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  • 1.
    Granqvist, Claes-Göran
    et al.
    Department of Materials Science, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Azens, A.
    Department of Materials Science, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Isidorsson, Jan
    Department of Materials Science, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Kharrazi, M.
    Department of Materials Science, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Kullman, Lisen
    Department of Materials Science, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Lindström, T.
    Department of Materials Science, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Niklasson, Gunnar A.
    Department of Materials Science, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Ribbing, Carl-Gustaf
    Department of Materials Science, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Rönnow, Daniel
    Department of Materials Science, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Strömme, Maria
    Department of Materials Science, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Veszelei, M.
    Department of Materials Science, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Towards the smart window: progress in electrochromics1997In: Journal of Non-Crystalline Solids, ISSN 0022-3093, E-ISSN 1873-4812, Vol. 218, p. 273-279Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Electrochromic devices have the ability to produce reversible and persistent changes of their optical properties. The phenomenon is associated with joint ion and electron transport into/out of an electrochromic thin film, in most cases being a transition metal oxide. This paper outlines the various applications of such devices in smart windows suitable for energy-conscious architecture, in variable-reflectance mirrors, and in display devices. Critical materials issues and design concepts are discussed. The paper also covers two specific research topics: computed electronic structure of crystalline WO3 incorporating ionic species, showing how reflectance modulation emerges from a first-principles calculation; and Li+ dynamics in heavily disordered Ti oxide, illustrating how diffusion constants derived from impedance spectroscopy can be reconciled with the Anderson—Stuart model.

  • 2.
    Niklasson, Gunnar A.
    et al.
    Department of Materials Science, The Ångström Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Rönnow, Daniel
    Department of Materials Science, The Ångström Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Institute of Optical Research, Electrum, Kista, Sweden.
    Strömme, Maria
    Department of Materials Science, The Ångström Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Kullman, Lisen
    Department of Materials Science, The Ångström Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Hans
    Department of Materials Science, The Ångström Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Roos, Arne
    Department of Materials Science, The Ångström Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Surface roughness of pyrolytic tin dioxide films evaluated by different methods2000In: Thin Solid Films, ISSN 0040-6090, E-ISSN 1879-2731, Vol. 359, no 2, p. 203-209Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The scaling of surface roughness in thin spray pyrolyzed fluorinated tin dioxide films of different thicknesses was obtained from atomic force microscopy. The data show that, within experimental uncertainties, the effective dimensionality of the surface is 2; hence no evidence of fractal surface roughness was found. Other methods – based upon light scattering and cyclic voltammetry – gave additional information on the surface topography. Cyclic voltammetry measurements show that the reaction sites on the surface are distributed in a fractal structure and may be identified with hillocks seen in surface reliefs.

  • 3.
    Sattari, Amir
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Building science - installation technology.
    Ahmadi Moghaddam, Elham
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Sandberg, Mats
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Building science - installation technology.
    Industrial nanoparticles health risks and advantages of a decent industrial ventilation system in reducing the related risks2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the fast-growing use of nanoparticles (NPs) in a wide range of production andmanufacturing processes, and great health and environmental risks associated to NPs, it is important totreat the industry-produced NPs in a proper way. Ventilation of industrial workplaces lies within theconcept of sustainability challenges for the development of nanoproducts. Due to the decreased grainsize of material to nano limits and thus the appearance of either new or changed properties, health riskof workers in such environments is critical concerning the complicated and unknown characteristicsof nanoparticles. There is great evidence over the past few years that ultrafine particles and especiallyNPs in the breathing air are strong toxins. Different mitigation measures for air-borne nanoparticles inindustrial workplaces are substitution, engineering controls such as ventilation and provision of personalprotective equipment. In this paper selection criteria for ventilation systems and different ventilationmethods (hood ventilation and global enclosure/room ventilation systems) as engineering controlsof nanoparticles within industrial enclosures will be reviewed. Novel methods for improvement ofventilation efficiency in general and industrial work places with an eye on ventilation of nanoparticleswill be presented.

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