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  • 1.
    Ahmed, Dolovan
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering.
    Fadul, Mohammed Erik Jamal
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering.
    Utsläpp från svenska reningsverk till Östersjön: Granskning av Henriksdals reningsverk, Ryaverket, Sjölunda reningsverk, Kungssängsverket och Duvbackens reningsverk2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    From domestic and industrial waste water will have to be cleaned before it can be released into lakes and streams again. This purification takes place through various stages of treatment plants. Wastewater contains many substances that are harmful to the environment as well as human and animal health, so it is important that the purification that is done is done in an efficient and thoughtful manner. The steps that are common in Swedish cleaning plants are mechanical, biological and chemical purification. These purification steps ensure that larger particles do not come out to the open water, convert nitrogen into nitrogen through the activation process, and that by chemical treatment, the emission of phosphorus is reduced. All of these purification steps can be designed differently and vary from purification plants to purification plants. Therefore, the degree of purification and emissions can distinguish between different treatment plants. Because there are many factors involved in the processes at Swedish waste treatment plants, it is important to carry out annual audits to detect problems that can lead to environmental damage.If cleaning does not work, exercise can increase in lakes and seas, which causes people and animals to suffer. Bottom dead and acid deficiency are already a major problem for the Baltic Sea. In order to reduce the negative environmental effects, emissions of nutrients are drastically reduced. This concerns the release of nutrients from all countries around the Baltic Sea.This study focuses on nitrogen and phosphorus purification from 5 wastewater treatment plants, Henriksdal's purification plant (Stockholm), Ryaverket (Gothenburg), Sjölunda purification plant (Malmö), Kungssängsverket (Uppsala) and Duvbacken purification plant (Gävle). Information about its activities has been obtained through interviews and works own reports.The purification plants use different technical solutions, and all treatment plants meet today's requirements for purification. The biggest difference is the degree of nitrogen purification. All wastewater treatment plants have a history of changes in technical solutions to improve treatment. Cleaning wastewater from households and industries costs a lot of money for the treatment plants, so it's always a challenge for the wastewater treatment plants to clean the water in the best possible way without costing too much.It is expected that the cleaning requirements will be tightened and all treatment plants should continue to develop to increase efficiency. Current purification requirements are designed to suit the recipient's sensitivity. If the EU's idea of ​​the same degree of purification across the country is transformed into requirements, Duvbacken will need to significantly improve the nitrogen treatment at the waste water treatment plant.

  • 2.
    Andersson, Erik
    et al.
    Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden; Beijer Institute, Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Barthel, Stephan
    Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Borgström, Sara
    Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Colding, Johan
    Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden; The Beijer Institute, Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Elmqvist, Thomas
    Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden; The Beijer Institute, Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gren, Åsa
    The Beijer Institute, Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Reconnecting Cities to the Biosphere: Stewardship of Green Infrastructure and Urban Ecosystem Services2014In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 43, no 4, p. 445-453Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Within-city green infrastructure can offer opportunities and new contexts for people to become stewards of ecosystem services. We analyze cities as social-ecological systems, synthesize the literature, and provide examples from more than 15 years of research in the Stockholm urban region, Sweden. The social-ecological approach spans from investigating ecosystem properties to the social frameworks and personal values that drive and shape human interactions with nature. Key findings demonstrate that urban ecosystem services are generated by social-ecological systems and that local stewards are critically important. However, land-use planning and management seldom account for their role in the generation of urban ecosystem services. While the small scale patchwork of land uses in cities stimulates intense interactions across borders much focus is still on individual patches. The results highlight the importance and complexity of stewardship of urban biodiversity and ecosystem services and of the planning and governance of urban green infrastructure.

  • 3.
    Andersson, Erik
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Colding, Johan
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Understanding how built urban form influences biodiversity2014In: Urban Forestry & Urban Greening, ISSN 1618-8667, E-ISSN 1610-8167, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 221-226Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study seeks to contribute to a more complete understanding of how urban form influences biodiversity by investigating the effects of green area distribution and that of built form. We investigated breeding bird diversity in three types of housing development with approximately the same amount of tree cover. No significant differences in terms of bird communities were found between housing types in any of the survey periods. However, detached housing, especially with interspersed trees, had more neotropical insectivores and higher overall diversity of insectivores. Based on our results and theory we suggest a complementary approach to managing biodiversity in urban landscapes - instead of maximising the value and quality of individual patches efforts could go into enhancing over-all landscape quality at the neighbourhood scale by splitting up part of the green infrastructure. The relatively small differences in bird communities also suggest that different stakeholder groups may be engaged in management.

  • 4.
    Barreiro-Gen, Maria
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Carpenter, Angela
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. School of Earth and Environment, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK.
    von Haartman, Robin
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. Organisational Sustainability Ltd., Cardiff, UK.
    Examining Relations Between Public Participationand Public Expenditure: Opinions from English and French Users on Environmental Issues in the English Channel2019In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 11, no 8, article id 2230Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Governments need to decide how to allocate their public expenditure, which is commonly misconstrued as simply targeting social issues. Most scientific literature highlights that the role of public spending is to enhance social welfare and fight poverty and inequality. Nonetheless, public expenditure also includes spending on environmental issues. This paper analyses relations between public participation, support for public expenditure, and pro-environmental behaviour (PEB) intentions in the English Channel region. An online public survey was developed to investigate public use of the English and French sides and the public's willingness to change their behaviour to better protect the Channel region. The survey was undertaken in the summer of 2014 and was answered by 2000 respondents. The Channel region public is willing to participate more in behaviour that involves direct changes or switches between buying/purchasing choices. In contrast, there is less willingness to engage in pro-environmental behaviour intentions that involve more active engagement activities. French respondents were slightly less inclined to change their consumer behaviour intentions, while women and older people were slightly more likely to do so. This research shows that pro-environmental behaviour could positively affect support for proposed public expenditure on environmental issues.

  • 5.
    Barthel, Stephan
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Environmental engineering. Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Belton, Sophie
    Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Raymond, Christopher
    Department of Landscape Architecture, Planning and Management, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Alnarp, Sweden.
    Giusti, Matteo
    Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Fostering Children’s Connection to Nature Through Authentic Situations: The Case of Saving Salamanders at School2018In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 9, article id 928Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     The aim of this paper is to explore how children learn to form new relationships with nature. It draws on a longitudinal case study of children participating in a stewardship project involving the conservation of salamanders during the school day in Stockholm, Sweden. The qualitative method includes two waves of data collection: when a group of 10-year-old children participated in the project (2015) and 2 years after they participated (2017). We conducted 49 interviews with children as well as using participant observations and questionnaires. We found indications that children developed sympathy for salamanders and increased concern and care for nature, and that such relationships persisted 2 years after participation. Our rich qualitative data suggest that whole situations of sufficient unpredictability triggering free exploration of the area, direct sensory contact and significant experiences of interacting with a species were important for children’s development of affective relationships  with the salamander species and with nature in an open-ended sense. Saving the lives of trapped animals enabled direct sensory interaction, feedback, increased understanding, and development of new skills for dynamically exploring further ways of saving species in an interactive process experienced as deeply meaningful, enjoyable and connecting. The behavioral setting instilled a sense of pride and commitment, and the high degree of responsibility given to the children while exploring the habitat during authentic situations enriched children’s enjoyment. The study has implications for the design of education programs that aim to connect children with nature and for a child-sensitive urban policy that supports authentic nature situations in close spatial proximity to preschools and schools.

