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  • 1.
    Aasa, Ulrika
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Jensen, B R
    Sandfeld, J
    Lyskov, Eugene
    University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Richter, Hans O
    University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Crenshaw, Albert
    University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    The impact of computer mouse work with different size objects on subjective perception of fatigue and performance2007In: 39th Annual Congress of the Nordic Ergonomics Society, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Aasa, Ulrika
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Kalezic, Nebojsa
    University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Lyskov, Eugene
    University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Ängquist, Karl-Axel
    Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, University of Umeå, Umeå, Sweden.
    Barnekow-Bergkvist, Margareta
    University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Stress monitoring of ambulance personnel during work and leisure time2006In: International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, ISSN 0340-0131, E-ISSN 1432-1246, Vol. 80, no 1, 51-59 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The aim of the present study was to assess physiological and subjective stress markers during a 24-h ambulance work shift and during the next two work-free days, and relate these parameters to self-reported health complaints. Methods: Twenty-six ambulance personnel were followed during a 24-h work shift and during the next two work-free days with electrocardiogram, cortisol assessments and diary notes. The ambulance personnel also performed tests of autonomic reactivity before and at the end of the work shift. The subjects were categorized into two groups according to their number of health complaints. Results: In general, stress markers did not show differences between the work shift and leisure time. However, a modest deviation in heart rate variability pattern and higher morning cortisol values during work in comparison with work-free days were observed in personnel with many health complaints. Conclusions: Subjective and physiological characteristics of ambulance personnel did not indicate distinctive stress during the 24-h work shift. Relationships between frequent health complaints and specific work-related factors require further prospective studies.

  • 3.
    Aasa, Ulrika
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research. Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, physiotherapy, University of Umeå, Umeå, Sweden.
    Ängquist, Karl-Axel
    Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, University of Umea ̊ , Sweden.
    Barnekow-Bergkvist, Margareta
    University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    The effects of a 1-year physical exercise programme on development of fatigue during a simulated ambulance work task2008In: Ergonomics, ISSN 0014-0139, E-ISSN 1366-5847, Ergonomics, Vol. 51, no 8, 1179-1194 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of individually prescribed physical exercise programmes on development of fatigue during the carrying of a loaded stretcher up and down the stairs. Nineteen ambulance personnel performed the training for 1 year. Testing occurred before and after 1 year of the training. Both the training group (n = 19) and the control group (n = 15) were assessed for physical capacity and lactate concentration in blood and ratings of perceived exertion during carrying a stretcher on the stairs. When comparisons were made between those who had been training three times/week for 1 year and the control group, lactate concentration was significantly decreased. In conclusion, markers of fatigue during stretcher carrying can be reduced by the use of individually prescribed physical exercise programmes.

  • 4.
    Aleksandrov, A. A.
    et al.
    St Petersburg State University, Russia.
    Deinekina, T. S.
    St Petersburg State University, Russia.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Lyskov, Eugene B.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    ВЛИЯНИЕ НАБЛЮДЕНИЯ ЗА ДВИЖЕНИЕМ НА ВОССТАНОВЛЕНИЕ РАБОТОСПОСОБНОСТИ ПОСЛЕ ФИЗИЧЕСКОГО УТОМЛЕНИЯ [The influence of movement's observation on recuperation after physical fatigue]2014In: Zurnal vyssej nervnoj deâtel'nosti im. I.P. Pavlova, ISSN 0044-4677, Vol. 64, no 5, 481-487 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study aim was to investigate effects of mental activity, accompanied by mu-rhythm depression, on recuperation after physical fatigue. In a study participants performed 11 one minute bouts of static hand grip intermitted by 2 minutes rest pauses. During pauses participants watched video with either dynamic hand grips (biological movements) or deformation of geometric figure (control). Obtained data showed there was a significant depression of mu-rhythm during biological movement's observation. There was significant fatigue of subjects in an exercise with physical activity, but there was no reliable influence of performed mental activity on recovery after fatigue.

  • 5.
    Andersson, Linus
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research. University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science.
    Claeson, Anna-Sara
    Department of Psychology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Dantoft, Thomas Meinertz
    Danish Research Centre for Chemical Sensitivities, Copenhagen University Hospital Gentofte, Gentofte, Denmark; Department of Systems Biology, Center for Biological Sequence Analysis, Technical University of Denmark, Lyngby, Denmark.
    Skovbjerg, Sine
    Danish Research Centre for Chemical Sensitivities, Copenhagen University Hospital Gentofte, Gentofte, Denmark.
    Lind, Nina
    Department of Psychology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Nordin, Steven
    Department of Psychology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Chemosensory perception, symptoms and autonomic responses during chemical exposure in multiple chemical sensitivity2016In: International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, ISSN 0340-0131, E-ISSN 1432-1246, Vol. 89, no 1, 79-88 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: Multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS) is a prevalent medically unexplained symptom characterized by symptom reactions to everyday chemical exposure below hygienic thresholds. The aim of this study was to investigate the expressions of hyper-reactivity in MCS during whole-body exposure to low concentrations of the odorant n-butanol.

    METHODS: We exposed 18 participants with MCS and 18 non-ill controls to a low concentration of the odorant n-butanol using an exposure chamber. The first 10 min constituted blank exposure, after which the n-butanol concentration increased and reached a plateau at 11.5 mg/m(3).

    RESULTS: MCS participants, compared with controls, reported greater perceived odor intensities, more unpleasantness to the exposure and increasing symptoms over time. MCS participants also expressed higher pulse rate and lower pulse rate variability than controls did. No group differences were found for breathing rate or tonic electrodermal activity responses.

    CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that MCS sufferers differ from healthy controls in terms of autonomic responses, symptoms and chemosensory perception during chemical exposure.

  • 6.
    Andersson, Linus
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Claeson, Anna-Sara
    Department of Psychology, Umeå University, Sweden.
    Sandberg, Petra
    Department of Psychology, Umeå University, Sweden.
    Highlighting the large variation in perceived properties of odors over time2017In: Chemical Senses, ISSN 0379-864X, E-ISSN 1464-3553, Vol. 42, no 2, E26- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Individuals differ considerably when rating the perceived properties of odors, especially over time. A second glance at previously published data-sets from our laboratory revealed that the same invariant exposure often produced both floor and roof effects. An odor that at the end of the exposure ses-sion was regarded as non-existent by one participant, could border the “absoulte maximum” rating category in another. We provide re-analyses from four exposure studies where we illustrate the perceptual variability over time, and outcomes associated with such ratings. We note that high, compared with low ratings of odor intensity over time is associated with ratings of unpleasantness and symptoms, but also with everyday distress, cognitive performance, autonomous nerv-ous system activity and deviating responses in the so-called pain or saliency matrix of the brain. We bring an open ques-tion to ECRO regarding how this considerable variability should be interpreted, and what the consequenced are for research and for setting exposure limits.

  • 7.
    Anderzén, Ingrid
    et al.
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University.
    Karlsson, Thomas
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Strömberg, Annika
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Social work.
    Gustafsson, Susanne
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Public health science.
    Lindberg, Per
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Predictors of Well-being at work2016In: Scientific Programme: Wellbeing at Work 2016, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The concept of healthy workplace has been defined as an organization that maximizes the integration of worker goals for wellbeing and company objectives for profitability and productivity. Conditions in today’s working life make new approaches necessary in order to limit negative health effects of work and to enhance wellbeing and health at work. About 24 % of the working population in Sweden report to have had work-related disorders during the last twelve months. In order to achieve a sustainable working life it is likely that strategies and actions from different and new angles are needed.ObjectivesThe present study is a part of a larger study (the GodA –study; a Swedish acronym for good work environments and healthy workplaces) and aims to investigate how work environment factors, work ability, work motivation, work and life balance predict well-being at work.

    Methods

    The GodA study is a 2-year follow up study in Sweden with a survey feedback design in three companies with both blue- and white collar workers. One of the companies serves as “intervention-company”, the other two as controls. A baseline questionnaire was sent out 2013 and the results from the survey were reported back to the companies, which have been processing their results. In spring 2015 a follow up survey has been administered. Data have been analysed with univariate and multivariate linear regression analyses.

    Results

    A baseline multivariate linear regression model, which included background factors, perceived psychosocial work climate and work environmental factors (motivation, leadership, employee responsibilities, efficacy, work ability and management committed to employee health) and work life balance, showed that psychosocial work climate (B= .48, 95% CI=.27 – .69) leadership, (B= .27, 95% CI=.05– .49), work ability (B= -.12, 95% CI= .03 – .21), motivation (B= -33, 95% CI= .14 – .51) and work life balance (B= -.34, 95% CI=-.57– -.12), were signifi-cantly associated with well-being at work and explained 40% of the variance (Adjusted R2=.40, p<.001).

    Conclusions

    Results showed that not only work environment factors are important predictors. To maintain a healthy work place a promotion of balance between work and private life is needed.

