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Blended work as a bridge between traditional workplace employment and retirement: a conceptual review
Department of Department of Occupational Medicine, Epidemiology, and Prevention, Hofstra North Shore-LIJ School of Medicine, USA.
Department of Occupational Medicine, Epidemiology, and Prevention, Hofstra North Shore-LIJ School of Medicine, USA.
Department of Occupational Medicine, Epidemiology, and Prevention, Hofstra North Shore-LIJ School of Medicine, USA.
University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research. University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science.
2016 (English)In: Work, Aging and Retirement, ISSN 2054-4642, E-ISSN 2054-4650, Vol. 2, no 4, 373-383 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Because of population aging, the consensus among policy makers is that employment in older workers must increase. However, methods for attaining this are uncertain. Blended work, which consists of working anywhere and any-time with information and communication technology, may help achieve this goal. The article focuses on 4 top-ics related to older workers and blended work: the benefits, risks, individual- and organizational-level barriers, and organizational and government interventions and policies designed to remove these risks and barriers. Legislation to protect against age discrimination and disability associated with age is also reviewed. The objectives are to dis-cuss the literature on blended work and the older worker and highlight some consequences the Age Discrimination in Employment Act and American with Disabilities Act may have on blended work. Delaying retirement through blended work could promote older workers’ health and well-being, but risks and barriers at individual- and organi-zational-levels are not inconsequential. At the individual level, these include social isolation, and managements’ loss of control over employees at the organizational level. Potential interventions include developing blended work as an employee benefit to replace long distance travel. Federal policies include providing subsidies to state and local gov-ernments to reduce costs of upgrading broadband fiber-optic cables. Specific subgroups of workers are more likely to benefit from blended work. Older white collar professionals with good technological and computer skills and who can work independently are one subgroup that might fit a blended worker personality.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 2, no 4, 373-383 p.
Keyword [en]
blended work, workers, older workers, interventions, workplace employment, retirement
National Category
Environmental Health and Occupational Health
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-20866DOI: 10.1093/workar/waw017ISI: 000385363400001OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hig-20866DiVA: diva2:882427
Available from: 2015-12-14 Created: 2015-12-14 Last updated: 2017-01-11Bibliographically approved

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