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Musculoskeletal pain and limitations in work ability in Swedish marines: a cross-sectional survey of prevalence and associated factors
Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Physiotherapy, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Stockholm ; Swedish Armed Forces, Regional Medical Service Mälardalen, Berga.
Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Physiotherapy, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Stockholm ; Swedish Armed Forces, HR Centre, Stockholm.
University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
Department of Medical Engineering, School of Technology and Health, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Huddinge.
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2015 (English)In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 5, no 10, e007943Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives To estimate the prevalence of self-rated musculoskeletal pain and pain limiting work ability in Swedish Armed Forces (SAF) marines, and to study factors potentially associated with pain limiting work ability for the most prevalent pain regions reported.

Design Population-based, cross-sectional survey.

Participants There were 272 SAF marines from the main marine battalion in Sweden included in the study.

Outcomes Self-assessed musculoskeletal pain and pain limiting the marines' work ability within a 6-month period, as obtained from structured questionnaires. The association of individual, health and work-related factors with musculoskeletal pain limiting work ability was systematically regressed with multiple logistic models, estimating OR and 95% CI.

Results Musculoskeletal pain and pain limiting work ability were most common in the back, at 46% and 20%, and lower extremities at 51% and 29%, respectively. Physical training ≤1 day/week (OR 5.3, 95% CI 1.7 to 16.8); body height ≤1.80 m (OR 5.0, 95% CI 1.6 to 15.1) and ≥1.86 m (OR 4.4, 95% CI 1.4 to 14.1); computer work 1/4 of the working day (OR 3.2, 95% CI 1.0 to 10.0) and ≥1/2 (OR 3.3, 95% CI 1.1 to 10.1) of the working day were independently associated with back pain limiting work ability. None of the studied variables emerged significantly associated with such pain for the lower extremities.

Conclusions Our findings show that musculoskeletal pain and resultant limitations in work ability are common in SAF marines. Low frequency of physical training emerged independently associated with back pain limiting work ability. This suggests that marines performing physical training 1 day per week or less are suitable candidates for further medical evaluation and secondary preventive actions. While also associated, body height and computer work need further exploration as underlying mechanisms for back pain limiting work ability. Further prospective studies are necessary to clarify the direction of causality.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 5, no 10, e007943
Keyword [en]
Musculoskeletal pain, prevalence, self-assessment, pain limiting work ability, marines, Sweden, cross-sectional survey
National Category
Environmental Health and Occupational Health
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-20404DOI: 10.1136/bmjopen-2015-007943ISI: 000365467600021PubMedID: 26443649ScopusID: 2-s2.0-84945945330OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hig-20404DiVA: diva2:859487
Note

Finansierat av:

- 1st Marine Regiment, Swedish Armed Forces, the Swedish Armed Forces PhD Programme

- Swedish Society for Military Medical Officers

Available from: 2015-10-07 Created: 2015-10-07 Last updated: 2016-01-11Bibliographically approved

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