  • 8.
    Anderzén, Ingrid
    et al.
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University.
    Lindberg, Per
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Karlsson, Thomas
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Strömberg, Annika
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology.
    Gustafsson, Susanne
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences.
    Predictors of well-being at work2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    The concept of healthy workplace has been defined as an organization that maximizes the integration of worker goals for wellbeing and company objectives for profitability and productivity. Conditions in today’s working life make new approaches necessary in order to limit negative health effects of work and to enhance wellbeing and health at work. About 24 % of the working population in Sweden report to have had work-related disorders during the last twelve months. In order to achieve a sustainable working life it is likely that strategies and actions from different and new angles are needed.

    The present study is a part of a larger study (the GodA –study; a Swedish acronym for good work environments and healthy workplaces) and aims to investigate how work environment factors, work ability, work motivation, work and life balance predict well-being at work.

    Methods

    The GodA study is a 2-year follow up study in Sweden with a survey feedback design in three companies with both blue- and white collar workers. One of the companies serves as “intervention-company”, the other two as controls. A baseline questionnaire was sent out 2013 and the results from the survey were reported back to the companies, which have been processing their results. In spring 2015 a follow up survey has been administered. Data from the baseline measurements have been analysed with univariate and multivariate linear regression analyses.

    Results

    A baseline multivariate linear regression model, which included background factors, perceived psychosocial work climate and work environmental factors (motivation, leadership, employee responsibilities, efficacy, work ability and management committed to employee health) and work life balance, showed that psychosocial work climate (B= .48, 95% CI=.27 – .69) leadership, (B= .27, 95% CI=.05– .49), work ability  (B= -.12, 95% CI= .03 – .21), motivation (B= -33, 95% CI= .14 – .51) and work life balance (B= -.34, 95% CI=-.57– -.12), were significantly associated with well-being at work and explained 40% of the variance  (Adjusted R2=.40, p<.001). Results from the two-year follow up will be presented at the conference.

    Conclusions

    Results showed that not only work environment factors are important predictors. To maintain ahealthy work place apromotion ofbalancebetween workand private life is needed.

  • 9. Arlinger, Stig
    et al.
    Kjellberg, Anders
    University of Gävle, Department of Technology and Built Environment, Ämnesavdelningen för inomhusmiljö.
    Landström, Ulf
    University of Gävle, Department of Technology and Built Environment, Ämnesavdelningen för inomhusmiljö.
    Kähäri, Kim
    Hagerman, Björn
    Poulsen, Torben
    Bengtsson, Johanna
    Musik, musiker och hörsel: en kunskapssammanställning om höga ljudnivåer och hörselskaderisker i musik- och underhållningssektorn2007Report (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Arvidsson, Inger
    et al.
    Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Hansson, Gert-Ake
    Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Skerfving, Staffan
    Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Neck postures in air traffic controllers with and without neck/shoulder disorders2008In: Applied Ergonomics, ISSN 0003-6870, E-ISSN 1872-9126, Vol. 39, no 2, 255-260 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Prolonged computer work with an extended neck is commonly believed to be associated with an increased risk of neck-shoulder disorders. The aim of this study was to compare neck postures during computer work between female cases with neck-shoulder disorders, and healthy referents. Based on physical examinations, 13 cases and 11 referents were selected among 70 female air traffic controllers with the same computer-based work tasks and identical work stations. Postures and movements were measured by inclinometers, placed on the forehead and upper back (C7/Th1) during authentic air traffic control. A recently developed method was applied to assess flexion/extension in the neck, calculated as the difference between head and upper back flexion/extension. Results: Cases and referents did not differ significantly in neck posture (median neck flexion/extension: -10° vs. -9°; p=0.9). Hence, the belief that neck extension posture is associated with neck-shoulder disorders in computer work is not supported by the present data

  • 11.
    Arvidsson, Inger
    et al.
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Hansson, Gert-Åke
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research. University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science.
    Skerfving, Staffan
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Changes in physical workload with implementation of mouse-based information technology in air traffic control2006In: International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics, ISSN 0169-8141, E-ISSN 1872-8219, Vol. 36, no 7, 613-622 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Effects on physical workload were quantified when introducing new information technology in air traffic control. Seven female and seven male air traffic controllers were studied in an old control system, and during simulated - but similar - work in a new, mouse-based system. Postures, movements and muscular load were recorded (inclinometry for head, neck, back and upper arms; goniometry for wrists; electromyography for the trapezius and forearm extensor muscles). The new system was associated with lower movement velocities than the old one (examples; [50th percentiles] head flexion: 2 vs. 5 o/s, P<0.01; right arm elevation: 3 vs. 6 o/s; P<0.01; [90th percentile] wrist flexion: 19 vs. 50 o/s, P<0.01), less varying postures (head: 95th-5th percentile range 17° vs. 34o; P<0.01), and less muscular rest in the right forearm extensors (3.5 vs. 9% of time; P<0.05). The old/new system differences were amplified at high work intensities. The new air traffic control system caused a major change of physical exposures, probably associated with an increased risk of musculoskeletal disorders in arms and hands.

    Relevance to industry

    While this study concerned the specific changes in the introduction of a new air traffic control system, we believe that the findings are applicable to similar technological developments in other settings.

  • 12. Arvidsson, Inger
    et al.
    Hansson, Gert-Åke
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    University of Gävle, Belastningsskadecentrum.
    Skerfving, Staffan
    "Gamnacke" och nackbesvär vid datorarbete: finns det något samband?2005In: Svenska Läkaresällskapets Riksstämma, 2005Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Barbieri, Dechristian
    et al.
    Department of Physical Therapy, Federal University of São Carlos, São Paulo, BRAZIL.
    dos Santos, Wilian
    Department of Mechatronics Engineering, University of São Paulo, BRAZIL.
    Inoue, Roberto Santos
    Department of Electrical Engineering, Federal University of São Carlos, São Paulo, BRAZIL.
    Gonçalves Siqueira, Adriano Almeida
    Department of Mechatronics Engineering, University of São Paulo, BRAZIL.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Srinivasan, Divya
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Oliveira, Ana Beatriz
    Department of Physical Therapy, Federal University of São Carlos, São Paulo, BRAZIL.
    Adjustable sit-stand tables in office settings: development of a system for controlled posture changes2015In: Proceedings of the 19th Triennial Congress of the International Ergonomics Association, Melbourne 9-14 August 2015, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Barbieri, Dechristian Franca
    et al.
    Department of Physical Therapy, Federal University of São Carlos, Brazil.
    Srinivasan, Divya
    Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Oliveira, Ana Beatriz
    Department of Physical Therapy, Federal University of São Carlos, Brazil.
    Comparison of sedentary behaviors in office workers using sit-stand tables with and without semi-automated position changes2017In: Human Factors, ISSN 0018-7208, E-ISSN 1547-8181, Vol. 59, no 5, 782-795 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This study compared usage patterns of two different electronically controlled sit-stand tables during a 2-month intervention period among office workers.

    Background: Office workers spend most of their working time sitting, which is likely detrimental to health. Although the introduction of sit-stand tables has been suggested as an effective intervention to decrease sitting time, limited evidence is available on usage patterns of sit-stand tables, and whether patterns   are influenced by table configuration.

    Methods: Twelve workers were provided with standard sit-stand tables (non-automated table group) and 12 with semi-automated sit-stand tables programmed to change table position according to a pre-set pattern, if the user agreed to the system-generated prompt (semi-automated table group). Table position was monitored continuously for two months after introducing the tables, as a proxy for sit-stand behavior.

    Results: On average, the table was in a “sit” position for 85% of the work-day in both groups; this did not change significantly during the 2-month period. Switches in table position from sit to stand were, however, more frequent in the semi-automated table group than in the non-automated table group (0.65 vs. 0.29 hr-1; p=0.001).

    Conclusion: Introducing a semi-automated sit-stand table appeared to be an attractive alternative to a standard sit-stand table, since it led to more posture variation.

    Application: A semi-automated sit-stand table may effectively contribute to making postures more variable among office workers, and thus aid in alleviating negative health effects of extensive sitting.