  • 6.
    Barthel, Stephan
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Environmental engineering.
    Colding, Johan
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building Engineering, Energy Systems and Sustainability Science, Environmental Science. Stockholms Universitet.
    A Critical Perspective on the “Smart City” Model2017Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    As urban ecologists we support developing smoother traffic systems, providing citizens with more easily accessible information, and of course promoting citizen-participation and local democracy in political decision-making. However, and as is normally the common destiny when new models for sustainable development are appearing, investments in these “smarter” models run the risk of making people blind to problems that need more immediate concern. In short, governance is a matter of prioritizing among different goals. Governance is also about making sure that strong and powerful enterprises and business interests do not hijack the public debate

  • 7.
    Barthel, Stephan
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Environmental engineering.
    Colding, Johan
    Stockholms Universitet.
    The Smart (Cyborg) City Needs Smarter Ecological Resilience Thinking2017Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Employing a sort of a cyborg worldview—meaning a living system of intertwined human and machine parts—the Smart City system is seen as contributing to urban sustainability with the basic assumption that ‘the Internet of Things’ serves social and public ends. These ends include economic benefits, improving efficiency and quality of life for people by optimizing control of infrastructures. In this view, urban residents are at the center of a city’s sustainability transformation, while at the same time serving as “data sources”, providing urban planners (central controllers of the cyborg) various sources of information about human behavior that may or may not be exploited. While various efficiency measures often are beneficial for society, at least in the short term, the discussions of resilience of such a cyborg is mostly entirely avoided.

  • 8.
    Barthel, Stephan
    et al.
    Department of History, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden; Stockholm Resilience Center, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Parker, John
    National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis, University of California, Santa Barbara, USA; Barrett Honors College, Arizona State University, Tempe, USA.
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholm Resilience Center, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden; Beijer Institute of Ecological Economics, Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Colding, Johan
    Stockholm Resilience Center, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden Beijer Institute of Ecological Economics, Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Urban gardens: pockets of social-ecological memory2014In: Greening in the Red Zone: Disaster, Resilience, and Community Greening Part II / [ed] Keith G. Tidball and Marianne E. Krasny, Dordrecht: Springer Netherlands , 2014, p. 145-158Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is well known that urban allotment gardens provide important ecosystem services. Their potential to act as sources of local resilience during times of crisis is less appreciated, despite the role they have played as areas of food security during times of crisis in history. Their ability to provide such relief, however, requires that the skills and knowledge needed for effective gardening can be transmitted over time and across social groups. In short, some portion of urban society must remember how to grow food. This chapter proposes that collectively managed gardens function as ‘pockets’ of social-ecological memory in urban landscapes by storing the knowledge and experience required to grow food. Allotment gardeners operate as ‘communities of practice’ with ecosystem stewardship reflecting long-term, dynamic interactions between community members and gardening sites. Social-ecological memories about food production and past crises are retained and transmitted through habits, traditions, informal institutions, artifacts and the physical structure of the gardens themselves. Allotment gardens thus serve as incubators of social-ecological knowledge with experiences that can be accessed and transferred to other land uses in times of crisis, contributing to urban resilience. Conversely, failure to protect these pockets of social-ecological memory could result in a collective ‘forgetting’ of important social-ecological knowledge and reduce social-ecological resilience.

  • 9.
    Bendt, Pim
    et al.
    Beijer Institute of Ecological Economics, Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden; .
    Barthel, Stephan
    Stockholm Resilience Center, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of History, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Colding, Johan
    Beijer Institute of Ecological Economics, Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden; Stockholm Resilience Center, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Civic greening and environmental learning in public-access community gardens in Berlin2013In: Landscape and Urban Planning, ISSN 0169-2046, E-ISSN 1872-6062, Vol. 109, no 1, p. 18-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We analyse environmental learning in public-access community gardens (‘PAC-gardens’) in Berlin, representing public green spaces that are collectively managed by civil society groups. Through extensive fieldwork, and drawing upon social theories of learning, we describe learning communities in four PAC-gardens and analyse factors that influence participation and boundary interaction, that is when experiences brought in from the outside encounter socially defined competences. Results show that these PAC-gardens have self-generated social and physical structures, which to different degrees inhibit or facilitate boundary interactions, whereas skills of individuals to put those to work, in combination with the quality of the surrounding neighbourhoods, can be ascribed for creating broader participation and greater diversity in the content of learning about local sustainability. Identified learning streams included learning about gardening and local ecological conditions; about urban politics, and about social entrepreneurship. We discuss results in relation to environmental learning that combats the generational amnesia in cities about our dependence on nature, where PAC-gardens clearly distinguish themselves from more closed forms of urban gardening such as allotment gardens and gated community gardens. We conclude that PAC-gardens that intertwine gardening with social, political and economic practices can create broader and more heterogeneous learning about social–ecological conditions, and help develop sense-of-place in degraded neighbourhoods.

  • 10.
    Buck, Sine
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management.
    Determining the best location for a nature-like fishway in Gavle River, Sweden2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The construction of dams and hydro-power stations are some of the most common anthropogenic changes of watercourses and rivers. While being important to humans and society by providing electricity, these obstructions of watercourses can have severe consequences for the aquatic ecosystems. One consequence is that dams often hinder the important movement of migrating fish species between habitats. This can lead to decline and even extinction of important fish populations. To prevent these negative effects, a number of different fish passage systems, including nature-like fishways, have been developed. Nature-like fishways mimic natural streams in order to function as a natural corridor for a wide range of species. Planning and construction of a nature-like fishway is a complex task that often involves many different interests. In the present study a combination of multi-criteria decision analysis and least-cost path analysis is used for determining the best location for a nature-like fishway past Strömdalen dam in Gavleån, Sweden. An anisotropic least-cost path algorithm is applied on a friction-layer and a digital elevation model, and the least-cost path for a nature-like fishway is determined. The results show that the method is useful in areas of varying topography and steep slopes. However, because low slope is a very important factor when constructing a nature-like fishway, slope becomes the dominating factor in this analysis at the expense of e.g. distance to roads. Combining the methods with results from biological studies of fish behavior and detailed hydrological modelling would provide a very strong tool for the planning of nature-like fishways.

  • 11.
    Börjeson, Fia Christina
    et al.
    Chalmers bibliotek, Centrum för fackspråk och kommunikation.
    Eriksson, Ann-Marie
    Chalmers bibliotek, Centrum för fackspråk och kommunikation.
    Erlandsson, Johan
    Institutionen för energi och miljö, Miljösystemanalys.
    Hillman, Karl
    Institutionen för energi och miljö, Miljösystemanalys, Chalmers tekniska universitet, Göteborg.
    Molander, Sverker
    Institutionen för energi och miljö, Miljösystemanalys, Chalmers tekniska universitet, Göteborg.
    Rex, Emma
    Institutionen för energi och miljö, Miljösystemanalys, Chalmers tekniska universitet, Göteborg.
    Ger koppling av kunskapsinlärning och färdighetsövning ökad djupinlärning?: "Utveckling av kursmoment i ”Miljö- och resursanalys för hållbar utveckling V2”2007Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Kursen ”Miljö- och resursanalys för hållbar utveckling V2”, som är en av de obli-gatoriska kurserna under andra året i civilingenjörsutbildningen (Väg och Vat-ten) vid Chalmers tekniska högskola har omfattats av ett pedagogiskt utveck-lingsarbete. Utgångspunkten till de förändringar som prövats har varit grundade i och inspirerade av Experiential Learning Theory1. Lärarlaget utvecklade, med stöd av en gemensamt producerad begreppsmodell, metoder för att intervenera på olika stadier, och på olika sätt, i studenternas lärprocess. Arbetet har handlat om att skapa goda förutsättningar för att förstärka studenternas lärande. Ett så-dant lärande innebär att studenterna tillägnar sig en ökad förståelse och fördju-pade kunskaper, genom att koppla samman färdigheter som reflektion och kommunikation med tillägnandet av ett relativt abstrakt stoff (miljö- och resurs-analys). Detta har skett med hjälp av att modifiera kursens organisation och struktur, genom att utveckla återkommande och varierande typer av reflektions-övningar samt genom att arbeta fram återkommande och varierande former för olika typer av återkoppling till studenterna. En viktig del av arbetet har också va-rit att försöka utvärdera utfallet av de förändringar som genomförts i kursen. Ut-ifrån de begränsningar som det empiriska materialet innebär är det inte helt klart om titelns fråga besvarats i undersökningen, men studenternas resultat liksom deras utvärdering av kursen pekar tydligt på positiva effekter ifråga om lärandet.

