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  • 1.
    Amein, Tahsein
    et al.
    Dept Cell & Mol Biol, Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Wright, Sandra A. I.
    Univ Studi Molise, Dipartimento Sci Anim Vegetali & Ambiente, Italy .
    Wikstroem, Mariann
    Jordbruksverket Växtskyddscentralen Alnarp, Sweden .
    Koch, Eckhard
    JKI, Inst Biol Control, Darmstadt, Germany .
    Schmitt, Annegret
    JKI, Inst Biol Control, Darmstadt, Germany .
    Stephan, Dietrich
    JKI, Inst Biol Control, Darmstadt, Germany .
    Jahn, Marga
    JKI, Inst Strategies & Technol Assessment Plant Protec, Kleinmachnow, Germany .
    Tinivella, Federico
    Univ Turin, Italy .
    Gullino, M. Lodovica
    Univ Turin, Italy .
    Forsberg, Gustaf
    Seedgard AB, Uppsala, Sweden .
    Werner, Sigrid
    Hild Samen GmbH, Marbach Am Neckar, Germany.
    van der Wolf, Jan
    Plant Res Int, Netherlands.
    Groot, Steven Pc
    Plant Res Int, Netherlands.
    Evaluation of non-chemical seed treatment methods for control of Alternaria brassicicola on cabbage seeds2011In: Journal of Plant Diseases and Protection, ISSN 1861-3829, E-ISSN 1861-3837, Vol. 118, no 6, p. 214-221Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Due to the lack of foliar fungicide use, the organic production of Brassica seeds free of Alternaria spp. is difficult. Therefore, effective seed treatments certified for use in organic farming are needed to eradicate or at least effectively reduce the seed-borne inoculum. We here report results of greenhouse and field experiments in which non-chemical seed treatments were tested for control of A. brassicicola on cabbage seeds naturally infested with the pathogen. In greenhouse experiments, significant improvements were obtained by seed treatment with some commercialised and experimental microbial biocontrol agents, an emulsion of thyme oil in water (0.1%) and by the tested physical seed treatments methods (i.e. hot water, aerated steam and electron seed treatment). Resistance inducers tended to increase the percentage of healthy plants, but the effects were statistically not significant. Generally the combination of physical treatments with the effective agents did not result in improved performance. Positive effects on crop establishment and yield by the same treatments were also observed in field tests. Overall the results indicate that several options for non-chemical control of A. brassicicola on Brassica seeds exist that are comparable in efficacy to the chemical standard Aatiram (active ingredient thiram) used in this study.

  • 2.
    Amiri, Shahnaz
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Energy engineering. Department of Management and Engineering, Division of Energy Systems, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Henning, Dag
    Optensys Energianalys, Linköping, Sweden .
    Karlsson, Björn G.
    Department of Management and Engineering, Division of Energy Systems, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden .
    Simulation and introduction of a CHP plant in a Swedish biogas system2013In: Renewable energy, ISSN 0960-1481, E-ISSN 1879-0682, Vol. 49, p. 242-249Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objectives of this study are to present a model for biogas production systems to help achieve a more cost-effective system, and to analyse the conditions for connecting combined heat and power (CHP) plants to the biogas system. The European electricity market is assumed to be fully deregulated. The relation between connection of CHP. increased electricity and heat production, electricity prices, and electricity certificate trading is investigated. A cost-minimising linear programming model (MODEST) is used. MODEST has been applied to many energy systems, but this is the first time the model has been used for biogas production. The new model, which is the main result of this work, can be used for operational optimisation and evaluating economic consequences of future changes in the biogas system. The results from the case study and sensitivity analysis show that the model is reliable and can be used for strategic planning. The results show that implementation of a biogas-based CHP plant result in an electricity power production of approximately 39 GW h annually. Reduced system costs provide a profitability of 46 MSEK/year if electricity and heat prices increase by 100% and electricity certificate prices increase by 50%. CO2 emission reductions up to 32,000 ton/year can be achieved if generated electricity displaces coal-fired condensing power.

  • 3.
    Andersson, Erik
    et al.
    Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Barthel, Stephan
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Environmental engineering. Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Memory carriers and stewardship of metropolitan landscapes2016In: Ecological Indicators, ISSN 1470-160X, E-ISSN 1872-7034, Vol. 70, p. 606-614Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    History matters, and can be an active and dynamic component in the present. We explore social-ecological memory as way to diagnose and engage with urban green space performance and resilience. Rapidly changing cities pose a threat and a challenge to the continuity that has helped to support biodiversity and ecological functions by upholding similar or only slowly changing adaptive cycles over time. Continuity is perpetuated through memory carriers, slowly changing variables and features that retain or make available information on how different situations have been dealt with before. Ecological memory carriers comprise memory banks, spatial connections and mobile link species. These can be supported by social memory carriers, represented by collectively created social features like habits, oral tradition, rules-in-use and artifacts, as well as media and external sources. Loss or lack of memory can be diagnoses by the absence or disconnect between memory carriers, as will be illustrated by several typical situations. Drawing on a set of example situations, we present an outline for a look-up table approach that connects ecological memory carriers to the social memory carriers that support them and use these connections to set diagnoses and indicate potential remedies. The inclusion of memory carriers in planning and management considerations may facilitate preservation of feedbacks and disturbance regimes as well as species and habitats, and the cultural values and meanings that go with them.

  • 4.
    Andersson, Erik
    et al.
    Department of Systems Ecology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Barthel, Stephan
    Department of Systems Ecology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ahrné, K.
    Department of Entomology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Measuring social – ecological dynamics behind the generation of ecosystem services2007In: Ecological Applications, ISSN 1051-0761, E-ISSN 1939-5582, Vol. 17, no 5, p. 1267-1278Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The generation of ecosystem services depends on both social and ecological features. Here we focus on management, its ecological consequences, and social drivers. Our approach combined (1) quantitative surveys of local species diversity and abundance of three functional groups of ecosystem service providers (pollinators, seed dispersers, and insectivores) with (2) qualitative studies of local management practices connected to these services and their underlying social mechanisms, i.e., institutions, local ecological knowledge, and a sense of place. It focused on the ecology of three types of green areas (allotment gardens, cemeteries, and city parks) in the city of Stockholm, Sweden. These are superficially similar but differ considerably in their management. Effects of the different practices could be seen in the three functional groups, primarily as a higher abundance of pollinators in the informally managed allotment gardens and as differences in the composition of seed dispersers and insectivores. Thus, informal management, which is normally disregarded by planning authorities, is important for ecosystem services in the urban landscape. Furthermore, we suggest that informal management has an important secondary function: It may be crucial during periods of instability and change as it is argued to promote qualities with potential for adaptation. Allotment gardeners seem to be the most motivated managers, something that is reflected in their deeper knowledge and can be explained by a sense of place and management institutions. We propose that co-management would be one possible way to infuse the same positive qualities into all management and that improved information exchange between managers would be one further step toward ecologically functional urban landscapes.