  • 15.
    Barbieri, Dechristian
    et al.
    Department of Physical Therapy, Federal University of São Carlos.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Srinivasan, Divya
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    de Oliveira, Ana Beatriz
    Department of Physical Therapy, Federal University of São Carlos.
    The effect of non-computer tasks on job exposure variability in computer-intensive office work2013In: Eighth International Conference on Prevention of Work-related Musculoskeletal Disorders; Abstracts, 2013, 334- p.Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Barbieri, Dechristian
    et al.
    Department of Physical Therapy, Federal University of São Carlos, São Carlos, Brazil.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Srinivasan, Divya
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    dos Santos, Wilian Miranda
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of São Paulo, São Carlos, Brazil.
    Inoue, Roberto Santos
    Department of Electrical Engineering, Federal University of São Carlos, São Carlos, Brazil.
    Siqueira, Adriano
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of São Paulo, São Carlos, Brazil.
    Nogueira, Helen
    Department of Physical Therapy, Federal University of São Carlos, São Carlos, Brazil.
    Oliveira, Ana Beatriz
    Department of Physical Therapy, Federal University of São Carlos, São Carlos, Brazil.
    Sit-stand tables with semi-automated position changes: a new interactive approach for reducing sitting in office work2017In: IISE Transactions on Occupational Ergonomics and Human Factors, ISSN 2472-5838, Vol. 5, no 1, 39-46 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Introduction of sit-stand tables has been proposed as an initiative to decrease sedentary behavior among office workers and thus reduce risks of negative cardiometabolic health effects. However, ensuring proper and sustainable use of such tables has remained a challenge for successful implementation. Objective: We developed a new system to promote and sustain the use of sit-stand tables. Methods: The system was programmed to change the position of the table between “sit” and “stand” positions according to a regular pre-set pattern, if the user agreed to the system-generated prompts prior to each change. The user could respond to the system-generated prompts by agreeing, refusing or delaying the changes by 2 minutes. We obtained user compliance data when this system was programmed to a schedule of 10 minutes of standing after every 50 minutes of sitting. Compliance was investigated in nine office workers who were offered the semi-automated sit-stand table for two months. Results: On average, the system issued 12-14 alerts per day throughout the period. Average acceptance rate ranged from 75.0-82.4%, and refusal rate ranged from 11.8-10.1% between the first and eighth weeks of intervention (difference not statistically significant). During the first week after introduction, the table was in a standing position for 75.2 min on average, increasing slightly to 77.5 min in the eighth week. Conclusion: Since the workers were essentially sitting down before the table was introduced, these results suggest that the system was accepted well, and led to an effective reduction of sitting during working hours. Users also reported that the system contributed positively to their health and wellbeing, without interrupt their regular work, and that they would like to continue using the sit-stand table even beyond the two-month period, as part of their regular work. Compliance beyond two months of use, however, needs to be verified.

  • 17.
    Barbieri, Dechristian
    et al.
    Department of Physical Therapy, Federal University of São Carlos.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Srinivasan, Divya
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    dos Santos, Willian Miranda
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of São Paulo.
    Oliveira, Ana Beatriz
    Department of Physical Therapy, Federal University of São Carlos.
    Use of sit-stand stations during the first 2 months after their introduction2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. There is increasing evidence that sedentary behaviour during the workday is associated with negative health effects. In this context, interventions to reduce total sedentary time and breaking up periods of continuous sitting during computerized office work are urgently needed. Several reviews conclude that introducing sit-stand stations may lead to positive effects, but they also state that long-term interventions in real occu-pational settings are still rare. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate usage of sit-stand tables among Brazilian office workers during an intervention lasting two months.

    Methods.Nine office workers (6 females, 3 males; age 42 [SD 12] years) participated. The workers received traditional sit-stand tables and ergonomics information. They then used the workstation for two months. The tables were furnished with a system that recorded and kept track of table use during the intervention period. Table use early and late in the intervention period was compared using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test for repeated measurements.

    Results. In the beginning of the eight-week intervention period, workers, in median, changed table position 2.4 (1.9 – 4.7) times per day, decreasing to 2.3 (1.0 – 3.3) times at the end (P=0.09). Moreover, we also found a non-significant decrease in total time stand-ing per day, from 88.6 (67.4 – 94.3) minutes to 58.8 (33.1 – 95.7) minutes (P=0.31).

    Discussion. Two months after introducing sit-stand tables, some decrease in usage could be seen, if not statistically significant. Based on this, we emphasize that introduction of sit-stand tables should be accompanied by continued encouragement of the workers, preferably informed by a personalized follow up of actual use.

  • 18.
    Barbieri, Dechristian
    et al.
    Department of Physical Therapy, Federal University of São Carlos, São Paulo, Brazil.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Srinivasan, Divya
    Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, USA.
    Oliveira, Ana Beatriz
    Department of Physical Therapy, Federal University of São Carlos, São Paulo, Brazil.
    For sit-stand desks, semiautomated prompting may lead the way2017In: Industrial and Systems Engineering at Work, ISSN 2168-9210, Vol. 49, no 5, 51-52 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Barbieri, Dechristian
    et al.
    Department of Physical Therapy, Federal University of São Carlos.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Srinivasan, Divya
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Oliveira, Ana-Beatriz
    Department of Physical Therapy, Federal University of São Carlos.
    Reducing and breaking up sitting time during office work2017In: Industrial and Systems Engineering at Work, ISSN 2168-9210, Vol. 49, no 5, 51-52 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Dechristian, Svend Erik, Divya, Ana Beatriz andco-authors introduced a new semi-automated sit-stand table reducing sittingtime during office work and breaking it up into shorter periods. The system waswell accepted by the workers, and sustained use for two months was verified

  • 20.
    Barbieri, Dechristian
    et al.
    Universidade Federal de São Carlos.
    Srinivasan, Divya
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Nogueira, Helen
    Universidade Federal de São Carlos.
    Oliveira, Ana Beatriz
    Universidade Federal de São Carlos.
    The ability of non-computer tasks to increase biomechanical exposure variability in computer-intensive office work2015In: Ergonomics, ISSN 0014-0139, E-ISSN 1366-5847, Vol. 58, no 1, 50-64 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Postures and muscle activity in the upper body were recorded from 50 academics office workers during 2 hours of normal work, categorised by observation into computer work (CW) and three non-computer (NC) tasks (NC seated work, NC standing/walking work and breaks). NC tasks differed significantly in exposures from CW, with standing/walking NC tasks representing the largest contrasts for most of the exposure variables. For the majority of workers, exposure variability was larger in their present job than in CW alone, as measured by the job variability ratio (JVR), i.e. the ratio between min–min variabilities in the job and in CW. Calculations of JVRs for simulated jobs containing different proportions of CW showed that variability could, indeed, be increased by redistributing available tasks, but that substantial increases could only be achieved by introducing more vigorous tasks in the job, in casu illustrated by cleaning.

  • 21.
    Barbieri, Dechristian
    et al.
    Department of Physical Therapy, Federal University of São Carlos.
    Srinivasan, Divya
    Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Oliveira, Ana Beatriz
    Department of Physical Therapy, Federal University of São Carlos.
    Head, neck, trunk and upper extremity postures during sit-stand table use in real work settings2017Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study compared postures and posture variation of the head, neck, trunk and arms among 24 office workers after two months of sit-stand table use in real work settings. Postures were recorded for two hours on each of three consecutive days. On basis of observations, work tasks were categorized into computer work while standing (CW-stand), computer work while sitting (CW-sit), non-computer work while standing (NCW-stand) and non-computer work while sitting (NCW-sit). During CW-stand and NCW-stand, the head and neck were more flexed, the trunk less flexed, and both arms less elevated than when these tasks were performed sitting. Posture variation was consistently larger during sitting CW and NCW than during standing. Neutral postures occurred to a larger extent during standing. Shifting between sitting and standing will lead to increased posture variation for the trunk and upper body, which appears an additional benefit of introducing sit-stand tables to office workers.

  • 22.
    Barbieri, Dechristian
    et al.
    Department of Physical Therapy, Federal University of São Carlos, São Carlos, Brasil.
    Srinivasan, Divya
    Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia, USA.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research. University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science.
    Oliveira, Ana Beatriz
    Department of Physical Therapy, Federal University of São Carlos, São Carlos, Brasil.
    The effect of sit-stand workstations to decrease sedentariness in office work: tests of 2 systems with and without automatic reminders2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sedentary behaviors in office workers has become a major public health concern and several initiatives have been proposed to break up sedentary behavior patterns during the performance of computer-intensive office work. Among such initiatives, the use of sit-stand workstations has been suggested to be one of the most promising by recent reviews. However, there still is only limited scientific evidence showing how effective sit-stand workstations are, in reducing sedentary behaviors and also documentation of their sustainability of use in studies of regular office work (i.e. as the “newness” of the system wears off, with time since introduction). This study aimed to document user behaviors and compare the use of two sit-stand workstation based interventions among two groups of administrative office workers: an “autonomous” group in which these workstations were introduced following some general ergonomic guidelines, and another “feedback-system” group in which the sit-stand tables were furnished with a semi-automatic reminder system, programmed to raise the table to a high (i.e. standing) position for 10 minutes after every accumulated 50 minutes of the table being in a low (i.e. sitting) position, i.e. to result in about 83% sitting per day. In addition, the sustainability of the use of these two kinds of sit-stand workstation interventions over two continuous months since their introduction was also studied. The results averaged over two months of usage of the two interventions showed that the percentage (%) sitting time was 87.4 (84.9-89.2) on average in the autonomous group and 84.0 (83.5-85.4) on average in the feedback-system group (P=0.001), and the frequency of switches between sitting and standing was 0.3 (0.2-0.3) per hour in the autonomous group and 0.7 (0.6-0.7) per hour in the feedback-system group (P=0.001). Thus, the sit-stand table system integrated with the automatic reminder system led to more reduction in sitting time and more switches in posture between sitting and standing as compared to the traditional sit-stand table, and behaviors of both groups were seen to be sustained over the 2-month intervention period (no difference across time for any of the variables tested for any group).