  • 12.
    Casao, Marah
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering.
    Study of quality of drinking water: In rural areas of Souss Massa region2018Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The scarcity of water affects many developing nations. Today, Morocco,characterized by an arid and semi-arid climate, is approaching absolute scarcityof freshwater availability of 730 m3/capita/year. The effect of the scarcity ofwater is highly evident in rural localities, which are driven to rely on wellwater and rainwater harvesting. Potability of alternative water sources isuncertain as it is not monitored by municipal treatment plants.The objective of this investigation was to study the quality and quantity ofdrinking water in rural areas of Souss Massa region. Water samples collectedfrom seven study sites were sent to private laboratories for microbiologicaland physicochemical analysis.The results of the tests revealed that the drinking water in Agadir Ouguejgal,Ben Anfar and Ait Said was unsafe for human consumption due to fecalcontamination. Concerning physicochemical examination, nitrate levels inTouamal as well as iron levels in Agadir Ouguejgal exceeded the maximumallowable concentration provided by the WHO and the Moroccan regulations.This constitutes serious health risk to its population. To prevent diseaseoutbreaks and long-term illness in these areas, anomalies to MoroccanStandards, should be addressed.The scarcity of water is highly evident in Agadir Ouguejgal, where waterconsumption is approximately 8 l/capita/day. With this amount of waterconsumption, proper sanitation cannot be assured.Statistically, a strong correlation was found between E. coli and totalcoliform. Trend analysis demonstrated a downward trend on water balance inthe Souss Massa region.To mitigate water quality issues in the Souss Massa region, a morecomprehensive investigation is mandatory which focuses on the exact sourceof the pollution and measures that is applicable to rural villages.

  • 13.
    Colding, Johan
    Beijer Institute of Ecological Economics, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Creating incentives for increased public engagement in ecosystem management through urban commons2011In: Adapting Institutions: Governance, Complexity and Social-Ecological Resilience / [ed] Boyd, E. and Folke, C., Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press , 2011, 1, p. 101-124Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Over half the world's population currently lives in urban areas; by 2030, nearly five billion people are expected to live in cities (Ash et al. 2008). Between 2010 and 2030, the amount of the built mass on the earth is predicted to double, creating ever-greater demands on the services that nearby and distant ecosystems provide (Grimm et al. 2008). With a greater proportion of humans living in metropolitan areas, urban ecosystems will experience increased land-use and land-cover change. Currently, urbanisation endangers more species and is more geographically ubiquitous than any other human activity; urban sprawl is rapidly transforming critical habitats of global value, such as the Atlantic Forest Region of Brazil, the Cape of South Africa and coastal Central America (Elmqvist et al. 2008). Urbanisation leads not only to increased homogenisation of fauna and flora (McKinney 2002) but also to an impoverished biology in metropolitan areas, which arguably serves as a constant reminder of the presumed unimportance of biodiversity and so may contribute to ‘environmental generational amnesia’ among the greater public (Miller 2005). To gain the much-needed broad-based public support for a sustainable use of ecosystems, both within and outside cities, the places where people live and work need to offer opportunities for meaningful interactions with functioning ecosystems (Rosenzweig 2003, Miller 2005, Andersson et al. 2007, Colding 2007). In this respect, and to help mitigate the growing disconnection of urban residents from nature (Pyle 1978, 1993), the dynamics of property rights determining human relationships to land can have powerful ramifications and be worthy of scholarly analysis to provide propositions about both the manner in which land ownership in cities evolves (Webster 2003) and its potential outcomes, such as the provision of the ecosystem services critical to human well-being (Daily 1997, Millennium Ecosystem Assessment 2005). It is increasingly recognised that today's institutions match current changes in ecosystems and their dynamics poorly (Millennium Ecosystem Assessment 2005, Folke et al. 2007).

  • 14.
    Colding, Johan
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Ekosystem sliter i städer2011In: Miljöforskning : Formas tidning för ett uthålligt samhälle, ISSN 1650-4925, no 9Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Trots att grönområden har stor betydelse för städers klimat och för människors välbefinnande är kunskap om detta bristfällig bland stadsplanerare. Pollinering av växter och grödor, fröspridning eller vatten- och luftrening är arbete som naturen utför och som vi är beroende av i våra samhällen. Hur man med hjälp av ekosystemtjänster kan planera och bygga mer hållbara städer studeras i ett stort internationellt projekt SUPER (Sustainable Urban Planning for Ecosystems Services and Resilience).

  • 15.
    Colding, Johan
    Beijer International Institute of Ecological Economics, Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden; Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Local Assessment of Stockholm: Revisiting the Stockholm Urban Assessment2013In: Urbanization, Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services: Challenges and Opportunities: A Global Assessment / [ed] Thomas Elmqvist, Michail Fragkias, Julie Goodness, Burak Güneralp, Peter J. Marcotullio, Robert I. McDonald, Susan Parnell, Maria Schewenius, Marte Sendstad, Karen C. Seto, and Cathy Wilkinson, New York: Springer Netherlands , 2013, 1, p. 313-335Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the year 2003, the Stockholm Urban Assessment (SUA) was selected as a sub-global assessment within the global Millennium Ecosystem Assessment (MA, Ecosystems and human well-being: synthesis. Island Press, Washington, DC, 2005). This chapter revisits SUA and fills in important knowledge gaps in the assessment as well as provides insights on urban resilience building. The chapter applies a critical perspective on the present urban development trajectory of the Stockholm metropolitan area. It emphasizes the need to understand ways in which informally managed green spaces contribute to ecological functions in urban settings. The chapter provides a background of the Stockholm region and the current challenges it faces, followed by a synthesis of the major insights conveyed in SUA related to informal ecosystem management. The chapter concludes by proposing policy recommendations of general implications for urban resilience building.

  • 16.
    Colding, Johan
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    The role of ecosystem services in contemporary urban planning2011In: Urban Ecology: patterns, processes and applications / [ed] Jari Niemelä, Jürgen H. Breuste, Thomas Elmqvist, Glenn Guntenspergen, Philip James, and Nancy E. McIntyre, Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press , 2011, p. 228-237Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Urban sprawl is often characterised as a serious land use problem. It refers to the spread of urban congestion into adjoining suburbs and rural areas, often resulting in the loss of ecosystems and their services. This chapter reviews two of the most prevalent planning strategies proposed to combat urban sprawl, i.e. smart growth (or new urbanism) and green infrastructure planning. The former is predominantly derived from a frustration over the failure of American planning projects, and is increasingly adopted among planners in North American and European metropolitan regions. The latter is predominantly proposed by ecologists and biodiversity conservationists, and has shaped conservation planning in many countries. Both planning strategies propose compact urban development as a way to combat adverse effects of urban sprawl. However, and as pointed out in this chapter, many types of ecosystem services are generated in the developed landscape, also in sprawling suburban settings. It is also important to account for ecosystem services in smart growth projects and to engage a wider set of urban residents in management of these services in order to mitigate ecological illiteracy. The chapter elucidates some of the key characteristics and propositions of both approaches and provides examples of urban designs that hold potential to work as frameworks in contributing to sustainable governance of ecosystem services.

