in baseline to 9.0 % MVE (p = 0.0005), but did not significantly affect ECR muscle activity, heart rate, heart rate variability, perceived fatigue or exertion.

Conclusion Trapezius muscle activity increased by about 10 %, without any accompanying cardiovascular response to indicate increased sympathetic activation. We suggest this slight increase in trapezius muscle activity to be due to changed muscle activation patterns within or among shoulder muscles. The results suggest that it may be possible to introduce modest cognitive demands necessary for correct performance in repetitive precision work without any major physiological effects, at least in the short term.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2016. Vol. 116, no 1, 227-239 p.
Keyword [en]
Mental demands, cycle to cycle variability, entropy, pipetting, autonomic nervous system
National Category
Environmental Health and Occupational Health
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-19400DOI: 10.1007/s00421-015-3268-8ISI: 000367610200022PubMedID: 26403235ScopusID: 2-s2.0-84952984643OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hig-19400DiVA: diva2:814689
Projects
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Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2009-1761Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2011-0075
Available from: 2015-05-28 Created: 2015-05-28 Last updated: 2016-11-10Bibliographically approved

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Srinivasan, DivyaMathiassen, Svend ErikHallman, David M.Lyskov, Eugene
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