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Social desirability does not underpin the eco-label effect on product judgments
University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering. (Miljöpsykologi)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-7584-2275
University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology.
University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering. School of Psychology, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, U.K. (Miljöpsykologi)
2016 (English)In: Food Quality and Preference, ISSN 0950-3293, E-ISSN 1873-6343, Vol. 50, 82-87 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

What reason underpins why people say they prefer eco-labeled over conventional products during direct perceptual comparison? One possibility is that there is no difference in the perceptual experience of the products; the participants just say there is because they wish to gain other’s approval. In this paper, we tested this social desirability account of the eco-label effect by requesting participants to judge grapes that were in truth identical but labeled “eco-friendly” and “conventional” respectively. The eco-label effects were similar in magnitude for an impression management condition (participants were told that their responses were monitored) and a no-instructions control condition, but greater in a moral-instructions condition (the participants were told, amongst other things, that conventional agriculture is harmful). The experiment suggests that people do not say that they prefer eco-labeled products because they seek other’s approval. Social motives may underpin reasons to purchase “green” products at the grocery store, but social motives are not the direct cause of the eco-label effect on the perceptual experience of the products.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 50, 82-87 p.
Keyword [en]
Eco-label effect, Taste, Social desirability, Impression management, Perceptual experience
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-21113DOI: 10.1016/j.foodqual.2016.01.010ISI: 000372767300010ScopusID: 2-s2.0-84955561469OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hig-21113DiVA: diva2:897956
Available from: 2016-01-26 Created: 2016-01-26 Last updated: 2016-04-29Bibliographically approved

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Sörqvist, PatrikLangeborg, LindaMarsh, John E.
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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
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  • nn-NB
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  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
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