  • 17.
    Colding, Johan
    et al.
    Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden; The Beijer Institute of Ecological Economics, Royal Academy of Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Barthel, Stephan
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Environmental engineering. Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    An urban ecology critique on the "Smart City" model2017In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 164, p. 95-101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this letter is to raise some critical concerns and gaps in the booming literature on Smart Cities; concerns that we think deserve greater attention from scientists, policy makers and urban planners. Using an urban ecology lens, we provide some reflections that need to forgo any wider-scale implementation of the Smart City-model with the goal to enhance urban sustainability. We discuss that the Smart City literature must better include analysis around social sustainability issues for city dwellers. Focus here should start on health issues and more critical analysis about whom the Smart City is for. Also, the literature must address issues of resilience and cyber security, including how Smart City solutions may affect the autonomy of urban governance, personal integrity and how it may affect the resilience of infrastructures that provide inhabitants with basic needs, such as food, energy and water security. A third major gap in this literature is how smart city developments may change human-nature relations. Focus here should start on how Smart City technologies may hinder or support children’s learning towards a stronger psychological connection with nature. Discussions are also needed on how the Smart City model may affect pro-environmental behavior more broadly.

  • 18.
    Colding, Johan
    et al.
    The Beijer Institute of Ecological Economics, The Royal Swedish Academy of Science; Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Barthel, Stephan
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Environmental engineering. Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Resilience and Sustainable Development2017In: Dreams and Seeds: The role of campuses in sustainable urban development / [ed] Schewenius, M., Keränen, P., al Rawaf, R., Stockholm: Stockholm Resilience Centre and Metropolia University of Applied Sciences , 2017, 1, p. 28-29Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Colding, Johan
    et al.
    The Beijer Institute of Ecological Economics, Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden; Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Barthel, Stephan
    The Beijer Institute of Ecological Economics, Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden; Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of History, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    The potential of ‘Urban Green Commons’ in the resilience building of cities2013In: Ecological Economics, ISSN 0921-8009, E-ISSN 1873-6106, Vol. 86, p. 156-166Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While cultural diversity is increasing in cities at a global level as a result of urbanization, biodiversity is decreasing with a subsequent loss of ecosystem services. It is clear that diversity plays a pivotal role in the resilience building of ecosystems; however, it is less clear what role cultural diversity plays in the resil- ience building of urban systems. In this paper we provide innovative insights on how common property sys- tems could contribute to urban resilience building. Through a review of recent findings on urban common property systems and the relevant literature, we deal with urban green commons (UGCs) and discuss their potential to manage cultural and biological diversity in cities. We describe three examples of UGCs, i.e. col- lectively managed parks, community gardens, and allotment areas, with a focus on their institutional characteristics, their role in promoting diverse learning streams, environmental stewardship, and social– ecological memory. We discuss how UGCs can facilitate cultural integration through civic participation in urban land-management, conditions for the emergence of UGCs, the importance of cognitive resilience building, and what role property-rights diversity plays in urban settings. We conclude by elucidating some key insights on how UGCs can promote urban resilience building.

  • 20.
    Colding, Johan
    et al.
    The Beijer Institute of Ecological Economics, Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden; Stockholm Resilience Center, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Barthel, Stephan
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Environmental engineering. Stockholm Resilience Center, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    The Role of University Campuses in Reconnecting Humans to the Biosphere2017In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 9, no 12, article id 2349Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we explore the potential for integrating university campuses in a global sustainability agenda for a closer reconnection of urban residents to the biosphere. This calls for a socio-cultural transition that allows universities and colleges to reconnect to the biosphere and become active stewards of the Earth System. Recognizing their pivotal role of fostering coming generations of humans, university campuses represent a unique socio-cultural setting to promote sustainable development in practice. Among others, this involves the nurturing of biodiversity and ecosystem services in the Antropocene era, which is characterized by ongoing climate change and massive loss of biodiversity and ecosystem services. We explore the traditional campus setting, its role as a community for rejuvenating town planning and its role as a governance authority that may promote or retard sustainable development with an ecological focus. We explore the “sustainable” university and describe the campus as an ecosystem and how a resilient campus can be designed to meet the novel and critical challenges of the Anthropocene. We conclude by providing some policy recommendations for higher educational institutes to speed up their ambitions in the area of sustainable biosphere management.

  • 21.
    Colding, Johan
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building Engineering, Energy Systems and Sustainability Science, Environmental Science. Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholms Universitet; Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences.
    Barthel, Stephan
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building Engineering, Energy Systems and Sustainability Science, Environmental Science. Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholms Universitet.
    Sörqvist, Patrik
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building Engineering, Energy Systems and Sustainability Science, Environmental Science.
    Wicked Problems of Smart Cities2019In: Smart Cities, ISSN 2624-6511, Vol. 2, no 4, p. 512-521Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is often uncritically assumed that, when digital technologies are integrated into the operation of city functions, they inevitably contribute to sustainable urban development. Such a notion rests largely on the belief that Information and Communication Technology (ICT) solutions pave the way for more democratic forms of planning, and that ‘smart’ technological devices result in a range of environmental benefits, e.g., energy efficiency and the mitigation of global warming. Drawing on the scientific literature that deals with ‘smart cities’, we here elaborate on how both propositions fail to consider drawbacks that could be characterized as ‘wicked’, i.e., problems that lack simplistic solutions and straightforward planning responses, and which often come about as ‘management surprises’, as a byproduct of achieving sustainability. We here deal with problems related to public choice constraints, ‘non-choice default technologies’ and the costs of automation for human learning and resilience. To avoid undemocratic forms of planning and too strong a dependence on non-choice default technologies, e.g., smart phones, we recommend that planners and policy makers safeguard redundancy in public-choice options by maintaining a wide range of alternative choices, including analog ones. Resilience thinking could help planners deal more effectively with the ‘wickedness’ of an increasingly hyper-connected society.

  • 22.
    Colding, Johan
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Environmental engineering. Beijer Institute of Ecological Economics, Royal Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Colding, Magnus
    Colding Digital Teknik AB, Sweden.
    Barthel, Stephan
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Environmental engineering. Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Sweden.
    The smart city model: A new panacea for urban sustainability or unmanageable complexity?2018In: Environment and Planning B: Urban Analytics and City Science, ISSN 2399-8083Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite several calls in this journal of debating the rapid growth of the literature on ‘‘smart cities’’, such a debate has in large been absent. Smart cities are often un-critically launched as a sustainable way of developing cities. When cities become increasingly complex as its features are wired into the Internet, theories for their understanding is lagging behind. As it is prospected that a greater number of people and things will become connected by Information and Computer Technology, the complexity of urban systems will over time increase. Historical insights reveal that as complexity in societies increase, growth in energy consumption tends to follow. In this paper, we discuss whether complexity carried too far could lead to diminishing returns of energy saving and create unmanageable urban systems. As part of initiating such a debate, this commentary asks whether the smart cities development has a bearing on the issue whether a society can erode its capacity of sustaining itself? We pose this question against the backdrop that no one actually knows what type of society the smart cities model in the end will generate.

  • 23.
    Colding, Johan
    et al.
    Centre for Research on Natural Resources and the Environment and Department of Systems Ecology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Folke, Carl
    Centre for Research on Natural Resources and the Environment and Department of Systems Ecology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Comment on Ruttan, L. M. and Borgerhoff Mulder, M. (1999) Are East African Pastoralists Truly Conservationists?1999In: Current Anthropology, ISSN 0011-3204, E-ISSN 1537-5382, Vol. 40, no 1, p. 638-639Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Enver, Pekin
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building Engineering, Energy Systems and Sustainability Science.
    Minska matsvinnet i skolan: Ett pilotprojekt på tre grundskolor i Ljusdals kommun2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The author (Enver Pekin) has chosen to dwell into the subject of wasted foods and more specifically wasted foods in elementary schools.