  • 5.
    Andersson, Erik
    et al.
    Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Barthel, Stephan
    Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Borgström, S.
    Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Colding, Johan
    The Beijer Institute, Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Elmqvist, Tomas
    Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden; The Beijer Institute, Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gren, A.
    The Beijer Institute, Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Reconnecting cities to the biosphere: Stewardship of green infrastructure and urban ecosystem services2016In: Sustainable Cities: Urban Planning Challenges and Policy, CRC Press , 2016, p. 29-45Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 6.
    arvidsson, emma
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electronics, Mathematics and Natural Sciences.
    Bakom Ladan: En skiss eller två på en hälsoträdgård på Wij Trädgårdar2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract

    The research in the interdisciplinary field of natural-human-health-design has in recent decades gainedmomentum and led to new or new-old ways of thinking and acting in terms of planning and design of outdoorenvironments with the aim of health promotion. Concrete concept models and design guides have begun toemerge as a result of this research.The purpose of this work is to use these guides to develop a design proposal for a supposed health garden,with Wij Trädgårdar in Ockelbo as a base. This has been done in the form of a process description. The targetgroup for the design proposal is long-term unemployed and people who have come to Sweden as refugees.Since the specific design recommendations could not be found for the selected target group, the main materialwas general guidelines for health gardens in combination with guidelines for health gardens directed to targetgroups with stress-related problems, which is a broad target group for which there are relatively much currentresearch.The result is a process description of the progression towards a sketch on a health garden, designed for aspecific spot on Wij Trädgårdar, but available for use in other locations, provided adjustments is made to thespecific location. The sketch is supplemented with plant suggestions to different parts of the garden. A sketchof an alternative proposal is included as a smaller, faster and cheaper version of the main design proposal.

  • 7.
    Askvärn, Elisabeth
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electronics, Mathematics and Natural Sciences.
    Kan växter lindra klimakteriebesvär?: Behandling av vasomotoriska symptom med hjälp av örtmedicin2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate the use of herbal medicine for vasomotor symptoms during menopause. The questions posed were which herbs that were used, what parts of the herbs that were used, and how the plant parts were prepared and utilized. The last question covered how much the plants alleviated the vasomotor symptoms.

    A review of the scientific literature was carried out. In the articles, 20 herbs and plants were used, but only five of them were said to relieve the vasomotor symptoms. The five plants were Actaea racemosa, Angelica sinensis, Ginkgo biloba, Glycine sp. and Pimpinella anisum.  The most commonly used parts of the herbs were the roots, often through extracts that were processed in order to increase the concentration and to transform the plant parts into powder. The powder was then for the most part transformed to tablets and capsules. Sometimes, information was missing, such as the scientific names of the plants, what parts of the plants that were used and how the herbs were prepared and utilized.

    On average, the herbs alleviated the vasomotor symptoms by 60 %. Most of the herbs appeared to relieve mild symptoms more than they alleviated strong symptoms. An exception was P. anisum, which decreased both the amount of and the strength of the flushes by 74 %.

    This literature study shows that there are plants that influence the vasomotor symptoms in a positive direction. At the same time, it shows that the information in the articles is sometimes incomplete and that the scientists do not always study if the herbs can give side effects.

    Herbal medicine could be an alternative for women who, for different reasons, cannot or do not want to take synthetic hormones or other pharmacological medicines. However, in order to make herbal medicine part of the treatment offered by public health care, longitudinal studies that also investigate possible side effects or risks are needed for securing the effect of the herbs on the human body.

  • 8.
    Barthel, Stephan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Colding, Johan
    Beijer International Institute of Ecological Economics, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Elmqvist, Tomas
    Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    History and local management of a biodiversity-rich, urban cultural landscape2005In: Ecology & society, ISSN 1708-3087, E-ISSN 1708-3087, Vol. 10, no 2, article id 10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Urban green spaces provide socially valuable ecosystem services. Through an historical analysis of the development of the National Urban Park (NUP) of Stockholm, we illustrate how the coevolutionary process of humans and nature has resulted in the high level of biological diversity and associated recreational services found in the park. The ecological values of the area are generated in the cultural landscape. External pressures resulting in urban sprawl in the Stockholm metropolitan region increasingly challenge the capacity of the NUP to continue to generate valuable ecosystem services. Setting aside protected areas, without accounting for the role of human stewardship of the cultural landscape, will most likely fail. In a social inventory of the area, we identify 69 local user and interest groups currently involved in the NUP area. Of these, 25 are local stewardship associations that have a direct role in managing habitats within the park that sustain such services as recreational landscapes, seed dispersal, and pollination. We propose that incentives should be created to widen the current biodiversity management paradigm, and actively engage local stewardship associations in adaptive co-management processes of the park and surrounding green spaces. Copyright © 2005 by the author(s). Published here under license by the Resilience Alliance.

