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Central/cognitive load modulates peripheral/perceptual processing
University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering. Linnaeus Centre HEAD, Linköping University, Sweden. (Miljöpsykologi)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-7584-2275
Linnaeus Centre HEAD, Linköping University, Sweden.
Linnaeus Centre HEAD, Linköping University, Sweden.
Linnaeus Centre HEAD, Linköping University, Sweden; Technical Audiology, Linköping University, Sweden.
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2015 (English)In: Abstract book: Third International Conference on Cognitive Hearing Science for Communication 14–17 June 2015 Linköping, Sweden / [ed] Maria Hugo-Lindén, 2015, 62-62 p.Conference paper, Abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

A long lasting debate in selective attention research revolves around the issue of whether irrelevant information is filtered at an early/perceptual processing stage or at a late/cognitive processing stage. Another long lasting debate concerns whether selective attention depends on a single, multi-purpose processing resource or whether it depends on several, independent processing resources. As a reaction to both debates, we have proposed a unified view of attention (Sörqvist, Stenfelt, & Rönnberg, 2012) whereby central/cognitive load modulates peripheral/perceptual processing. Moreover, the unified view of attention embodies a domain-general processing resource – called working memory capacity – that determines people’s capability for attentional/cognitive engagement. Here, we will present data from a recent experiment designed to critically examine this model. Participants undertook a visual-verbal version of the n-back task in various taskdifficulty conditions. Cortical processing of a background sound was measured with an fMRI protocol and individual differences in working memory capacity were measured with a package of three complex-span tasks. Our hypothesis is that higher task difficulty (in the n-back task) will be associated with increased prefrontal cortical activity and decreased auditory-temporal activity. Moreover, the magnitude of this effect should be related to individual differences in working memory capacity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. 62-62 p.
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-19663OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hig-19663DiVA: diva2:821768
Conference
Cognitive Hearing Science for Communication (CHSCOM 2015), 14-17 June 2015, Linköping, Sweden
Available from: 2015-06-15 Created: 2015-06-15 Last updated: 2015-10-30Bibliographically approved

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Sörqvist, Patrik
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Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering
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