    Food waste can be divided into two subgroups; food waste such as fish bones, coffee grounds, and egg shells, and wasted food that could have been saved had it been handled differently. Both food waste and wasted foods occur in every part of the grocery chain and impact our environment negatively. The production of grocery in of itself impact our environment through, among other things, greenhouse gases and the over fertilisation of substances such as nitrogen and phosphorus.

    Some estimations show that up to one third of all produced foods are thrown. This impacts the environment in ways that are unnecessary and even unsustainable in regard to how we use vital resources such as fresh water and natural grounds. Swedish school kitchens throw an estimated 50 000 tons of food per year, half of which are regarded as wasted foods.

    This study’s objective has been to examine how information campaigns impact the school children’s behaviour. For this purpose, an experiment has been designed and implemented on three selected schools in the province of Ljusdal. The aim has been to get the students to throw less food. Earlier research has shown that there is a possibility of reducing wasted foods with up to 20 %.

    Results of this experiment have shown that wasted foods in regard to plate portions has been reduced by 29 %. The results thereby corroborate earlier research which implies that information campaigns could eventually be used as a means to impact behaviour. How information campaigns are designed could also be of significance in regard to the resulting outcome.

  • 25.
    Eriksson, Christoffer
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building Engineering, Energy Systems and Sustainability Science, Environmental Science.
    Khorshed, Dorothy
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building Engineering, Energy Systems and Sustainability Science, Environmental Science.
    Fallstudie om hur Gävle kommun kan minska sitt dricksvattensvinn2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    To ensure sustainable development UN approved 17 sustainable development goals in the year of 2015, in which goal six specifies to ensure water and sanitation for all, and specified in goal six target indicator four, in a more effective way. To have an average of 24% in losses of the total amount of produced drinking water in Sweden is not effective, and Gävle municipality isn´t any better with their recorded drinking water wastage between 28-40% the last years. A big part of the losses of drinking water are assumed to be water that the municipality uses within their daily work such as rinsing of the drinking water network and inadequate measurements of the used drinking water. The aim of this study is to create groundwork for an action plan for how Gästrike Vatten can work to minimize their drinking water losses in Gävle municipality.To identify what the organization considers to be most important is a good first step in creating an action plan, to then select key elements to which goals can be phrased to ese future comparisons with similar organizations. Through internet research, surveys, interviews, computer analysis, in addition literature searches Gävle munici-palities condition of soil, dimensions- and materials of the drinking water network have been established.Gävle Vatten works actively to reduce their commercial drinking water losses by sealing water hydrants and installing water kiosks all around the municipality. The first step to localize leaks in the network is by district division which seven out of the eight respondents use. Acoustic leak detection is the most common secondary step to localize leaks more accurately that Gävle municipality uses, however certain difficulties can emerge. Most of the new drinking water pipelines are made from plastic, which has a lower sound conductivity then pipelines made from metal.It is a continual process to reduce ones drinking water losses to an acceptable level, one which Gävle municipality has already started. To potentiate the effect of their work an action plan is recommended within the organization to identify goals and ways to achieve them so that the company’s resources can be distributed accord-ingly. Their next step can be to work with active leak detection, more specifically with gas injection that works well on metal as well as plastic pipelines. To acquire more accurate measurements of the consumed drinking water, digital water meters are recommended at the consumers.The authors believe that Gävle municipality has good conditions to continue devel-oping their work to minimize their drinking water losses.

  • 26.
    Eriksson, Ola
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Environmental engineering. Profu i Göteborg AB, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Bisaillon, Mattias
    Multiple system modelling of waste management2011In: Waste Management, ISSN 0956-053X, E-ISSN 1879-2456, Vol. 31, no 12, p. 2620-2630Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Due to increased environmental awareness, planning and performance of waste management has become more and more complex. Therefore waste management has early been subject to different types of modelling. Another field with long experience of modelling and systems perspective is energy systems. The two modelling traditions have developed side by side, but so far there are very few attempts to combine them. Waste management systems can be linked together with energy systems through incineration plants. The models for waste management can be modelled on a quite detailed level whereas surrounding systems are modelled in a more simplistic way. This is a problem, as previous studies have shown that assumptions on the surrounding system often tend to be important for the conclusions. In this paper it is shown how two models, one for the district heating system (MARTES) and another one for the waste management system (ORWARE), can be linked together. The strengths and weaknesses with model linking are discussed when compared to simplistic assumptions on effects in the energy and waste management systems. It is concluded that the linking of models will provide a more complete, correct and credible picture of the consequences of different simultaneous changes in the systems. The linking procedure is easy to perform and also leads to activation of project partners. However, the simulation procedure is a bit more complicated and calls for the ability to run both models.

  • 27.
    Eriksson, Philip
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering.
    Andra slänger mat, inte jag: Nudging för mindre matsvinn i skolor2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Food waste is a problem that permeates the whole food supply chain and cause economic losses, negative effects on the climate and environment and depletion of finite resources. The scale of required change necessary to counteract the negative effects is huge. In Swedens schools food waste loss is a matter of a costly wastage, both from an environmental perspective, but also with regard to municipalities' limited resources. Due to this, there is a big demand for waste loss reducing measures. Something that can help mitigate the extent of the food waste problem is behavioral change. Unfortunately, we cannot expect change to occur on one’s own. We need tools that can nudge us in the right direction.

    This thesis is a theoretical base that explores and describes how nudging, a tool for sustainable behaviors, can be a part of the solution to the food waste problem in school canteens. Recommendations for design and implementation of such change strategies are presented, with a special focus on planned interventions (nudges) and practical application. The goal is that the study will contribute to the application of behavioral insights in the environmental field. The foundation of the thesis consists of two earlier studies, a literature study, aimed at examining nudging as a tool for sustainable societal development, and a pilot study, aimed at examining students' behavior in canteens, and how they deal with leftovers. The first study found a number of practical shortcomings if nudging (the tool) is to be used successfully, long-term and more extensively in environmental work. The pilot study found irrationally made decisions among students.

    In order to answer how nudging can be part of the solution to the food waste problem in schools, the thesis applied the strategic framework for sustainable development. According to the strategic framework for sustainable development nudges employs as a catalyzing action while nudging is a tangible tool for strategic behavior change management. In the thesis nudging and nudges are presented as two separate parts of the behavior change management process, this also illustrates how each part can be part of the solution to the problem, because it clarifies the scope of the notions and their role in resolving the issue. Based on knowledge gained from the pilot study, the thesis draws conclusions that there is a theoretical potential to use nudging to encourage sustainable development in school canteens and reduce food waste, especially when students are about to leave the canteen, but also in the serving situation and during everyday school hours. Identified areas to focus on when applying nudges were mainly evaluation and feedback, smart anchors, order, normative messages, commitment, reminders, fewer options, strategic planning, loss disclosure and less social proof.

    In addition to this, the thesis finally gave suggestions for working with nudging from an above- or below perspective (by integrating assessment questions in the decision-making process) to adjust the application of interventions.

  • 28. Order onlineBuy this publication >>
    Fagerström, Arne
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Business and Economic Studies, Business administration.
    Cunningham, Gary M.University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Business and Economic Studies, Business administration.
    A good life for all: Essays on sustainability celebrating 60 years of making life better2017Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    For a better world now and in the future

    For a world that sustains itself for genereations to come, the University of Gävle is an ambitious and development-oriented organization with a focus on sustainability now and in the future. Under the leadership of Dr. Maj-Britt Johansson, the University is creating a sustainable community. This book commemorates her efforts in hounour of her 60th birthday.