  • 9.
    Barthel, Stephan
    et al.
    Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Sweden; Department of History, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Crumley, Carole L.
    Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Sweden; Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Swedish Biodiversity Centre, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Uppsala, Sweden.
    Svedin, Uno
    Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Biocultural Refugia: Combating the Erosion of Diversity in Landscapes of Food Production2013In: Ecology & society, ISSN 1708-3087, E-ISSN 1708-3087, Vol. 18, no 4, article id 71Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is urgent need to both reduce the rate of biodiversity loss caused by industrialized agriculture and feed more people. The aim of this paper is to highlight the role of places that harbor traditional ecological knowledge, artifacts, and methods when preserving biodiversity and ecosystem services in landscapes of food production. We use three examples in Europe of biocultural refugia, defined as the physical places that not only shelter farm biodiversity, but also carry knowledge and experiences about practical management of how to produce food while stewarding biodiversity and ecosystem services. Memory carriers include genotypes, landscape features, oral, and artistic traditions and self-organized systems of rules, and as such reflect a diverse portfolio of practices on how to deal with unpredictable change. We find that the rich biodiversity of many regionally distinct cultural landscapes has been maintained through different smallholder practices developed in relation to local environmental fluctuations and carried within biocultural refugia for as long as millennia. Places that transmit traditional ecological knowledge and practices hold important lessons for policy makers since they may provide genetic and cultural reservoirs - refugia - for the wide array of species that have co-evolved with humans in Europe for more than 6000 thousand yrs. Biodiversity restoration projects in domesticated landscapes can employ the biophysical elements and cultural practices embedded in biocultural refugia to create locally adapted small-scale mosaics of habitats that allow species to flourish and adapt to change. We conclude that such insights must be included in discussions of land-sparing vs. land-sharing when producing more food while combating loss of biodiversity. We found the latter strategy rational in domesticated landscapes with a long history of agriculture.

  • 10.
    Barthel, Stephan
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building Engineering, Energy Systems and Sustainability Science, Environmental Science. Stockholm University.
    Isendahl, Christian
    Göteborgs Universitet.
    Vis, Ben
    University of Kent, UK.
    Drescher, Axel
    University of Erlangen-Nuernberg, Germany.
    Evans, Dan
    Lancaster University, UK.
    van Timmeren, Arjan
    TU Delft, The Netherlands.
    Global urbanization and food production in direct competition for land: Leverage places to mitigate impacts on SDG2 and on the Earth System2019In: The Anthropocene Review, ISSN 2053-0196, Vol. 6, no 1-2, p. 71-97Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Global urbanization and food production are in direct competition for land. This paper carries outa critical review of how displacing crop production from urban and peri-urban land to other areas– because of issues related to soil quality – will demand a substantially larger proportion of theEarth’s terrestrial land surface than the surface area lost to urban encroachment. Such relationshipsmay trigger further distancing effects and unfair social-ecological teleconnections. It risks also settingin motion amplifying effects within the Earth System. In combination, such multiple stressors set thescene for food riots in cities of the Global South. Our review identifies viable leverage points on whichto act in order to navigate urban expansion away from fertile croplands. We first elaborate on thepolitical complexities in declaring urban and peri-urban lands with fertile soils as one global commons.We find that the combination of an advisory global policy aligned with regional policies enablingrobust common properties rights for bottom-up actors and movements in urban and peri-urbanagriculture (UPA) as multi-level leverage places to intervene. To substantiate the ability of aligningglobal advisory policy with regional planning, we review both past and contemporary examples whereempowering local social-ecological UPA practices and circular economies have had a stimulatingeffect on urban resilience and helped preserve, restore, and maintain urban lands with healthy soils.

  • 11.
    Berg, Björn
    et al.
    Dipartimento biologia strutturale e funzionale, Complesso universitario di Monte S. Angelo, Napoli, Italy; Department of forest ecology, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Davey, M. P.
    Department of plant sciences, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom.
    De Marco, A.
    Dipartimento biologia strutturale e funzionale, Complesso universitario di Monte S. Angelo, Napoli, Italy.
    Emmett, B
    Centre for ecology and hydrology, Bangor.
    Faituri, M.
    Department of soils and water, Omar AlMukhtar university, Elbeida, Libyan Arab Jamahiriya.
    Hobbie, S. E.
    Department of ecology, evolution and behavior, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, USA.
    Johansson, Maj-Britt
    University of Gävle.
    Liu, C.
    Department of landscape science and engineering, College of agriculture and biology, Shanghai, ChinaShanghai Jiao Tong university,.
    McClaugherty, C.
    Department of biology, Mount Union college, Alliance, USA.
    Norell, L.
    Unit of applied statistics and mathematics, SLU, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Rutigliano, F. A.
    Dipartimento di scienze ambientali, Seconda Università degli studi di Napoli, Caserta, Italy.
    Vesterdal, L.
    Forest & landscape Denmark, University of Copenhagen, Hørsholm, Denmark.
    Virzo De Santo, A.
    Dipartimento biologia strutturale e funzionale, Complesso universitario de Monte S. Angelo, Napoli, Italy.
    Factors influencing limit values for pine needle litter decomposition: A synthesis for boreal and temperate pine forest systems2010In: Biogeochemistry, ISSN 0168-2563, E-ISSN 1573-515X, Vol. 100, no 1, p. 57-73Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We synthesized available data for decomposition of pine (Pinus) needle litter in pine forests to determine the litter chemical characteristics and climate factors that explained variation in the limit value, i. e. the level of accumulated mass loss at which the decomposition process either continues at a very low rate or possibly stops. Our data base included 56 separate studies on decomposition of pine needle litter, spanning Scots pine, lodgepole pine, Aleppo pine, stone pine and white pine, mainly incubated at the site of collection. Studies had 5 to 19 samplings, on average 10, and the decomposition was followed to a mass loss ranging from 47 to 83%, on average 67%. The periods from 3.0 to 5.4 years, on average 3.9 years, were of sufficient duration to allow estimates of limit values of decomposition. We used a linear mixed model with regression effects to relate limit values to potential explanatory variables, namely the sites' long-term mean annual temperature (MAT) and mean annual precipitation (MAP) and to substrate-chemistry factors. Regarding the latter, we explored two models; one that included initial concentrations of water solubles, lignin, N, P, K, Ca, Mg, and Mn and one that included only lignin, N, Ca, and Mn to focus on those nutrients known to influence lignin degradation. Using backward elimination significant explanatory variables were determined. For litter decomposed in its site of origin we found the limit value to depend mainly on the initial concentration of Mn, with higher Mn concentrations resulting in higher accumulated mass loss. Thus, litter with higher Mn reached a higher limit value and left a smaller stable fraction. This is likely due to the fact that Mn is an essential component of ligninolytic enzymes important for degrading litter in the later stages of decomposition. Manganese has received little attention in decomposition studies to date. Given its significance in this synthesis, the role of Mn in influencing variation in the late stages of decomposition among ecosystems and among litters of other genera besides Pinus deserves further attention.