  • 23.
    Barnekow-Bergkvist, Margareta
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Hedberg, Gudrun
    University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Pettersson, Ulf
    Sports Medicine Unit, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, University of Umeå, Umeå, Sweden; Clinical Pharmacology, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, University of Umeå, Umeå, Sweden.
    Lorentzon, R.
    Sports Medicine Unit, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, University of Umeå, Umeå, Sweden.
    Relationships between physical activity and physical capacity in adolescent females and bone mass in adulthood2006In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 16, no 6, 447-455 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates whether physical activity and physical performance in adolescence are positively related to adult bone mineral density (BMD). In 1974, physical activity, endurance, and muscular strength were measured in 204 randomly selected female students, age 16.1 +/- 0.3 year (range 15-17 years). Twenty years later, 36 of the women volunteered to undergo a measurement of their BMD. Women who were members in a sports club in adolescence had significantly higher adult BMD (mean differences of 5% to 17% depending on site) compared with subjects who were not engaged in a sports club. Furthermore, women with persistent weight-bearing activity in adulthood had significantly higher BMD compared with women who had stopped being active or had never been active. The differences ranged between 5% and 19% with the highest difference found in trochanter BMD. Stepwise regression analyses showed that membership in a sports club at baseline was a significant independent predictor of BMD in the total body, lumbar spine, legs, trochanter, and femoral neck, explaining 17-26% of the variation in BMD. Change in body weight was a strong independent predictor of BMD of the total body and arms, explaining 8% of the variation in both sites. In addition, running performance at baseline was an independent predictor of total body BMD, whereas the two-hand lift performance significantly predicted BMD of the total body, legs and trochanter. The hanging leg-lift and handgrip were both significant predictors of arm BMD. In conclusion, membership in a sports club and site-specific physical performance in adolescence together with the change in body weight were significantly associated with adult BMD in premenopausal women

  • 24.
    Basner, Mathias
    et al.
    Department of Psychiatry, Division of Sleep and Chronobiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA.
    Brink, Mark
    Federal Office for the Environment, Noise and NIR Division, Bern, Switzerland.
    Bristow, Abigail
    School of Civil and Building Engineering, Loughborough University, Loughborough, United Kingdom.
    de Kluizenaar, Yvonne
    Department of Urban Environment and Safety, The Netherlands Organization for Applied Scientific Research (TNO), Delft, Netherlands.
    Finegold, Lawrence
    Finegold & So, Consultants, 1167 Bournemouth Court, Centerville, Ohio 45459, USA.
    Hong, Jiyoung
    Eco-Transport Research Division, Korea Railroad Research Institute, Republic of Korea.
    Janssen, Sabine A.
    Department of Urban Environment and Safety, The Netherlands Organization for Applied Scientific Research (TNO), Delft, Netherlands.
    Klaeboe, Ronny
    Department of Safety, Security and Environment, Institute of Transport Economics (TØI), Oslo, Norway.
    Leroux, Tony
    School of Speech Language and Audiology, University of Montreal, Montréal (Québec), Canada.
    Liebl, Andreas
    Department of Acoustics, Fraunhofer Institute for Building Physics IBP, Stuttgart, Germany.
    Matsui, Toshihito
    Department of Environmental Engineering, Hokkaido University, Japan.
    Schwela, Dieter
    University of York, Environment Department, Stockholm Environment Institute, York, United Kingdom.
    Sliwinska-Kowalska, Mariola
    Department of Audiology and Phoniatrics, Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine, Poland.
    Sörqvist, Patrik
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Environmental psychology. Linnaeus Centre HEAD, Swedish Institute for Disability Research, University of Linköping, Linköping, Sweden.
    ICBEN Review of Research on the Biological Effects of Noise 2011-20142015In: Noise & Health, ISSN 1463-1741, E-ISSN 1998-4030, Vol. 17, no 75, 57-82 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The mandate of the International Commission on Biological Effects of Noise (ICBEN) is to promote a high level of scientific research concerning all aspects of noise-induced effects on human beings and animals. In this review, ICBEN team chairs and co-chairs summarize relevant findings, publications, developments, and policies related to the biological effects of noise, with a focus on the period 2011-2014 and for the following topics: Noise-induced hearing loss; nonauditory effects of noise; effects of noise on performance and behavior; effects of noise on sleep; community response to noise; and interactions with other agents and contextual factors. Occupational settings and transport have been identified as the most prominent sources of noise that affect health. These reviews demonstrate that noise is a prevalent and often underestimated threat for both auditory and nonauditory health and that strategies for the prevention of noise and its associated negative health consequences are needed to promote public health.

  • 25.
    Bergsten, Eva L
    University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research. University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences.
    Flygplanslastning –  ett samarbetsprojekt som leder till arbetsmiljöförbättringar2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Bergsten, Eva L
    et al.
    Arbets- och miljömedicin.
    Anundi, Helena
    Rehfisch, Pia
    Palm, Peter
    Hälsoeffekter och förebyggande arbete vid vibrationsexponering i saneringsföretag2013Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Den övergripande målsättningen med projektet var att få en ökad kunskap om hur saneringsföretag i Uppsala, Gävleborgs och Dalarnas län arbetar för att förebygga negativa hälsoeffekter av exponering av hand- arm vibrationer. Syftet med studien var att undersöka kunskapsläget angående risker med arbete med vibrerande verktyg, samarbetet med företagshälsovården och genomförande av medicinska kontroller hos saneringsföretag i regionen. Strukturerade telefonintervjuer med 15 saneringsföretag genomfördes. Ett samarbete med ett större saneringsföretag inleddes och medicinska undersökningar genomfördes på deras anställda av ergonom ute på arbetsplatsen. Aktiviteterna i projektet inspirerade företaget att själva initiera riskbedömningar och vibrationsmätningar som en start på ett eget förbättringsarbete. Intervjuerna visade att kunskapsläget i företagen angående regelverk och arbete med vibrerande verktyg var dåligt och trots att de flesta hade företagshälsovård så uttalades ett missnöje gentemot företagshälsovården angående stöd och information i dessa frågor. Bristfällig kunskap och svårigheter att tolka regelverket kan ligga bakom att det brister vad gäller riskbedömningar och lagstadgade medicinska kontroller i saneringsföretagen. Besvärsfrekvenserna i nacke och övre extremiteter hos sanerarna i det undersökta företaget var höga och det fanns också personer med tidiga tecken på kärl- och nervskador. Resultatet av det här projektet är ett litet komplement till den kunskap som redan finns på området men visar att det finns all anledning att lägga resurser på ett förebyggande arbete för den här yrkesgruppen som tidigare inte studerats i någon större utsträckning. Det finns ett outtalat behov av informations- och utbildningsinsatser på området som till stor del beror på okunskap hos företagen men kanske också hos företagshälsovården eftersom deras insatser ser ut att ha varit begränsade. En viktig följd av projektet var att det undersökta företaget på eget initiativ men med stöd av projektet initierade en arbetsgrupp och ett förebyggande arbete för att minska exponeringen för vibrationer. Detta arbete inkluderade riktlinjer för riskbedömningar och vibrationsmätningar av verktyg samt utbildning av ledning och personal. Projektets upplägg och innehåll lämpar sig således väl för att följas av företagshälsovård i deras arbete med att stötta sina kundföretag

  • 27.
    Bergsten, Eva L.
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Kwak, Lydia
    Unit of Intervention and Implementation Research for worker health, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Vingård, Eva
    Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Daily shoulder pain among flight baggage handlers and its association with work tasks and upper arm postures on the same day2017In: Annals of Occupational Hygiene, ISSN 0003-4878, E-ISSN 1475-3162Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: This study of flight baggage handlers aimed at examining the extent to which shoulder pain developed during single work shifts, and whether a possible development was associated with biomechanical exposures and psychosocial factors during the same shift.

    Methods: Data were collected during, in total, 82 work shifts in 44 workers. Right and left shoulder pain intensity was rated just before and just after the shift (VAS scale 0-100 mm). Objective data on time in extreme and time in neutral upper arm postures were obtained for the full shift using accelerometers, and the baggage handlers registered the number of aircrafts handled in a diary. During half of the shift, workers were recorded on video for subsequent task analysis of baggage handling. Influence at work and support from colleagues were measured by use of Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire (COPSOQ). Associations between exposures and the increase in pain intensity during the shift (daily pain) were analysed for the right and left shoulder separately using Generalized Estimating Equations (GEE).

    Results: Daily pain was observed in approximately one third of all shifts.  It was significantly associated with the number of aircrafts handled for both the right and left shoulder. In multivariate models including both biomechanical exposures and the psychosocial factors influence at work and support from colleagues, aircrafts handled was still significantly associated with daily pain in both shoulders, and so was influence and support, however in opposite directions.

    Conclusions: Daily pain was, in general, associated with biomechanical exposures during the same shift and with general influence and support in the job. In an effort to reduce pain among flight baggage handlers, it may therefore be justified to consider a reduction of biomechanical exposures during handling of aircrafts, combined with due attention to psychosocial factors at work.