    The ten essays here show the wide variety of sustainability activities under her leadership, not limited to ecological issues, includning science, social work, building design and contruction, and World Hertiage sites, along with a variety of other cutting-edge topics.

  • 29.
    Falk Dikici, Selina
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building Engineering, Energy Systems and Sustainability Science, Environmental Science.
    Visualisering och kvantifiering av klorparaffiner: En studie av flödet av klorparaffiner på Rörverk 98, Sandvik AB2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Sandvik AB is an industrial group with operations throughout the world. One of the company's three business areas, Sandvik Materials Technology, develops and manu-factures stainless steel products. In production, they seek to replace hazardous mate-rials/substances with less hazardous alternatives or minimize the use of them. A sus-pected environmentally hazardous substance used in industry is chloroparaffins. Sandvik AB manufactures seamless stainless steel tubes with pilgering, where chlo-roparaffins (chlorine oil) are used as lubricants and coolants and these have an im-portant role for the production and for productivity. Sandvik AB uses chlorine oil containing long-chain chloroparaffins. During pilgering, the lubricant is added in conjunction with the activities that make the steel pipes come into contact with the steel tools. The purpose of the study was to carry out a survey of the flow of chloro-paraffins on one of Sandvik's tube plants, Rörverk 98. This has been done by apply-ing the substance flow analysis method (SFA), which is a tool used for analyzing a single substance in a given system. In this study, SFA was applied through six steps. In steps 1 and 2, study objectives and systems are defined. The aim was to convey new dimensions of information to the company and that the approach would be clearly and comprehensively reported. The system definition was to investigate the chlorine paraffin flow, at Rörverk 98, for 28 months. In steps 3 and 4, an inventory and design of the flow chart were carried out. The survey has been carried out through a literature review of Sandvik AB's reports and visits with interviews at the plant. With information from the inventory, a flow chart was created and flows were quantified. In step 5, the mass balance between incoming and outgoing flows was calculated using layers, this is the primary flow. In the last step, step 6, the re-sult was interpreted by applying the HS-method used to calculate the uncertainty of the results. The uncertainty factor is used to calculate a possible minimum and max-imum flow. The result of the survey has been visualized by creating a clear picture of the system and the chlorine paraffin flow and the risk of spillage on/from the pipeline. Within the study's system boundary, it is identified that there is a risk of spreading via emissions to air as well as by drips from cranes outside the plant. The mass balance resulted in a primary flow with a difference of 2.2% kg Cl between in-coming flow and outgoing flow with bearing. The difference may be due to inaccu-racies in inventory data or knowledge gaps such as unknown emissions. The im-provement measures recommended that Sandvik AB shall carry out regularly docu-mented inventory of flows and stocks, thereby gaining a greater insight into the chlorine paraffin flow. Lack of information about the substance made it difficult to determine how they can behave in the system. Future studies are required to deter-mine the environmental impact of long-chain chlorinated paraffins.

  • 30.
    Finnveden, Göran
    et al.
    KTH, Miljöstrategisk analys.
    Ekvall, Tomas
    IVL.
    Björklund, Anna
    KTH, Miljöstrategisk analys (flyttat 20130630).
    von Borgstede, Chris
    Göteborgs Universitet.
    Eriksson, Ola
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Environmental engineering.
    Forsfält, Thomas
    Konjunkturinstitutet.
    Guath, Mona
    Uppsala Universitet.
    Henriksson, Greger
    KTH, Miljöstrategisk analys (fms).
    Ljunggren Söderman, Maria
    IVL.
    Stemarck, Åsa
    IVL.
    Sundqvist, Jan-Olof
    IVL.
    Svenfelt, Åsa
    KTH, Miljöstrategisk analys (fms).
    Söderholm, Patrik
    Luleå Tekniska Universitet.
    Åkesson, Lynn
    Lunds Universitet.
    Regeringen måste satsa på resurseffektivt samhälle2013In: Dagens nyheter, ISSN 1101-2447, no 2013-04-01Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Regeringen förbereder en avfallspolitisk proposition. Den kommer förhoppningsvis att klargöra vem som ska ha ansvaret att samla in våra förpackningar. Men fokus borde också ligga på hur vi kan gå mot ett samhälle där resurser används så effektivt som möjligt, skriver forskare på miljöområdet.

  • 31. Folke, Carl
    et al.
    Colding, Johan
    Olsson, Per
    Hahn, Thomas
    Interdependent Social-Ecological Systems and Adaptive Governance for Ecosystem Services2007In: The SAGE handbook of environment and society / [ed] Jules N. Pretty, Andy Ball, Ted Benton, Julia Guivant, David Lee, David Orr, Max Pfeffer and Hugh Ward, Los Angeles: Sage Publications, 2007, p. 536-552Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Fregidou-Malama, Maria
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Business and Economic Studies, Business administration.
    Jakobsson, Sonny Karl Oskar
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Business and Economic Studies, Business administration.
    Local produced and organic food for sustainable development2017In: Consuming the Environment / [ed] Eva Åsén Ekstrand, 2017, p. 25-26Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study analyses the perceptions of consumers with regard to local produced and organic food in the region of Gävleborg, Sweden. The aim of the study is to investigate consumers` attitudes by giving insight in why consumers buy local produced and organic food and how they conceive them. Quantitative data was collected through the use of structured questionnaire. We approached six hundred seventeen consumers outside twelve grocery stores directly after their shopping.  The study shows consumers have the opinion that local produced and organic food have higher quality than other kind of food,  their production supports sustainable environmental development and promotes the local society and local business. Consumers older than 65 years are more positive than younger ones to local produced and organic food and women are willing to pay more for purchasing the food.

    The results illustrate that consumers think it is difficult to allocate local produced and organic food in the stores, the assortment is poor and the prices of organic food are high. The correlations between attitudes regarding Organic, Organic Local produced, and Local produced foods show that the consumers consider them as related, but not identical. It also indicates that consumers have vague attitudes about Local Produced foods and lack knowledge to define them.

    Differences in price sensitivity demonstrate that consumers are willing to pay more for Organic and Local produced foods, showing there is value in, and demand for reliable guarantee label systems such as KRAV. We suggest a cooperation between public authorities and business organizations to develop trustworthy guarantee label system for Local produced foods.

    We see a need for marketing and information campaigns to develop knowledge of what Organic and Local produced foods stand for to increase trust and awareness. By emphasizing on positive partial characteristics such as non-Genetically modified organisms (GMO) in marketing/information campaigns, negative connotation to organic as expensive may be avoided when educating consumers about the definition of organic foods.

    We propose comparative studies in other regions and countries as well as studies about visibility and availability of organic and/or local produced foods in the shops.