  • 12.
    Berg, Björn
    et al.
    Department of Forest Sciences, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland .
    Erhagen, Björn
    Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences, University of Umeå, Umeå, Sweden .
    Johansson, Maj-Britt
    University of Gävle.
    Nilsson, Mats
    Department of Forest Ecology and Management, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå.
    Stendahl, Johan
    Department of Soil and Environment, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala.
    Trum, Florence
    Earth and Life Institute, Universite' catolique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium .
    Vesterdal, Lars
    Department of Geosciences and Natural Resource Management, University of Copenhagen, Fredriksberg C, Denmark .
    Manganese in the litter fall-forest floor continuum of boreal and temperate pine and spruce forest ecosystems: a review2015In: Forest Ecology and Management, ISSN 0378-1127, E-ISSN 1872-7042, Vol. 358, p. 248-260, article id 15021Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have reviewed the literature on the role of manganese (Mn) in the litter fall-to-humus subsystem. Available data gives a focus on North European coniferous forests. Manganese concentrations in pine (Pinus spp.) foliar litter are highly variable both spatially and temporally within the same litter species and for the genus Pinus we found a range from 0.03 to 3.7mgg-1. Concentrations were related negatively to site mean annual temperature (MAT) and annual actual evapotranspiration (AET) for pine species litter but not for that of Norway spruce (Picea abies) as a single species. Combined data for several species showed a highly significant relationship to MAT.Manganese peroxidase is an Mn-dependent enzyme, found in white-rot fungi, essential for the degradation of lignin and ligninlike compounds. The decomposition rates of lignified litter tissue (late phase) is positively related to the litter’s Mn concentration. Further, the Mn concentration is positively related to the limit value for decomposition - the higher the Mn concentration the smaller the stable litter fraction. Manganese release from decomposing litter appears at least in part to be species related. Thus was release from pine needle litter significantly faster (p<. 0.001) than that from the Mn-richer litter of Norway spruce. Over Northern Europe concentrations of total Mn in mor humus as well as extractable Mn in the mineral soil increase with decreasing MAT and over a climatic gradient the Mn concentrations in Norway spruce mor increase more with decreasing MAT than in a gradient with Scots pine. Higher Mn concentrations in humus appear to decrease its stability and result in a higher release of carbon dioxide (CO<inf>2</inf>) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). We conclude that this may explain (i) the lower amount of carbon (C) in mor layers under Norway spruce as compared to Scots pine as well as the higher amount of C in mineral soil under spruce. The increase in nitrogen (N) concentration in humus, following N fertilization resulted in a decrease in that of Mn. We have found four cases - empirical - with negative interaction between Mn and N; (i) in pine foliar litter fall concentrations of Mn decrease with site MAT whereas those of N increase, (ii) in decomposing late-stage litter with N retarding and Mn stimulating decomposition, (iii) for the stable phase, limit values are related negatively to N and positively to Mn, and (iv) Mn concentrations in humus decrease with MAT whereas those of N increase.

  • 13.
    Berg, Björn
    et al.
    Department of Forest Ecology, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Johansson, Maj-Britt
    University of Gävle.
    Liu, Chunjiang
    School of Agriculture and Biology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China; Shanghai Urban Forest Research Station, State Forestry Administration, Shanghai, China.
    Faituri, Mikaeel
    Department of Soils and Water, Omar AlMukhtar University, Elbeida, Libya.
    Sanborn, Paul
    Ecosystem Science and Management Program, University of Northern British Columbia, Prince George, Canada.
    Vesterdal, Lars
    Department of Geosciences and Natural Resource Management, University of Copenhagen, Frederiksberg, Denmark.
    Ni, Xiangyin
    Long-term Research Station of Alpine Forest Ecosystems, Key Laboratory of Ecological Forestry Engineering, Institute of Ecology and Forestry, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu, China.
    Hansen, Karin
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ukonmaanaho, Liisa
    Natural Resources Institute Finland, Helsinki, Finland.
    Calcium in decomposing foliar litter – A synthesis for boreal and temperate coniferous forests2017In: Forest Ecology and Management, ISSN 0378-1127, E-ISSN 1872-7042, Vol. 403, p. 137-144Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have synthesized available data for calcium (Ca) dynamics in decomposing foliar litter of mainly pine (Pinus), spruce (Picea), and birch (Betula) species to determine patterns of Ca concentration with climate in newly shed litter and its dynamics in decomposing litter as well as a possible role for Ca as regards limit values. Initial Ca concentration was negatively related to mean annual precipitation (MAP) with different relationships among genera. A limited data set showed a positive relationship across species (p &lt; 0.05) to extractable Ca in soil. In paired stands, litter of both Norway spruce (Picea abies) and lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) had higher Ca concentrations than Scots pine (Pinus silvestris), Norway spruce litter even twice as high. Relationships between initial concentrations of Ca and those of other nutrients appeared to be dominated by the positive ones to potassium (K) and magnesium (Mg) and specifically for deciduous litter there was a negative relationship to nitrogen (N). In decomposing litter, Ca concentration followed a negative quadratic (Ca = a + t − t2) function and had a maximum, which was variable. The Ca maximum concentration during decomposition was positively related to initial Ca concentration both within and among species. Separate linear relationships based on species were combined into one, in common for all investigated species and genera (R2 = 0.914, n = 63, p &lt; 0.001). Limit values for decomposition were positively related to maximum Ca concentration at p &lt; 0.05 with separate functions for pine and spruce litter. Calcium net release started directly after the incubation and was linear to accumulated mass loss of litter, giving a slope coefficient for each study. The net release rates were linear to initial Ca concentration both within and across species/genera. All studies combined gave a negative linear relationship (R2 = 0.894, n = 67, p &lt; 0.001).