  • 28.
    Bergsten, Eva L
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research. University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences.
    Palm, Peter
    Anundi, Helena
    Rehfisch, Pia
    Vibrationsexponering i saneringsföretag - Var är FHV?2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Bergsten, Eva
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Larsson, Johan
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Kwak, Lydia
    Unit of Intervention and Implementation Research, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Evaluation of an ergonomic intervention in Swedish flight baggage handlers2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Flight baggage handling is a worldwide occupation where baggage and cargo is sorted, loaded and unloaded on and off aircrafts. With the ultimate purpose of reducing and preventing musculoskeletal disorders among flight baggage handlers in Sweden, the Vocational Training and Working Environment Council (TYA) - a council formed by employers and unions in the Swedish transportation sector – initiated and implemented a project (2010-2012). This project revealed that ergonomics equipment was not used adequately, and this was considered a major factor of concern. Therefore, a training program was initiated 2014 in one handling company, aiming to improve ergonomics, behavior and attitudes. We evaluated the implementation process with regard to process items, intermediate outcomes, barriers and facilitators; for the purpose of gaining knowledge that could facilitate successful implementation in other handling companies. Methods: A mixed methods design was applied, based on qualitative and quantitative data. We evaluated six process items, recruitment, context, reach, dose delivered, dose received and satisfaction; intermediate outcomes of the intervention; skills, confidence and behaviour in the workforce; barriers and facilitators for successful implementation. Data was retrieved using company data, course evaluations, web questionnaires, and telephone interviews with company ‘observers’ and key persons. Preliminary results: The implementation process was judged to be feasible with regard to some of the process items. According to the informants, work place behaviour related to use of equipment had, however, not changed after the training period. Reported barriers were, 1) insufficient time and leader support for practicing new procedures during and after the training, 2) simultaneous reorganization of teams and work tasks, 3) lack of follow-up of the training, which would have supported good performance according to the informants. Conclusion: The implementation process was hampered by barriers, some of which could be addressed in future ergonomics training programs in other baggage handling companies.

  • 30.
    Bergsten, Eva
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Larsson, Johan
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Kwak, Lydia
    Unit of Intervention and Implementation Research, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet.
    Implementation of an ergonomics intervention in a Swedish flight baggage handling company - a process evaluation2017In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To conduct a process evaluation of the implementation of an ergonomics training program aimed at increasing the use of loading assist devices in flight baggage handling. Methods: Feasibility(recruitment, reach, context, dose delivered, dose received, satisfaction); intermediate outcomes (skills, confidence and behaviors); and barriers and facilitators of the training intervention were assessed by qualitative and quantitative methods. Results: Implementation proved feasible regarding dose delivered, dose received and satisfaction. Confidence among participants in the training program in using and talking about devices, observed use of devices among colleagues, and internal feedback on work behavior increased significantly (p<0.01). Main facilitators were self-efficacy, motivation, and perceived utility of training among the trainees. Barriers included lack of peer support, opportunities to observe and practice behaviors, and follow-up activities; as well as staff reduction and job insecurity. Conclusions: In identifying important barriers and facilitators for a successful outcome, our study can help supporting the effectiveness of future interventions. Our results show that barriers caused by organizational changes may likely be alleviated by recruiting motivated trainees and securing strong organizational support for the implementation.   

      

  • 31.
    Bergsten, Eva
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research. Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Vingård, Eva
    Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Psychosocial work factors and musculoskeletal pain: a cross-sectional study among Swedish flight baggage handlers2015In: BioMed Research International, ISSN 2314-6133, E-ISSN 2314-6141, Vol. 2015, 798042Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. Flight baggage handlers sort and load luggage to airplanes. This study aimed at investigating associations between psychosocial exposures and low back and shoulder musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) among Swedish flight baggage handlers.

    Methods. A questionnaire addressing MSDs (Standardized Nordic Questionnaire) and psychosocial factors (Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire, COPSOQ) was answered by 525 baggage handlers in six Swedish airports.

    Results. Low back (LBP) and shoulder pain (SP) was reported by 70% and 60%, respectively. Pain was reported to interfere with work (PIW) by 30% (low back) and 18% (shoulders), and intense pain (PINT) occurred in 34% and 28% of the population. Quality of leadership was the most dissatisfying psychosocial factor, while the most positive was social community at work. Low ratings in the combined domain Work organization and job content were significantly associated with PIW in both low back and shoulders (Adjusted Hazard Ratios 3.65 (95% CI 1.67-7.99) and 2.68 (1.09-6.61)) while lower ratings in the domain Interpersonal relations and leadership were associated with PIW LBP (HR 2.18 (1.06-4.49)) and PINT LBP and SP (HRs 1.95 (1.05-3.65) and 2.11 (1.08-4.12)).

    Conclusion. Severity of pain among flight baggage handlers was associated with psychosocial factors at work, suggesting that they may be a relevant target for intervention in this occupation.

  • 32.
    Bergsten, Eva
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research. University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. b Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research. University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science.
    Vingård, Eva
    Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Psychosocial work factors and musculoskeletal pain among Swedish flight baggage handlers2015In: Proceedings of the 19th Triennial Congress of the International Ergonomics Association, Melbourne, 9-14 August 2015 / [ed] Gitte Lindgaard & Dave Moore, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Flight baggage handlers are employed by handling companies engaged in sorting, loading and unloading luggage, cargo and mail, so called ramp service work. After check-in, luggage are transported through a sorting area and further out to the ramp. This transportation involves manual handling by baggage handlers at several stages, using conveyor belts, carts and trucks for transport. In addition to these tasks, baggage handlers are also engaged in communicating with air traffic controllers directing air traffic on the ground, towing aircrafts to gates and serving them with auxiliary power units, brakes and light. Baggage handling services are similar in all larger airports, and so baggage handlers perform similar tasks all over the world. In Sweden the handlers’ union claimed a high prevalence of low back and shoulder pain and a dissatisfying psychosocial work environment, but systematically collected empirical data were not available, and the literature was surprisingly sparse, considering that the occupation is global. Thus, a comprehensive project initiated by the Vocational Training and Working Environment Council, TYA, in Sweden - a council formed by employers’ and employees’ organizations in the transportation sector -was conducted at 14 handling companies in six Swedish airports between 2010 and 2012. The project aimed to document the physical and psychosocial work environment and to contribute to the development of ergonomic interventions within this occupation, which could, eventually, lead to better health among the employees. The present study was part of this project, in aiming at documenting psychosocial exposures and musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) in the flight baggage handler population, and at determining possible associations between exposures and disorders.

  • 33.
    Bergsten, Eva
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Vingård, Eva
    Uppsala University, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Alphonse, Erik
    The Vocational Training and Working Environment Council.
    Pettersson, Reidar
    The Vocational Training and Working Environment Council.
    Holmberg, Dan
    The Swedish Transport Workers Union.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Physical and psychosocial work conditions among baggage handlers in six Swedish airports2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    Flight baggage handlers are mainly engaged in sorting luggage or cargo, loading and unloading it to and from the airplanes. The Vocational Training and Working Environment Council, TYA - formed by employer’s and employee’s organizations in the transportation sector - initiated a scientific study in 2009 to investigate the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders and their suspected determinants in six Swedish airports involving a total of about 1000 handlers in 14 cargo- and handling companies. Encouraged by an initial literature review, the present field study was designed to contain qualitative, questionnaire-based, and observational surveys of working conditions, as well as extensive direct measurements of postures using full-shift inclinometry. This paper reports the design and results of the questionnaire part of the study.

    Method

    All baggage handlers working at least half-time (n=1044) were encouraged to fill in an extensive questionnaire handed out at the workplace by a research team member. In general the researcher collected the questionnaires at the same occasion. The questionnaire addressed general health, work capacity and physical exposures in relevant handling tasks. It also included a modified version of the Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire (COPSOQ), the Nordic Council of Minister’s Questionnaire (NMQ) on disorders, and the SOFI-questionnaire measuring perceived fatigue.

    Results

    The response rate was 73%. The prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders in the back, shoulders and wrists during the last 12 months was 70%, 60% and 45%. Positive effects of devices used for reducing perceived physical load were confirmed. The handlers expressed a low confidence in the leadership, and insufficient feedback, information and influence at work. Fatigue particularly occurred in the dimensions lack of energy and physical discomfort.

    Discussion

    The observed prevalence of low back pain (70%) is high, and in parity with results among nurses in Sweden (64%; Josephson et al. 1997) and China (56%; Smith et al. 2004). Further examination of questionnaires, interviews and direct posture measurements will identify determinants to consider for intervention to reduce the prevalence of disorders among the baggage handlers.

    Josephson M, et al. Occup Environ Med 1997;54:681-685.

