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  • 1.
    Candell, Agneta
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science.
    Engström, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science. Uppsala universitet.
    Dental hygienists’ work environment: motivating, facilitating, but also trying2010In: International Journal of Dental Hygiene, ISSN 1601-5029, E-ISSN 1601-5037, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 204-212Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study was to describe dental hygienists' experiences of their physical and psychosocial work environment. The study was descriptive in design and used a qualitative approach. Eleven dental hygienists participated in the study and data were collected during spring 2008 using semi-structured interviews. The material was analysed using qualitative content analysis. The results showed that the dental hygienists experienced their work environment as motivating and facilitating, but at the same time as trying. The three categories revealed a theme: Being controlled in a modern environment characterized by good relationships. Motivating factors were the good relationship with co-workers, managers and patients, seeing the results of your work, having your own responsibility and making your own decisions. The new, pleasant and modern clinics, good cooperation between co-workers and varying duties were described as facilitating factors. The trying factors, as described by the dental hygienists, were above all being controlled by time limits or by some elements of the work, such as teamwork. The dental hygienists also felt stress because appointments were too-short. To conclude, the participants described their work environment as trying in several ways, despite the modern clinics and good relationships.

  • 2.
    Jansson, Tove
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development.
    Saad, Neimo
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development.
    "Challenges when implementing standardized and processes within a customer service unit"2010Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

     

    Abstract

     

     

    Interest in Lean grows and spreads to the public from industrial and service sectors. Lean is currently used in administrative processes and it is called Administration but can administration be Lean? The aim of our study is to develop a useful model for a successful implementation of Lean Administration by using various scientific articles, books and information from the case study.

    The part of the purpose is to: • Identify critical success factors that arise• Identify the challenges arising from the implementation of Lean Administration.We have studied a Division within Distribution at GE Healthcare in Uppsala. The model that we have developed provides challenges and success factors for a successful implementation.

    In order to succeed in implementation, a culture that promotes continuous improvement must exist in the organization. A key success factor is to understand Lean Administrations structure and principles. Having a supportive leadership is a matter of course as well as having a secure and stable environment.

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  • 3.
    Lövgren, Anna
    et al.
    Clinical Oral Physiology, Department of Odontology Faculty of Medicine, University of Umeå, Umeå, Sweden.
    Österlund, Catharina
    Clinical Oral Physiology, Department of Odontology Faculty of Medicine, University of Umeå, Umeå, Sweden.
    Lampa, Ewa
    Clinical Oral Physiology, Department of Odontology Faculty of Medicine, University of Umeå, Umeå, Sweden.
    Ilgunas, Aurelija
    Clinical Oral Physiology, Department of Odontology Faculty of Medicine, University of Umeå, Umeå, Sweden.
    Hellström, Fredrik
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    A high prevalence of TMD is related to somatic awareness and pain intensity among healthy dental students2018In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 76, no 6, p. 387-393Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Dental students have been identified as a group with high risks of developing both temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and psychosocial conditions. Our primary aim was to evaluate the cross-sectional prevalence of TMD diagnoses, as defined in the Diagnostic Criteria (DC)/TMD, among dental students. The secondary aim was to evaluate the prevalence and association of behavioural and psychosocial factors in relation to DC/TMD diagnoses.

    Materials and methods: The study was conducted among undergraduate dental students during the second semester of their third year at the Department of Odontology, Medical Faculty, Umeå University, Sweden. Three consecutive cohorts were recruited during August in 2013, 2014, 2015. In total, 54 students were included and examined according the DC/TMD procedure.

    Results and conclusions: The prevalence of any DC/TMD diagnosis was 30%. The most prevalent TMD diagnosis was myalgia. Individuals with a TMD-pain diagnosis (i.e. myalgia or arthralgia) reported significantly higher pain intensity levels according to the Graded Chronic Pain Scale (GCPS) as compared to individuals without TMD-pain (Fisher’s exact test p < .001, two-sided). In addition, individuals with any TMD scored significantly higher jaw functional limitations according to the Jaw Functional Limitation Scale 20 (JFLS-20, p < .001) and oral parafunctions according to the Oral Behavior Checklist (OBC, p = .005) as compared to individuals without TMD. The psychosocial factors evaluated did not differ between individual with or without a TMD diagnosis. The majority of the dental students reported symptoms that are already identified as risk factors for developing TMD and pain conditions. However, longitudinal data are needed to evaluate how this evolves over time.

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