  • 14.
    Berg, Björn
    et al.
    Department of Forest Ecology, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finlan; Dipartimento Biologia Strutturale e Funzionale, Complesso Universitario, Napoli, Italy.
    Johansson, Maj-Britt
    University of Gävle.
    Nilsson, Åke
    Department of Forest Soils, Swedish University of Agriculture, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Gundersen, Per
    Forest and Landscape Denmark, University of Copenhagen, HØrsholm, Denmark.
    Norell, Lennart
    Unit of Applied Statistics and Mathematics, Swedish University of Agrictulture, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Sequestration of carbon in the humus layer of Swedish forests - direct measurements2009In: Canadian Journal of Forest Research, ISSN 0045-5067, E-ISSN 1208-6037, Vol. 39, no 5, p. 962-975Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To determine sequestration rates of carbon dioxide (CO2) we calculated the carbon (C) storage rate in humus layers of Swedish forests with Podsolic soils, which account for 14.2 x 106 ha of the 22.7 x 106 ha of forested land in Sweden. Our data set covered 41 years of humus inventories and mean humus layer thickness in 82513 plots. We analysed three forest types: (i) all combinations of tree species, (ii) forests dominated (>70%) by Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.), and (Ui) forests dominated (>70%) by Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.). To relate changes in humus layer thickness to land area we used the intersections in 25 km x 25 km grids and used kriging interpolation, permitting calculations for each forest type. For each intersection mean humus thickness for each year was calculated and regressed against time to obtain the rate of change. This rate, humus bulk density, and humus C concentration were used, to calculate sequestration rates. The mean sequestration rate was 251 kg C-ha-1'year1, which is higher than theoretical values. The sequestration rate was positively related to temperature sum, albeit including effects of forest management. The pine-dominated forest type had a mean rate of 283 kgCha⁁year-1, and. the spruce-dominated had a mean rate of 239 kg Cha-1-year1. Under similar site conditions, pine sequestered more C than spruce (difference of 71 kg Cha-1'year-1; p < 0.0001), showing the importance of this type of ecosystem for C sequestration.

  • 15.
    Berg, Björn
    et al.
    Department of Forest Sciences, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Kjønaas, O. J.
    Norwegian Institute of Bioeconomy Research, Ås, Norway.
    Johansson, Maj-Britt
    University of Gävle.
    Erhagen, B.
    Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Åkerblom, S.
    Department of Aquatic Sciences and Assessment, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden .
    Late stage pine litter decomposition: Relationship to litter N, Mn, and acid unhydrolyzable residue (AUR) concentrations and climatic factors2015In: Forest Ecology and Management, ISSN 0378-1127, E-ISSN 1872-7042, Vol. 358, p. 41-47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to evaluate relationships between decomposition rates of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) and lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta var. contorta) needle litter in the late stage of decomposition (>30% accumulated mass loss), and the progressively changing concentrations of manganese (Mn), nitrogen (N), and acid unhydrolyzable residue (AUR), as well as mean annual temperature (MAT) and mean annual precipitation (MAP). Using available long-term decomposition studies on pine needle litter in a climate gradient in Sweden, we calculated annual mass loss and related to concentrations of Mn, N, and AUR at the start of each one-year period as well as to MAT and MAP. We investigated these relationships for (i) all data on annual mass loss combined and (ii) annual mass loss for five different decomposition categories as defined by accumulated mass loss. We found highly significant, negative, and dominant relationships between annual mass loss and N (R2=0.39) and AUR (R2=0.39), a slight but significant positive relationship to Mn (R2=0.08) and a significant negative relationship to MAT (R2=0.06). The relationships were dynamic, and changed with accumulated mass loss. The rate-dampening effect of N decreased to be a rate-enhancing effect at c. 60-80% accumulated mass loss. A similar trend was found for AUR, becoming rate-enhancing at 70-80% accumulated mass loss. For Scots pine needle litter the effect of MAT on mass loss decreased with increasing accumulated mass loss and changed to a rate-dampening effect at c. 50-70% accumulated mass loss. Mn showed a stimulating effect on mass loss rate in all categories whereas MAP showed no effect in this mainly boreal climatic gradient. The current approach indicates a method for detailed studies of rate-regulating factors for litter decomposition. 

  • 16.
    Bergquist, Arne
    et al.
    Lantmäteriet.
    Brandt, S. Anders
    University of Gävle, Department of Technology and Built Environment, Ämnesavdelningen för samhällsbyggnad.
    Klang, Dan
    Vad är optimal kvalitet på geografisk information som underlag för detaljerad översvämningskartering?2008In: Kart & Bildteknik (Mapping and Image Science), ISSN 1651-792X, no 4, p. 18-20Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 17.
    Berkes, F.
    et al.
    Natural Resources Institute, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada.
    Colding, Johan
    Natural Resources Management, Department of Systems Ecology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden; Beijer International Institute of Ecological Economics, Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Folke, Carl
    Natural Resources Management, Department of Systems Ecology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden; Beijer International Institute of Ecological Economics, Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rediscovery of Traditional Ecological Knowledge as adaptive management2000In: Ecological Applications, ISSN 1051-0761, E-ISSN 1939-5582, Vol. 10, no 5, p. 1251-1262Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Indigenous groups offer alternative knowledge and perspectives based on their own locally developed practices of resource use. We surveyed the international literature to focus on the role of Traditional Ecological Knowledge in monitoring, responding to, and managing ecosystem processes and functions, with special attention to ecological resilience. Case studies revealed that there exists a diversity of local or traditional practices for ecosystem management. These include multiple species management, resource rotation, succession management, landscape patchiness management, and other ways of responding to and managing pulses and ecological surprises. Social mechanisms behind these traditional practices include a number of adaptations for the generation, accumulation, and transmission of knowledge; the use of local institutions to provide leaders/stewards and rules for social regulation; mechanisms for cultural internalization of traditional practices; and the development of appropriate world views and cultural values. Some traditional knowledge and management systems were characterized by the use of local ecological knowledge to interpret and respond to feedbacks from the environment to guide the direction of resource management. These traditional systems had certain similarities to adaptive management with its emphasis on feedback learning, and its treatment of uncertainty and unpredictability intrinsic to all ecosystems.