  • 33.
    Gordon, Line
    et al.
    Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Crona, Bea
    Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden; Global Economic Dynamics and the Biosphere Program, Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Henriksson, Patrik
    Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden; WorldFish, Jalan Batu Maung, Bayan Lepas, Penang, Malaysia.
    van Holt, Tracy
    Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden; Global Economic Dynamics and the Biosphere Program, Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden; Leonard N Stern School of Business, Center for Sustainable Business, New York, NY, United States.
    Jonell, Malin
    Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lindahl, Therese
    Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden; Beijer Institute of Ecological Economics, Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Troell, Max
    Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden; Beijer Institute of Ecological Economics, Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Barthel, Stephan
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Environmental engineering. Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Deutsch, Lisa
    Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden; Global Economic Dynamics and the Biosphere Program, Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden; Beijer Institute of Ecological Economics, Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Haider, L. Jamila
    Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rockström, Johan
    Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Queiroz, Cibele
    Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rewiring food systems to enhance human health and biosphere stewardship.2017In: Environmental Research Letters, ISSN 1748-9326, E-ISSN 1748-9326, Vol. 12, no 10, article id 100201Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Food lies at the heart of both health and sustainability challenges. We use a social-ecological framework to illustrate how major changes to the volume, nutrition and safety of food systems between 1961 and today impact health and sustainability. These changes have almost halved undernutrition while doubling the proportion who are overweight. They have also resulted in reduced resilience of the biosphere, pushing four out of six analysed planetary boundaries across the safe operating space of the biosphere. Our analysis further illustrates that consumers and producers have become more distant from one another, with substantial power consolidated within a small group of key actors. Solutions include a shift from a volume-focused production system to focus on quality, nutrition, resource use efficiency, and reduced antimicrobial use. To achieve this, we need to rewire food systems in ways that enhance transparency between producers and consumers, mobilize key actors to become biosphere stewards, and re-connect people to the biosphere

  • 34.
    Grift, Jeroen
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Land management, GIS.
    Forest Change Mapping in Southwestern Madagascar using Landsat-5 TM Imagery, 1990 –20102016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The main goal of this study was to map and measure forest change in the southwestern part of Madagascar near the city of Toliara in the period 1990-2010. Recent studies show that forest change in Madagascar on a regional scale does not only deal with forest loss, but also with forest growth However, it is unclear how the study area is dealing with these patterns. In order to select the right classification method, pixel-based classification was compared with object-based classification. The results of this study shows that the object-based classification method was the most suitable method for this landscape. However, the pixel-based approaches also resulted in accurate results. Furthermore, the study shows that in the period 1990–2010, 42% of the forest cover disappeared and was converted into bare soil and savannahs. Next to the change in forest, stable forest regions were fragmented. This has negative effects on the amount of suitable habitats for Malagasy fauna. Finally, the scaling structure in landscape patches was investigated. The study shows that the patch size distribution has long-tail properties and that these properties do not change in periods of deforestation.

  • 35.
    Hillman, Karl
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Environmental engineering.
    Damgaard, Anders
    Department of Environmental Engineering, DTU Environment, Technical University of Denmark.
    Eriksson, Ola
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Environmental engineering.
    Jonsson, Daniel
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Environmental engineering.
    Fluck, Lena
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Environmental engineering.
    Climate Benefits of Material Recycling: Inventory of Average Greenhouse Gas Emissions for Denmark, Norway and Sweden2015Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this project is to compare emissions of greenhouse gases from material recycling with those from virgin material production, both from a material supply perspective and from a recycling system perspective. The method for estimating emissions and climate benefits is based on a review, followed by a selection, of the most relevant publications on life cycle assessment (LCA) of materials for use in Denmark, Norway and Sweden. The proposed averages show that emissions from material recycling are lower in both perspectives, comparing either material supply or complete recycling systems. The results can be used by companies and industry associations in Denmark, Norway and Sweden to communicate the current climate benefits of material recycling in general. They may also contribute to discussions on a societal level, as long as their average and historic nature is recognised.

  • 36.
    Hillman, Karl
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Environmental engineering.
    Rickne, Annika
    University of Gothenburg.
    Balancing Variety Creation and Selection: Governing Biofuels in Sweden 1990-20102012In: Paving the Road to Sustainable Transport: Governance and innovation in low-carbon vehicles / [ed] Måns Nilsson, Karl Hillman, Annika Rickne, Thomas Magnusson, Routledge, 2012, 1, p. 235-259Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Hollander, Ernst
    KTH, Industriell ekonomi och organisation.
    Varför var det så segt?: om lågriskkemi, miljödriven innovation och kravformning1995Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Iguchi, Masahiko
    et al.
    Tokyo Institute of Technology.
    Hillman, Karl
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Environmental engineering.
    The Development of Fuel Economy Regulation for Passenger Cars in Japan2012In: Paving the Road to Sustainable Transport: Governance and innovation in low-carbon vehicles / [ed] Måns Nilsson, Karl Hillman, Annika Rickne, Thomas Magnusson, Routledge, 2012, 1, p. 57-74Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Isendahl, Christian
    et al.
    Göteborgs Universitet.
    Barthel, Stephan
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Environmental engineering.
    Archeology, history, and urban food security: integrating cross-cultural and long-term perspectives2018In: Routledge Handbook of Landscapes and Food / [ed] Joshua Zeunert and Tim Waterman, New York: Routledge, 2018, 1, p. 61-73Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Ives, Christopher D.
    et al.
    School of Geography, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham, United Kingdom; Faculty of Sustainability, Leuphana University, Lueneburg, Germany.
    Giusti, Matteo
    Stockholm Resilience Centre, Sweden.
    Fischer, Joern
    Faculty of Sustainability, Leuphana University, Lueneburg, Germany.
    Abson, David J.
    Faculty of Sustainability, Leuphana University, Lueneburg, Germany.
    Klaniecki, Kathleen
    Faculty of Sustainability, Leuphana University, Lueneburg, Germany.
    Dorninger, Christian
    Faculty of Sustainability, Leuphana University, Lueneburg, Germany.
    Laudan, Josefine
    Faculty of Sustainability, Leuphana University, Lueneburg, Germany.
    Barthel, Stephan
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Environmental engineering. Stockholm Resilience Centre, Sweden.
    Abernethy, Paivi
    Faculty of Sustainability, Leuphana University, Lueneburg; Germany Royal Roads University, Victoria, BC, Canada.
    Martín-López, Berta
    Faculty of Sustainability, Leuphana University, Lueneburg, Germany.
    Raymond, Christopher M.
    Department of Landscape Architecture, Planning and Management, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Kendal, David
    School of Ecosystem and Forest Sciences & Melbourne School of Design, The University of Melbourne, Australia.
    von Wehrden, Henrik
    Faculty of Sustainability, Leuphana University, Lueneburg, Germany.
    Human–nature connection: a multidisciplinary review2017In: Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability, ISSN 1877-3435, E-ISSN 1877-3443, Vol. 26-27, p. 106-113Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In sustainability science calls are increasing for humanity to (re-)connect with nature, yet no systematic synthesis of the empirical literature on human–nature connection (HNC) exists. We reviewed 475 publications on HNC and found that most research has concentrated on individuals at local scales, often leaving ‘nature’ undefined. Cluster analysis identified three subgroups of publications: first, HNC as mind, dominated by the use of psychometric scales, second, HNC as experience, characterised by observation and qualitative analysis; and third, HNC as place, emphasising place attachment and reserve visitation. To address the challenge of connecting humanity with nature, future HNC scholarship must pursue cross-fertilization of methods and approaches, extend research beyond individuals, local scales, and Western societies, and increase guidance for sustainability transformations.

  • 41.
    Jakobsson, Sonny
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Department of Business Administration and Economics, Ämnesavdelningen för företagsekonomi.
    Fregidou-Malama, Maria
    University of Gävle, Department of Business Administration and Economics, Ämnesavdelningen för företagsekonomi.
    Ditt Val Spelar Roll: Gävleborgs konsumenters attityder till lokalproducerade livsmedel2005Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Johansson, Lisa
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering.
    Miljöförutsättningar vid anläggande av snödeponi: Utvärdering av potentiella platser för ny snödeponi i Gävle2017Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In wintertime, a large amount of snow falls on roads, streets and parking lots in Gävle. Snow from urban areas may contain pollutants from sources such as atmospheric contamination, traffic emission and de-icing chemicals. These pollutants accumulate in the snow during the winter and are released when the snow melts in the spring and summer. Besides logistic and traffic safety, snow-handling strategies are an important issue for the municipal organization in terms of environmental effects from the melt water.

    Today, snow plowed in urban areas of Gävle are being transported to a snow deposit in the harbor of Gävle, Gävle hamn. In the future, the current location are going to be used by Gävle hamn. Therefore, the municipality of Gävle are looking at five different alternatives for localization of snow deposit.