    Smith DR, et al. Occup Med 2004;54:579-582

  • 34.
    Bergsten, Eva
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Zetterberg, Camilla
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Bjärntoft, Sofie
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Edvinsson, Johanna
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Hallman, David
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Kjellberg, Anders
    University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Larsson, Johan
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Jahncke, Helena
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Schemalagt arbete: Hälsofrämjande återhämtningsmönster i schemalagda arbeten: Kartläggning hösten 20162017Report (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Björklund, Martin
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Djupsjöbacka, Mats
    University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Crenshaw, Albert G
    University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Acute muscle stretching and shoulder position sense2006In: Journal of athletic training, ISSN 1062-6050, E-ISSN 1938-162X, Vol. 41, no 3, 270-274 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context: Stretching is common within sports as a potential maneuver for injury prevention. Stretching induced changes in muscle spindIe properties is a suggested mechanism. This may imply a reduction in proprioception following stretching, however, little is known of this association. Our finding showing no effect of acute stretching on shoulder position sense provides insight into this issue.

    Objectives: To evaluate if acute stretching of the shoulder muscles affects position sense.

    Design: A crossover design with subjects randomized to 3 groups, as regarded by the I sequence of 3 interventions.

    Setting: A university human research laboratory.

    Patients or Other participants: Nine female (age, 21 +2) and 9 male (24 + 3) healthy volunteers.

    lntervention(s): The interventions consisted of stretching of shoulder 1) agonists, 2) antagonists, and 3) non-stretching control.

    Main Outcome Measure(s): Position sense acuity of the right shoulder was determined before and arter the interventions by subjects at tempting to reproduce arm positions of 15° and 30° (shoulder adduction) while starting at 45° to the sagittal plane. The outcome variables were the response variability (variable error, VE) and overall accuracy (absolute error, AE).

    Results: A multivariate repeated measures analysis ofvariance revealed that the relative change in VE (i.e., VE after/VE before) was not significantly different between the interventions (p = 0.38). Similarly no change in AE was found (p = 0.76). Furthermore, there were no differences regarding test sequence or in the interaction 'intervention x sequence' for either VE (p = 0.73 and 0.53, respectively) or for AE (p = 0.71 and 0.67, respectively)

    Conclusions: The present study showed no effect on shoulder position sense after an acute bout of stretching either agonist or antagonist shoulder muscles.

  • 36.
    Björklund, Martin
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research. Alfta Research Foundation, Alfta, Sweden.
    Hamberg, Jern
    Alfta Research Foundation, Alfta, Sweden.
    Heiden, Marina
    University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Barnekow-Bergkvist, Margareta
    University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    The assessment of symptoms and functional limitations in low back pain patients: validity and reliability of a new questionnaire2007In: European spine journal, ISSN 0940-6719, E-ISSN 1432-0932, Vol. 16, no 11, 1799-1811 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many of the existing low back pain (LBP) questionnaires of function and symptoms have a content of different domains of disability presented as a single sum score, making it difficult to derive changes within a specific domain. The present study describes the development of a clinically derived back-specific questionnaire incorporating both a functional limitation and a symptom scale, with a further subdivision of the symptom scale in separate indices for severity and temporal aspects. The aims of the study were to assess the overall reliability and validity of the new questionnaire, named the Profile Fitness Mapping questionnaire (PFM). A total of 193 chronic LBP patients answered the PFM together with five validated criterion questionnaires. For the internal consistency of the questionnaires, the three indices of the PFM had the highest Cronbach's alpha (0.90-0.95) and all items had item-total correlations above 0.2. The correlation coefficients between the PFM and the back-specific criterion questionnaires ranged between 0.61 and 0.83, indicating good concurrent criterion validity. The best discriminative ability between patients with different pain severities was demonstrated by the functional limitation scale of the PFM. Well centered score distribution with no patient's score at the floor or the ceiling level indicates that the PFM has the potential to detect the improvement or worsening of symptoms and functional limitations in chronic LBP patients. Classification according to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and health (ICF) of WHO revealed a high degree of homogeneous item content of the symptom scale to the domain of impairments, and of the functional limitation scale to the domain of activity limitations. The present study suggests that the PFM has a high internal consistency and is a valid indicator of symptoms and functional limitations of LBP patients. It offers the combination of a composite total score and the possibility of evaluations within specific domains of disability. Complementary evaluation of test-retest reliability and responsiveness to change is warranted.

  • 37.
    Björklund, Martin
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research. University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences. Umea University, Dept of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation; Physiotherapy, Umeå, Sweden,.
    Tronarp, Rebecca
    Umea University, Dept of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation; Physiotherapy, Umeå, Sweden.
    Granås, Marie
    Umea University, Dept of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation; Physiotherapy, Umeå, Sweden.
    Dahlgren, Gunilla
    Umea University, Dept of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation; Physiotherapy, Umeå, Sweden.
    McDonough, Suzanne
    University of Ulster, UK.
    Nyberg, André
    Umea University, Dept of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation; Physiotherapy, Umeå, Sweden.
    Häger, Charlotte
    Umea University, Dept of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation; Physiotherapy, Umeå, Sweden.
    Office-cycling while working: An innovative concept to prevent and reduce musculoskeletal pain in office workers - a controlled feasibility study2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: According to the World Health Organization, WHO, a sedentary lifestyle is the single largest health risk for a number of diseases including musculoskeletal disorders and metabolic diseases. The negative health effects of excessive sitting are not compensated for by shorter bouts of increased physical activity. However, evidence shows that increased physical activity reduces musculoskeletal pain, which is very prevalent in those who are inactive. About 50-70 % of those who work at a computer report musculoskeletal pain and spend on average about 5 hours/day with very low energy metabolism. Work places are therefore an important arena for prevention and intervention by means of reducing sedentary time and increasing physical activity both for general health benefits and effects on the musculoskeletal pain.

    Purpose: To test the feasibility of office-cycling in an office work place and explore its potential effects on musculoskeletal pain in office workers.

    Methods: Twenty office workers (ages 27-61, 5 males) with musculoskeletal pain participated in this three-week controlled pilot field study. The intervention group (n=10), had access to an innovative customized cycle ergometer (OfficeBiking®) at their regular office workstation whilst performing their usual work tasks. Offie-cycling was an alternative to sitting/standing by their height adjustable office desk; they were instructed to bike as often as comfortable. The control group (n=10) was instructed to continue to work as usual. The experiences of office-cycling and how it influenced work performance was studied with a questionnaire. Musculoskeletal pain was evaluated using pain drawings and pain ratings and participants' total pain was calculated by adding each individuals' self-reported pain from their three most painful areas (NRS 0-10).

    Results: Importantly, office-cycling did not reduce self-reported work performance; the majority (9/10) would like daily access; and made suggestions to improve the user-friendliness of the bike. Office-cycling was used regularly (median, 11/15 workdays; median active time 59 min/day IQR 39;91). There was no observed difference regarding either number of self-reported areas of pain (NSAP) or general musculoskeletal pain (GMP) between the intervention group and the control group at baseline. Self-reported GMP decreased in 8 persons in the intervention group which was one more than in the control group (n=7). NSAP decreased in the intervention group (n=7; md -1,0 IQR -2,3;0,0); and the control group (n=5; md -0,5 IQR -1,3;0,3). The difference in total pain (intervention end-baseline) revealed a clinically important change in the intervention group (NRS -2,5, IQR -8,8;4,0) but not in the control group (NRS 0,0 IQR -6,2;2,5).

    Conclusions: The results suggest that office-cycling is a feasible method for use in work place interventions with some promising results. Future research suggestions are: underlying mechanisms regarding effects of physical activity on pain in parallel with controlled studies in laboratory environments to investigate dose-effects for metabolic expenditure and optimal pain reduction whilst office-cycling.

    Implications: The results in this feasibility study indicate a promising potential of the innovative office-cycling concept to prevent and reduce musculoskeletal pain in sedentary office workers.

  • 38.
    Björn, Catrine
    et al.
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Centre for Research & Development, Uppsala University/County Council of Gävleborg, Gävle, Sweden.
    Josephson, Malin
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Wadensten, Barbro
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Rissén, Dag
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research. Centre for Research & Development, Uppsala University/County Council of Gävleborg, Gävle, Sweden.
    Prominent attractive qualities of nurses’ work in operating room departments: a questionnaire study2015In: Work: A journal of Prevention, Assesment and rehabilitation, ISSN 1051-9815, E-ISSN 1875-9270, Vol. 52, no 4, 877-889 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The shortage of nurses in operating room departments (ORs) in Sweden and other countries can lead to reduced capacity and quality in healthcare, as well as more intense work for those on the job. Little is known about what nurses in ORs perceive as crucial for their workplace to be attractive.

    OBJECTIVE: To capture attractive qualities of nurses work in ORs and to adapt the Attractive Work Questionnaire (AWQ).

    METHODS: The AWQ, rating attractive qualities of work, were completed by 147 (68%) nurses in four Swedish ORs. Principal Component Analyses were performed to determine the underlying structure of the data.

    RESULTS: The factors in the area Work conditions were: relations, leadership, equipment, salary, organisation, physical work environment, location, and working hours; in the area Work content: mental work, autonomy and work rate; and in the area Job satisfaction: status and acknowledgement. The Principal Component Analysis showed consistency with the original AWQ. Cronbach’s alpha varied between 0.57-0.90.