  • 18.
    Bjerkendahl, Christel
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electronics, Mathematics and Natural Sciences.
    Tångodlad potatis- nyttigt eller skadligt?2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The nutrition bound in macroalgae, also known as seaweed, contains high amounts of all the nutrients, micronutrients, vitamins and plant hormones, necessary for plants, animals and humans. Totally for free it is floating in the oceans around the world and has been harvested and used by people for thousands of years. A problem that has arisen in the wake of Industrialism during the past 200 years is that human beings spread non-desirable substancesto air, water and soil, for example heavy metals. Macroalgae accumulate the heavy metals, which may become a problem if we want to eat seaweed or use it to grow plants in.  In a growth trial using macroalgal compost made from Fucus radicans collected from the Baltic Sea, the uptake heavy metals in the edible tubers of potatoes of the cultivar ‘Cherie’ was investigated. The following heavy metals were analyzed: lead(Pb), cadmium (Cd), mercury (Hg), arsenic (As) and copper (Cu). There were no differences in the uptake of heavy metal between potatoes grown in macroalgal compost and soil, but the potato tubers from both cultivations contained concentrations of Cd and As higher than those normally found in Swedish potatoes. The concentrations are, however, much lower than the limits set by EFSA. The macroalgal compost and the soil used in the experiment were also analyzed for heavy metal content. The Cd concentration in the compost exceeded the limit for Swedish compost. However, the high levels of Cd in the compost were not reflected in the Cd content of the potato tubers. Soil conductivity and pH values were also investigated. The high conductivityof the macroalgal compost was probably due to insufficient rinsing of the macroalgae, and thus it was not ideal for use in crop cultivation. In spite of this, the crop yield was good. In conclusion, macroalgal compost can be recommended as a cultivation substrate for potatoes.

  • 19.
    Boman, Malin
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electronics, Mathematics and Natural Sciences.
    Biokol i stadsträdens växtbäddar: med fokus på Stockholm stad2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The ground is an important factor to consider in today's tough climate for our urban trees. Especially for the trees that shall live in the most vulnerable parts of the city, such as the square, along heavily trafficked roads or surrounded by only paved surfaces. One solution is structured soils which is used in many cities in Sweden but also in other countries. An interesting new development of structured soils where AMA-soil has been replaced with biochar is now being tested in a project in Stockholm. The focus in this paper will therefore be on how biochar is used practically in the tree plant beds and the effects this has on the trees' development.

     

    The purpose of this paper is to get an insight on how biochar in urban tree plant beds are used with examples from Stockholm Biochar Project. And also to examine the parameters used to measure the effect biochar have on tree growth, and to assess the impact of biochar has on the trees.

     

    The work of this paper was carried out as an interview study and was then also combined with research in scientific books and articles. The interviewee is active in the area and works as a tree specialist at the traffic office,Stockholm city and complicit in Stockholm Biochar Project. Researched have been done in various databases where the keywords biokol, biochar, terra preta, urban city trees and tree inventory have been used.

     

    The construction of the plant bed with biochar in Stockholm city has proved to be similar to the old model, but it differs in that the AMA-soil has been exchanged for biochar and also in that the dimensions of the macadam instructured soil is changed.

     

    The parameters used in the Stockholm city to measure tree growth are stem circumference. But there are also other parameters that could be used to measure growth and these could also be applied to assess effect of the biochar on the tree.

     

    In a comparison of tree growth, where tree of the same species had grown in similar conditions but in three different types of plant beds, the results showed that the trees planted in biochar did not have the best growth.

  • 20.
    Brandt, S. Anders
    University of Gävle, Department of Technology and Built Environment, Ämnesavdelningen för samhällsbyggnad.
    Betydelse av höjdmodellers kvalitet vid översvämningsmodellering2009In: ULI aktuellt, ISSN 1654-6016, no 1, p. 8-9Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 21.
    Brandt, S. Anders
    University of Gävle, Department of Technology and Built Environment, Ämnesavdelningen för samhällsbyggnad.
    Föreläsningar - övningar - eller?: en jämförande studie av undervisningsmetoder inom gevärsskytte och geografiska informationssystem2004In: Kunskap och lärande i den högre utbildningen: lärarreflektioner från praktiken / [ed] Sara Dahlström och Göran Fransson, Gävle: Pedagogiska rådet, Högskolan i Gävle , 2004, p. 19-38Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Brandt, S. Anders
    University of Gävle, Department of Technology and Built Environment, Ämnesavdelningen för samhällsbyggnad.
    Geoinformatics 2004: Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Geoinformatics : Geospatial Information Research : Bridging the Pacific and Atlantic. University of Gävle, Sweden, 7-9 June 20042004Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    FOREWORD

    Geoinformatics 2004, the 12th International Conference on Geoinformatics, is the premier research forum for Geospatial Information Research. It commenced in 1992 in Buffalo, and has been held every year since. Meetings have been held in North America and Asia in Beijing (1993), Calgary (1994), Hong Kong (1995), West Palm Beach (1996), Taipei (1997), Beijing (1998), Ann Arbor (1999), Monterey (2000), Bangkok (2001), Nanjing (2002), and Toronto (2003, cancelled due to the outbreak of SARS). This is the premier event organized by the University of Gävle, together with the Association of Chinese Professionals in Geographic Information Science (CPGIS-abroad).

     

    This conference is the first of the series that takes place in Europe, hence the subtitle of the conference - bridging the Pacific and Atlantic. I believe it offers an opportunity for all professionals involved in research and development of geographic information systems, global position systems and remote sensing to discuss new theories and technologies around geoinformatics research.

     

    Based on the extended abstracts and following advice from the program committee, the organizing committee selected 108 papers (involving 264 authors from 29 different countries) around 10 different themes included in the proceedings. The conference themes include some emerging research issues such as location-based services and geovisualization as well as long studied conventional issues. As a post-conference publication effort, some selected papers around special themes will go another round of review process to be published in special issues with some scientific journals.

     

    The organization of the event is rather team-oriented work. On behalf of the organizing committee, I would like to thank CPGIS, the University of Gävle, our sponsors and all those individuals involved in making it a successful event, in particular, Kickan Fahlstedt, the conference secretary who took most administrative and organizational matters into her hands; Anders Brandt who read the papers and provided useful comments to the authors; Bengt Eriksson, Stig-Göran Mårtensson, and Bengt Rystedt who are always very supportive for the event; Peter Fisher and David Maguire who share their vision on current geoinformatics research; and all the authors who contribute with their papers of high quality.

