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Gender differences in muscle activity responses and fatigability to a short-cycle repetitive task
University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research. Grado Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, United States.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-9327-6177
McGill University, Montreal, Canada; CRIR Research Centre, Jewish Rehabilitation Hospital, Laval, Canada.
University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1443-6211
McGill University, Montreal, Canada; CRIR Research Centre, Jewish Rehabilitation Hospital, Laval, Canada.
2016 (English)In: European Journal of Applied Physiology, ISSN 1439-6319, E-ISSN 1439-6327, Vol. 116, no 11-12, p. 2357-2365Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: Epidemiological research has identified women to be more susceptible to developing neck-shoulder musculoskeletal disorders when performing low-force, repetitive work tasks. Whether this is attributable to gender differences in fatigability and motor control is currently unclear. This study investigated the extent to which women differ from men in fatigability and motor control while performing a short-cycle repetitive task.

Methods: 113 healthy young adults (58 women, 55 men) performed a standardized repetitive pointing task. The task was terminated when the subject's perceived exertion reached 8 on the Borg scale. Time to task termination, and changes in means and cycle-to-cycle variabilities of surface electromyography signals from start to end of the task were compared between women and men, for the upper trapezius, anterior deltoid, biceps and triceps muscles.

Results: Women and men terminated the task after 6.5 (SD 3.75) and 7 (SD 4) min on average (p>0.05). All 4 muscles showed an increase of 25-35% in average muscle activity with fatigue (no significant sex differences). However, men exhibited a higher increase than women in trapezius muscle variability with fatigue (31% vs. 7%; p<0.05), and a decrease in biceps muscle variability where women had an increase (-23% vs. 12%; p<0.05).

Conclusions: Our results suggest that women and men may not differ in the ability to perform repetitive tasks at low-to-moderate force levels. However, differences in motor control strategies employed in task performance may explain gender differences in susceptibility to developing musculoskeletal disorders when performing repetitive work for prolonged periods in occupational life.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 116, no 11-12, p. 2357-2365
Keywords [en]
Pointing movement, motor variability, multi-jointed movements, shoulder, elbow, coordination, motor control, cycle-to-cycle variability, EMG
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-21340DOI: 10.1007/s00421-016-3487-7ISI: 000388936600026PubMedID: 27743025Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84991055945OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hig-21340DiVA, id: diva2:913714
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2009-1761Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2011-0075Available from: 2016-03-22 Created: 2016-03-22 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved

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Srinivasan, DivyaMathiassen, Svend Erik

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