    CONCLUSIONS: The AWQ captured attractive qualities for nurses in ORs, some less discussed regarding nurse retention, i.e. equipment, physical work environment and location. The results suggest that the questionnaire is reliable and valid and can be a useful tool in identifying attractive work.

  • 39.
    Bombardi, C.
    et al.
    Department of Veterinary Morphophysiology and Animal Productions, University of Bologna, Ozzano dell'Emilia, Italy.
    Grandis, A.
    Department of Veterinary Morphophysiology and Animal Productions, University of Bologna, Ozzano dell'Emilia, Italy.
    Chiocchetti, R.
    Department of Veterinary Morphophysiology and Animal Productions, University of Bologna, Ozzano dell'Emilia, Italy.
    Bortolami, R.
    Department of Veterinary Morphophysiology and Animal Productions, University of Bologna, Ozzano dell'Emilia, Italy.
    Johansson, Håkan
    University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Lucchi, M. L.
    Department of Veterinary Morphophysiology and Animal Productions, University of Bologna, Ozzano dell'Emilia, Italy.
    Immunohistochemical localization of alpha(1a)-adrenoreceptors in muscle spindles of rabbit masseter muscle2006In: Tissue & Cell, ISSN 0040-8166, E-ISSN 1532-3072, Vol. 38, no 2, 121-125 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The expression of alpha(1a)-adrenoreceptors (alpha(1a)-ARs) within the muscle spindles of rabbit masseter muscle was investigated. The alpha(1a)-ARs were detected by immunohistochemical fluorescent method and examined along the entire length of 109 cross serially sectioned spindles. The sympathetic fibers were visualized by the immunofluorescent labeling of the noradrenaline synthesizing enzymes tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DBH). In order to recognize the intrafusal muscle fiber types, antibodies for different myosin heavy chain isoforms (MyHCI) were used. TH and DBH immunolabeled nerve fibers have been observed within the capsule lamellar layers, in the periaxial fluid space and close to intrafusal muscle fibers. The alpha(1a)-ARs were detected on the smooth muscle cells of the blood vessels coursing in the muscle and in the capsule lamellar layers or within the periaxial fluid space of the spindles. Moreover, at the polar regions of a high percentage (88.1%) of muscle spindles a strong alpha(1a)-ARs immunoreactivity was present on the intrafusal muscle fibers. In double immunostained sections for alpha(1a)-ARs and MyHCI it was evidenced that both bag, and nuclear chain fibers express alpha(1a)-ARs. The receptors that we have detected by immunofluorescence may support a direct control by adrenergic fibers on muscle spindle.

  • 40.
    Bond, Lisa
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences.
    Effekt av höj- och sänkbara skrivbord efter arbetstid: Påverkas fysisk aktivitet samt skattning av fysiska besvär efter arbetstid hos kontorsanställda som använt ett höj och sänkbart skrivbord2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Several studies show that sedentary is harmful to humans. Despite this, the degree of sedentary increases and 75% of the total time of sedentary is at the workplace. A common way to reduce sedentary is to introduce sit-stand workstations. Studies show that this gives good effects during working hours but few have studied what those providing for effects after working hours. Objective: Study office workers to see if there is a difference in the frequency and duration of physical activity and estimation of physical problems after a working day if they were sedentary or varied its working position by using a sit-stand workstation.

    Method: 20 office workers measured the frequency and duration of physical activity and estimated physical problems through a diary and a questionnaire after work.

    Results: No significant differences were detected.

    Conclusions: It is not possible to draw any general conclusions from this study as the sample is small and measurement methods are only subjective. More studies are needed where you look at what happens after working hours in the future to ensure the pros and cons of sit-stand worskstations.

  • 41.
    Bosch, Tim
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    De Looze, Michiel
    TNO Work & Employment.
    Hallman, David
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Lyskov, Eugene
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Visser, Bart
    Faculty of Human Movement Sciences, VU Amsterdam.
    van Dieën, Jaap
    Faculty of Human Movement Sciences, VU Amsterdam.
    Fatigue, timing strategy and performance during prolonged repetitive work with interposed breaks2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Bosch, Tim
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Hallman, David
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    De Looze, Michiel
    TNO, Work& Employment, the Netherlands.
    Lyskov, Eugene
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Visser, Bart
    Amsterdam School of Health Professions, the Netherlands.
    van Dieën, Jaap
    VU Amsterdam, Faculty of Human Movement Sciences, the Netherlands.
    Temporal strategy and performance during a fatiguing short-cycle repetitive task2012In: Ergonomics, ISSN 0014-0139, E-ISSN 1366-5847, Vol. 55, 863-873 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigated temporal changes in movement strategy and performance during fatiguing short-cycle work. Eighteen participants performed six 7-minutes work blocks with repetitive reaching movements at 0.5 Hz, each followed by a 5.5-minute rest break for a total duration of one hour. Electromyography (EMG) was collected continuously from the upper trapezius muscle, the temporal movement strategy and timing errors were obtained on a cycle-to-cycle basis, and perceived fatigue was rated before and after each work block. Clear signs of fatigue according to subjective ratings and EMG manifestations developed within each work block, as well as during the entire hour. For most participants, timing errors gradually increased, as did the waiting time at the near target. Changes in temporal movement strategy were negatively correlated with changes in the level and variability of EMG, suggesting that an adaptive temporal strategy offset the development of unstable motor solutions in this fatiguing, short-cycle work

  • 43.
    Burström, Lage
    et al.
    Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden; Department of Work and the Physical Environment, National Institute for Working Life, Umeå, Sweden.
    Lundström, Ronnie
    Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden; Department of Biomedical Engineering and Informatics, University Hospital of Northern Sweden, Umeå, Sweden.
    Sjödin, Fredrik
    Department of Work and the Physical Environment, National Institute for Working Life, Umeå, Sweden.
    Lindmark, Asta
    Department of Work and the Physical Environment, National Institute for Working Life, Umeå, Sweden.
    Lindkvist, Markus
    Department of Biomedical Engineering and Informatics, University Hospital of Northern Sweden, Umeå, Sweden.
    Hagberg, Mats
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Thor
    Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden; Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Sundsvall Hospital, Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Acute effects of vibration on thermal perception thresholds2008In: International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, ISSN 0340-0131, E-ISSN 1432-1246, Vol. 81, no 5, 603-611 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective This study focuses on the acute effects of vibration and how vibrations influence the measures of the thermal perception thresholds during different vibration magnitudes, frequencies, and durations.

    Methods The fingers of ten healthy subjects, five males and five females, were exposed to vibration under 16 conditions with a combination of different frequency, intensity and exposure time. The vibration frequency was 31.5 and 125 Hz and exposure lasted between 2 and 16 min. The energy-equivalent frequency weighted acceleration, according to ISO 5349-1, for the experimental time of 16 min was 2.5 or 5.0 m/s(2) (r.m.s.), corresponding to a 8-h equivalent acceleration, A(8) of 0.46 and 0.92 m/s(2), respectively. A measure of the thermal perception of cold and warmth was conducted before the different exposures to vibration. Immediately after the vibration exposure the acute effect was measured continuously on the exposed index finger for the first 75 s, followed by 30 s of measures at every minute for a maximum of 10 min. If the subject's thermal thresholds had not recovered, the measures continued for a maximum of 30 min with measurements taken every 5 min.

    Results For all experimental conditions and 30 s after exposure, the mean changes of the thresholds compared with the pre-test were found to be 0.05 and -0.67C for the warmth and cold thresholds, respectively. The effect of the vibration exposure was only significant on the cold threshold and only for the first minute after exposure when the threshold was decreased. The warmth threshold was not significantly affected at all. The frequency and the exposure time of the vibration stimuli had no significant influence on the perception thresholds for the sensation of cold or warmth. Increased equivalent frequency weighted acceleration resulted in a significant decrease of the subjects' cold threshold, not the warmth. The thresholds were unaffected when changes in the vibration magnitude were expressed as the frequency weighted acceleration or the unweighted acceleration.

    Conclusion When testing for the thermotactile thresholds, exposure to vibration on the day of a test might influence the results. Until further knowledge is obtained the previous praxis of 2 h avoidance of vibration exposure before assessment is recommended.

  • 44.
    Burström, Lage
    et al.
    Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden; Department of Work and the Physical Environment, National Institute for Working Life, Umeå, Sweden.
    Lundström, Ronnie
    Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden; Department of Biomedical Engineering and Informatics, University Hospital of Northern Sweden, Umeå, Sweden.
    Sjödin, Fredrik
    Department of Work and the Physical Environment, National Institute for Working Life, Umeå, Sweden.
    Lindmark, Asta
    Department of Work and the Physical Environment, National Institute for Working Life, Umeå, Sweden.
    Lindkvist, Markus
    Department of Biomedical Engineering and Informatics, University Hospital of Northern Sweden, Umeå, Sweden.
    Hagberg, Mats
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Thor
    Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden; Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Sundsvall Hospital, Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Acute effects of vibration on thermal perception thresholds2006In: Diagnosis of injuries caused by hand-transmitted vibration - 2nd International workshop, Göteborg, 2006, 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective This study focuses on the acute effects of vibration and how vibrations influence the measures of the thermal perception thresholds during different vibration magnitudes, frequencies, and durations.