     

    Last but not least, the following colleagues or students deserve special thanks for their contributions to the organization of the conference: Gunter Göckelmann, Pia Ollert- Hallqvist, Anna Hansson, Neta Hedberg, Elisabeth Hugg, Mikael Johansson, Rebecca Jonsson, Hendrik Loch, Bengt-Olof Lundinger, Staffan Nygren, Kaj Wejander, and Wenjun Xie.

     

    Welcome to the Geoinformatics 2004, and enjoy your stay in Gävle!

     

    Bin Jiang

    Co-chair of the organizing committee

     

    ---

     

    CONTENTS - VOLUME 1

    Keynote session

    The logic of fuzzy detecting change in geographical information, p. 3

    P. Fisher

    Distributed GIS: computing in the internet age, p. 4

    D. Maguire

    Plenary session

    About egocentric geovisualisation, p. 7

    L. Meng

    Shannonian, semantic and pragmatic geoinformation, p. 15

    J. Portugali

    Spatio-temporal modelling and analysis of geolifelines, p. 22

    C. Claramunt

    Location-based service, mobile GIS and GPS

    Location-based solutions for application services, p. 25

    K.H. Kim, S.G. Hong, J.H. Park and J.H. Lee

    A test-bed simulator for GPS and GIS integrated navigation and positioning research: - bus positioning, using GPS observations, odometer readings and map matching, p. 31

    J. Li, G. Taylor, C. Brunsdon, A. Olden, D. Steup and M. Winter

    Real-time map labelling for personal navigation, p.  39

    Q. Zhang and L. Harrie

    Multi-criteria decision analysis for location based services, p.  47

    M. Raubal and C. Rinner

    Map generalization for OSMasterMap data in location based services & mobile GIS applications, p. 54

    S. Anand, J.M. Ware and G.E. Taylor

    The media and the messages of location-based services (LBS): death of distance or the revenge of geography?, p. 61

    D.Z. Sui

    Real time community mapping: evaluating two wireless technology approaches, p. 69

    Y. Lao

    Digital data collection and analysis techniques for forestry applications, p. 77

    M.G. Wing and L.D. Kellogg

    A review of research and development on intelligent transport systems in Hong Kong - a geographic information system perspective, p. 84

    W.Z. Shi and H.K. Lam

    A distributed architecture for WAP-based mobile GIS, p. 92

    Wang F., Bian F. and Hou Y.

    Efficient routing service for the open LBS services, p. 99

    S.-S. Kim and J.-H. Park

    Network perspective for spatial data distribution on wireless environments, p. 107

    E. Lee, M.-J. Kim, M. Kim and B.-T. Jang

    Precise navigation with the use of buffer zones, p. 115

    A. Banachowicz and J. Uriasz

    The implementation of presentation service using JAVA web services, p. 120

    T.-W. Heo and J.-H. Park

    An open architecture of common core component for location based service, p. 127

    J.-C. Kim, J.-H. Park and J.-H. Lee

    Open LBS solution architecture using service chaining webservices technology, p. 134

    S.-G. Hong, K.-H. Kim and J.-H. Park

    Analysis accuracy integrated position of hyperbolic system JEMIOLUSZKA and satellite navigation system GPS, p. 139

    A. Banachowicz and R. Kamiński

    Spatio-temporal modelling and databases

    A web-based multimedia framework for diffusing spatio-temporal information: application to natural hazards, p. 149

    P-A. Davoine, J. Gensel and H. Martin

    Continuous data warehouse: concepts, challenges and potentials, p. 157

    T.O. Ahmed, M. Miquel and R. Laurini

    An extended locking method for geographical database with spatial rules, p. 165

    Cheng C., Shen P., Zhang M. and Lu F.

    A hybrid approach to detect spatial-temporal outliers, p. 173

    T. Cheng and Z. Li

    A knowledge-based restricted problem solving method in GIS applications, p. 179

    Wei H., Xu Q. and Bai Y.

    Representation of moving objects along a road network, p. 187

    N. Van de Weghe, A.G. Cohn, P. Bogaert and P. De Maeyer

    A three-dimensional temporal GIS for the analysis of morphometric changes, p. 195

    M. Sriti, R. Thibaud and C. Claramunt

    Quality assessment and uncertainty handling in spatial data mining, p. 203

    B. He, T. Fang and D. Guo

    From the schema matching to the integration of updating information into user geographic databases, p. 211

    A. Braun

    Construction and specification of spatial configurations in a geographical information retrieval context, p. 219

    M. Ould Ahmed Limam and M. Gaio

    A new tetrahedral network (TEN) generation algorithm for 3-D GIS, p. 226

    Song Z., Liu Y. and Niu W.

    GIS data modeling of 17th century fortresses on Dardanelles, p. 233

    C. Guney, B. Yuksel and R.N. Celik

    The spatial data server based on open GIS standards in heterogeneous distributed environment, p. 241

    M.-J. Kim, E. Lee, B.-W. Oh and M. Kim

    Vector cellular automata based geographical entity, p. 249

    Hu S. and Li D.

    A method for testing low-value spatial clustering, p. 257

    G. Lin and T. Zhang

    Research on Petri Net based spatiotemporal data model, p. 265

    Yin Z. and Li L.

    Advances in earth observation technologies

    Lossless inter-array predictive coding for subpixel-shifted satellite images based on texture analysis, p. 275

    Gao S., Zhang X.J. and Sun W.D.

    Visualizing distributions from multi-return lidar data to understand forest structure, p. 283

    D. Kao, M. Kramer, A. Love, J. Dungan and A. Pang

    3D scanning and photogrammetry for heritage recording: a comparison, p. 291

    W. Boehler and A. Marbs

    On modelling and visualisation of high resolution virtual environments using LIDAR data, p. 299

    S. Ahlberg, U. Söderman, M. Elmqvist and Å. Persson

    The utilization of GPR data in GIS, p.  307

    Chen B.Z., Hu Z.Q. and Li W.D.