    To determine which of the five alternative locations are suitable for construction of snow deposit in terms of environmental conditions, this study examines the different locations in terms of recipient, geology, biological consequences, land use and surroundings.

    If one large snow deposit, designed similar to the current one in Gävle hamn, is chosen to solve the snow handling in the future, location number 3 Ersbo syd would be the best option. Location 1 Fredriksskans, 2 Duvbacken and 5 Kungsbäck, has god potential to alone and/or in combination with another location, serve as area for snow deposit. Location number 4, Ersbo telepylon, should not be considered as an alternative location for a snow deposit.

    There are possibilities for unconventional solutions, such as district cooling or even use the snow to infiltrate in the ridge, the chance to reverse the snow-handling problem to a resource is great. Creative solutions could be a possibility to cover and prepare for the eventual environmental challenges the future may bring.      

  • 43.
    Jönsson, Petra
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building Engineering, Energy Systems and Sustainability Science, Environmental Science.
    Mattsson, Julia
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building Engineering, Energy Systems and Sustainability Science, Environmental Science.
    "Jag har inget emot kollektivtrafiken om jag säger så, men...": En kvalitativ studie om män och kvinnors resvanor och inställningar till arbetspendling2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The traffic sector is responsible for the greatest amount of greenhouse emissions in Sweden because of its combustion of fossil fuels. Sandviken is the municipality in Gävleborg county that uses the least amount of public transportation in form of bus traffic. The aim of this study is to gain an understanding through qualitative research how the individual looks and reflects upon their own commuting, and to identify which factors that mostly affects the individuals commuting habits. The study is geo-graphically delimited to look to Sandbacka Park. The amount of interview partici-pants was in total 18, seven women and eleven men. The main themes that could be identified from the interviews was stress, environmental awareness, flexibility, effi-ciency and control. The average distance to the workplace was about 19,25 km. In total stated 73% of men and 57% of women that car was the main mode of transport to the workplace. This means that more men than women travelled by car to the workplace, and also show more positive feeling to car use. Many of the par-ticipants of the interview had knowledge of climate change and the connection it has to transportation but could still defend their own individual car use. Some of the men that were interviewed claimed to have a greater need of flexibility and maintain status, which can be an explanation as to why the need of car use is greater with men than women. 42% of women and 27% of men commutes which more sustainable modes of transportation, such as public transportation and walking or bicycling. Two of the women who commuted with public transportation expressed content with their mode of transportation. They had also during the interviews mentioned an environmental awareness, which shows that there is a connection between mak-ing sustainable choices and being content with the chosen more sustainable mode of transportation. The results from Sandbacka Park is generalizable to other work-places with the same kind of prerequisites. This study shows that men have more positive emotions connected to car use and uses the car more as a mode of commut-ing to work. During future studies it may be of importance to focus more on longer interviews timewise to create an even greater understanding of the individuals need and prerequisites when commuting. With a greater sample size a more generalisable result could have been achieved.Key words: Commuting, stress, public transportation, commute mode, travel mode choice, gender

  • 44.
    Larsson, Josefine
    et al.
    Södertörns högskola, Miljövetenskap.
    Lind, E. E.
    SLU.
    Corell, H.
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Grahn, Mats
    Södertörns högskola, Biologi.
    Smolarz, K.
    University of Gdańsk, Gdynia, Poland.
    Lönn, Mikael
    Södertörns högskola, Biologi.
    Regional genetic differentiation in the blue mussel from the Baltic Sea area2017In: Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science, ISSN 0272-7714, E-ISSN 1096-0015, Vol. 195, p. 98-109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Connectivity plays an important role in shaping the genetic structure and in evolution of local adaptation. In the marine environment barriers to gene flow are in most cases caused by gradients in environmental factors, ocean circulation and/or larval behavior. Despite the long pelagic larval stages, with high potential for dispersal many marine organisms have been shown to have a fine scale genetic structuring. In this study, by using a combination of high-resolution genetic markers, species hybridization data and biophysical modeling we can present a comprehensive picture of the evolutionary landscape for a keystone species in the Baltic Sea, the blue mussel. We identified distinct genetic differentiation between the West Coast, Baltic Proper and Bothnian Sea regions, with lower gene diversity in the Bothnian Sea. Oceanographic connectivity together with salinity and to some extent species identity provides explanations for the genetic differentiation between the West Coast and the Baltic Sea (Baltic Proper and Bothnian Sea). The genetic differentiation between the Baltic Proper and Bothnian Sea cannot be directly explained by oceanographic connectivity, species identity or salinity, while the lower connectivity to the Bothnian Sea may explain the lower gene diversity. © 2016.

  • 45.
    Larsson, Josefine
    et al.
    Södertörns högskola, Miljövetenskap.
    Lönn, Mikael
    Södertörns högskola, Biologi.
    Lind, Emma E
    SLU.
    Świeżak, Justyna
    University of Gdansk, Gdynia , Poland.
    Smolarz, Katarzyna
    University of Gdansk, Gdynia , Poland.
    Grahn, Mats
    Södertörns högskola, Biologi.
    Sewage treatment plant associated genetic differentiation in the blue mussel from the Baltic Sea and Swedish west coast2016In: PeerJ, ISSN 2167-8359, E-ISSN 2167-8359, Vol. 4, article id e2628Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Human-derived environmental pollutants and nutrients that reach the aquatic environment through sewage effluents, agricultural and industrial processes are constantly contributing to environmental changes that serve as drivers for adaptive responses and evolutionary changes in many taxa. In this study, we examined how two types of point sources of aquatic environmental pollution, harbors and sewage treatment plants, affect gene diversity and genetic differentiation in the blue mussel in the Baltic Sea area and off the Swedish west coast (Skagerrak). Reference sites (REF) were geographically paired with sites from sewage treatments plant (STP) and harbors (HAR) with a nested sampling scheme, and genetic differentiation was evaluated using a high-resolution marker amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP). This study showed that genetic composition in the Baltic Sea blue mussel was associated with exposure to sewage treatment plant effluents. In addition, mussel populations from harbors were genetically divergent, in contrast to the sewage treatment plant populations, suggesting that there is an effect of pollution from harbors but that the direction is divergent and site specific, while the pollution effect from sewage treatment plants on the genetic composition of blue mussel populations acts in the same direction in the investigated sites.

  • 46.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Institutionalising sustainability in HEIs: Experiences from the University of Gävle2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 47.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Reinforcing the holistic perspective of sustainability: Analysis of the importance of sustainability drivers in organisations2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    State of the art on sustainable business models: A discussion on sustainable business models : Providing a more holistic perspective on sustainable business models2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 49.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Reid, Angus
    Investors, Electricity Utility Companies, and Transformative Change in Europe2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Nilsson, Måns
    et al.
    Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Hillman, Karl
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Environmental engineering.
    Magnusson, Thomas
    Linköping University.
    How do we govern sustainable innovations? Mapping patterns of governance for biofuels and hybrid-electric vehicle technologies2012In: Environmental Innovation and Societal Transitions, ISSN 2210-4224, Vol. 3, p. 50-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines patterns of governance aimed at sustainable technological innovation in the transport sector. It makes an overall assessment of governance emerging in the fields of biofuel and hybrid-electric vehicle (HEV) technologies, and makes a classification of its characteristics. It examines the role of different actors and levels of governance as well as preferred mechanisms and targets of governance. The assessment reveals that there are rather differential patterns of governance influencing the two fields. For instance, international-level and market-based governance are much more prevalent in biofuels, whereas industry-led and cognitive governance play comparatively stronger roles in HEV. These patterns can be understood in light of both the different institutional and actor characteristics of the two technologies, and their positions in relation to socio-technical regimes.

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