    Methods The fingers of ten healthy subjects, five males and five females, were exposed to vibration under 16 conditions with a combination of different frequency, intensity and exposure time. The vibration frequency was 31.5 and 125 Hz and exposure lasted between 2 and 16 min. The energy-equivalent frequency weighted acceleration, according to ISO 5349-1, for the experimental time of 16 min was 2.5 or 5.0 m/s(2) (r.m.s.), corresponding to a 8-h equivalent acceleration, A(8) of 0.46 and 0.92 m/s(2), respectively. A measure of the thermal perception of cold and warmth was conducted before the different exposures to vibration. Immediately after the vibration exposure the acute effect was measured continuously on the exposed index finger for the first 75 s, followed by 30 s of measures at every minute for a maximum of 10 min. If the subject's thermal thresholds had not recovered, the measures continued for a maximum of 30 min with measurements taken every 5 min.

    Results For all experimental conditions and 30 s after exposure, the mean changes of the thresholds compared with the pre-test were found to be 0.05 and -0.67C for the warmth and cold thresholds, respectively. The effect of the vibration exposure was only significant on the cold threshold and only for the first minute after exposure when the threshold was decreased. The warmth threshold was not significantly affected at all. The frequency and the exposure time of the vibration stimuli had no significant influence on the perception thresholds for the sensation of cold or warmth. Increased equivalent frequency weighted acceleration resulted in a significant decrease of the subjects' cold threshold, not the warmth. The thresholds were unaffected when changes in the vibration magnitude were expressed as the frequency weighted acceleration or the unweighted acceleration.

    Conclusion When testing for the thermotactile thresholds, exposure to vibration on the day of a test might influence the results. Until further knowledge is obtained the previous praxis of 2 h avoidance of vibration exposure before assessment is recommended.

  • 45.
    Carlsson, Amelie
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences.
    Reproducerbarhet i öga-nacke/skuldra besvär hos yrkesverksamma mikroskoparbetare: Självskattade besvär inom och mellan måndagar och fredagar under två separata arbetsveckor2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Microscopy at work involves a combination of external exposures that pose an increased risk for eye-neck/shoulder symptoms such as; visually demanding near work, eye-hand coordination, static work postures and repetitive work.

    Objectives: To explore the pattern of fluctuations in eye-neck/shoulder symptoms and the reproducibility of these fluctuations during separate workdays and workweeks, for individuals who regularly perform microscopic duties at work.

    Method: Data was collected at 8 different times for all participants (n=16); Monday morning and afternoon and Friday morning and afternoon, during 2 different weeks at work.

    Results: Musculoskeletal complaints in the neck/shoulders and symptoms of eye strain increased significantly (∆Musculoskeletal complaints; p<0,01, ∆Symptoms of eye stain; p<0,05)  during the workweek.  The highest levels of self-reported symptoms did not correlate with the self-reported time in microscopy during the workweek (p>0.05).  The same tendency for the increments in symptoms was observed during both work weeks. Only for musculoskeletal complaints did the increments of symptoms correlated with one another (p<0.05). 

    Conclusion: The results indicate that microscopy at work is a risk factor, primarily for increased musculoskeletal complaints in the neck/shoulders. More studies are needed to assess the relationship between microscopy at work and the onset and development of eye-neck/shoulder complaints.

  • 46.
    Carlsson, Ruth
    et al.
    Swedish Work Environment Authority.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Physical variation at work – a scientific review2016In: NES2016 - Ergonomics in theory and practice: Proceedings of 48th Annual Conference of Nordic Ergonomics and Human Factors Society / [ed] Järvelin-Pasanen, S, 2016, 156-159 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Physical variation is generally considered to be an important factor influencing the risk for musculoskeletal disorders in repetitive work, but a comprehensive scientific basis for this assumption has not been available. Thus, the Swedish Work Environment Authority requested the Centre for Musculoskeletal Research at the University of Gävle to review scientific standings regarding physical variation and its effects.  In total, 56 articles were included in the review. The results showed that occupationally relevant studies of the effects of physical variation are few, and that the effectiveness of initiatives promoting variation has also been studied to a limited extent. Thus, current research cannot provide a clear answer to what an effective combination would be of work tasks in a job in the context of physical variation, let alone the optimal time distribution of tasks in a short (hours, days) and long (weeks, months, years) perspective. Also, gender aspects of physical variation were considered to a very limited extent. There is a need for more studies of relevant initiatives aiming at creating increased physical variation by changing the contents of work or its temporal structure; including studies placing this issue in a gender perspective.

  • 47.
    Carrwik, Christian
    et al.
    Department of Surgical Sciences, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Murakami, Hideki
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa, Japan.
    Willander, Johan
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Psychology.
    Robinson, Yohan
    Department of Surgical Sciences, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Potential harms of interventions for spinal metastatic disease2017In: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, ISSN 1469-493X, E-ISSN 1469-493X, no 7, CD012724Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This is a protocol for a Cochrane Review (Intervention). The objectives are as follows: The primary objective of this review is to compare the potential harms of treatment for spinal metastatic disease for the following treatments: 1. Surgical intervention. 2. Surgical intervention with radiation therapy. 3. Radiation therapy alone. Our secondary objectives are: 1. comparing the harms of different surgical methods; 2. comparing the harms between different radiation protocols.

  • 48.
    Ciccarelli, Marina
    et al.
    School of Occupational Therapy & Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Straker, Leon
    School of Physiotherapy and Exercise Science, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Pollock, Clare
    Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Posture variation among office workers when using different information and communication technologies at work and away from work2014In: Ergonomics, ISSN 0014-0139, E-ISSN 1366-5847, Vol. 57, no 11, 1678-1686 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Office workers perform tasks using different information and communication technologies (ICT) involving various postures. Adequate variation in postures and muscle activity is generally believed to protect against musculoskeletal complaints, but insufficient information exists regarding the effect on postural variation of using different ICT. Thus, this study among office workers aimed to determine and compare postures and postural variation associated with using distinct types of ICT. Upper arm, head and trunk postures of 24 office workers were measured with the Physiometer® over a whole day in their natural work and away-from-work environments. Postural variation was quantified using two indices; APDF(90-10) and EVA(sd).Various ICT had different postural means and variation. Paper-based tasks had more non-neutral, yet also more variable postures. Electronics-based tasks had more neutral postures, with less postural variability. Tasks simultaneously using paper- and electronics-based ICT had least neutral and least variable postures. Tasks without ICT usually had the most posture variability. Interspersing tasks involving different ICT could increase overall exposure variation among office workers and may thus contribute to musculoskeletal risk reduction.

  • 49.
    Ciccarelli, Marina
    et al.
    Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Straker, Leon
    Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Pollock, Clare
    Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Variation in Muscle Activity Among Office Workers When Using Different Information Technologies at Work and Away From Work2013In: Human Factors, ISSN 0018-7208, E-ISSN 1547-8181, Vol. 55, no 5, 911-923 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To determine differences in muscle activity amplitudes and variation of amplitudes, when using different Information and Communication Technologies (ICT).

    Background: Office workers use different ICT to perform tasks. Upper body musculoskeletal complaints are frequently reported by this occupational group. Increased muscle activity and insufficient muscle activity variation are potential risk factors for musculoskeletal complaints.

    Method: Muscle activity of right and left upper trapezius and right wrist extensor muscle bundle (extensor carpi radialis longus and brevis) of 24 office workers (performing their usual tasks requiring different ICT at work and away-from-work) were measured continuously over 10-12 hours. Muscle activity variation was quantified using two indices, APDF(90-10) and EVAsd.

    Results: There was a trend for electronics-based New ICT tasks to involve less electromyography (EMG) variation than paper-based Old ICT tasks. Performing Combined ICT tasks (i.e. using paper- and electronics-based ICT simultaneously) resulted in the highest muscle activity levels and least variation; however, these Combined ICT tasks were rarely performed. Tasks involving no ICT (Non-ICT) had the greatest muscle activity variation.

    Conclusion: Office workers in this study used various ICT during tasks at work and away-from-work. The high EMG amplitudes and low variation observed when using Combined ICT may present the greatest risk for musculoskeletal complaints, and use of Combined ICT by workers should be kept low in office work. Breaking up Combined, New and Old ICT tasks; for example, by interspersing highly variable Non-ICT tasks into office workers’ daily tasks, could increase overall muscle activity variation and reduce risk for musculoskeletal complaints.

  • 50.
    Clays, Els
    et al.
    Department of Public Health, Ghent University, Belgium.
    Hallman, David
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Oakman, J.
    Department of Public Health, La Trobe University, Australia.
    Holtermann, Andreas
    National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Objectively measured occupational physical activities in blue collar jobs: do psychosocial resources matter?2017In: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, 2017, Vol. 24(2S)Conference paper (Refereed)
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