    APIAS - Airborne photos and images attainment system, p. 311

    J.C.C. Gonçalves Junior, E.C. Piovesan, G.C. Silveira and E.A. Silva

    Geovisualisation

    Representation of geographic terrain surface using global indexing, p. 321

    J. Kolar

    Geo-visualization support for multidimensional clustering, p. 329

    G. Andrienko and N. Andrienko

    Annotated observations as knowledge construction elements in visual data analysis, p. 336

    I. Denisovich

    3D geovisualization as a communication and analysis tool in fluvial geomorphology, p. 339

    S.A. Brandt and B. Jiang

    A study on algorithms of a 3D visualization dynamic modification system based on TIN, p. 347

    P. Yang, H. Lin, S.J. Mao and D. Shen

    A multi-user mobile system to visualize environmental processes, p. 355

    J. Danado, E. Dias, T. Romão, N. Correia, A. Trabuco, C. Santos, J. Serpa, M. Costa and A. Câmara

    Interacting with 17th century fortresses on Dardanelles through web-based geo-visualization, p. 363

    C. Guney and R.N. Celik

    Visualization of landscape data in digital maps by exclusive use of XML-based languages, p. 370

    K. Neumann, P. Ahlbrecht, S. Eckstein, B. Mathiak and A. Kupfer

    Embedding digital rights in geovisualizations, p. 375

    J. Döllner

    Experimental research on web-based 3D terrain visualization - using Java3D and Microsoft.Net, p. 383

    Wang Y., Tan H. and Liu J.

    The principles of designing CIS - cartographic information system, p. 389

    Zheng S. and Chen Y.

    A network common data form (NetCDF) utility for efficient environmental data processing and visualization, p. 397

    J. Liu, J.M. Chen, D.T. Price, and S. Liu

    Design and implementation of high precision map symbol library based on GDI+, p. 405

    Wu X., Du Q., Cai Z. and Xu Z.

    User-centered 3D geovisualisation, p. 412

    A. Nielsen

    Studying groundwater resource by volume visualization technology, p. 417

    Zhu G., Xu Z., Wu X. and Yan H.

    Cognition theory-based research on adaptive user interface for GEO-visualization system, p. 424

    Ling Y., Chen Y. and Wang Y.

     

    CONTENTS - VOLUME 2

    GIS in urban planning and modelling

    Spatial patterns of urban growth in Nepal: a GIS-assisted analysis, p. 435

    M. Adhikari, B.A. Portnov and M. Schwartz

    What's planning (support system design)?, p. 443

    M. Campagna and G. Deplano

    GIS and remote sensing for urban planning: a case of Festac town, Lagos, Nigeria, p. 451

    M.J. Fasona and A.S. Omojola

    Geographical information systems on the web for public participation in planning, p. 459

    O. Gudes, E. Stern and T. Svoray

    Study on China National Park planning supported by spatial information technology, p. 464

    Dang A., Liu X., Yang R. and Zhuang Y.

    Uncertainty and data quality

    Uncertainty evaluation of military terrain analysis results by simulation and visualization, p. 473

    P. Horttanainen and K.Virrantaus

    Defuzzification operators for geographical data of nominal scale, p. 481

    T. Hatzichristos and J. Potamias

    Fuzzy model and Kriging for imprecise soil polygon boundaries, p. 489

    R. Sunila, E. Laine and O. Kremenova

    Fuzzy description of fuzzy direction relations and their similarities, p. 496

    Du S., Wang Q. and Yang Y.

    A new approach for modeling uncertainty in remote sensing change detection process, p. 503

    A. Alimohammadi, H.R. Rabiei and P.Z. Firouzabadi

    GIS in environmental management and decision making

    Mapping landslide susceptibility in the Three Gorges area, China using GIS, expert systems and fuzzy logic, p. 511

    A-X. Zhu, R. Wang, J. Qiao, Y. Chen, Q. Cai and C. Zhou

    A 3D GIS for managing building rehabilitation process, p. 518

    F. Ramos, D. Siret and M. Musy

    Spatial-temporal carbon sequestration under land USE and land cover change, p. 525

    S. Liu, J. Liu and T.R. Loveland

    GIS based analysis of store closure: a case study of an Office Depot store in Cincinnati, p. 533

    Y. Xu and L. Liu

    Branch bank closures in Sydney: a geographical perspective and analysis, p. 541

    L. Zhao, B. Garner and B. Parolin

    Integration of multidisciplinary knowledge and modelling techniques for a river-SDSS, p. 549

    J. Möltgen and G. Schmidt

    Applications of GIS and RS for land use dynamics monitoring in the rim zone of North China, p. 557

    Z. Qin, B. Xu, J. Liu and W. Zhang

    A methodology for siting a water harvesting reservoir, p. 565

    W.M. Jabre and F.A. Awar

    Landscape indices for comparison of spatial forest patterns in different geographical regions, p. 573

    E.M. De Clercq and R.R. De Wulf

    GIS in spatial management on a local level of administration in Poland, p. 578

    P. Fogel and J. Fiszczuk-Wiktorowicz

    Development of spatial GIS database for monitoring on dynamic state of grassland productivity, p. 585

    and animal loading balance in Northern China

    B. Xu, X. Xin, Z. Qin, H. Liu, Z. Chen, G. Yang, W. Wu, Q. Zhou and X. Wu

    Remote sensing coupled to a database of catchments and coastal zones, p. 593

    S.G. Halldórsdóttir and H. Þorbergsson

    Regionalization of N2O measurements for the North China Plain, p. 599

    G. Bareth and M. Kogge

    Application of RS and GIS in ecological environmental dynamic monitoring and management information system, p. 607

    Liao K.

    Geospatial cancer analysis for the state of Santa Catarina, brazil - environmental parameters considered, p. 615

    C.E. Hübner and F.H. Oliveira

    Information extraction from remote sensing data

    Object-based updating of land-use maps of urban areas using satellite remote sensing, p. 623

    R.J. Dekker

    Multiscale object-specific analysis: scale problems and multiscale solutions, p. 631

    O. Hall, G.J. Hay and D.J. Marceau

    A greedy point algorithm derived by Gabor filter bank for IKONOS satellite image segmentation, p. 639

    N. Nezamoddini-Kachouie and J. Alirezaie

    A modeling-based threshold approach to derive change/no change information over vegetation area, p. 647

    Y. Hu, S.M. de Jong and R. Sluiter

    A neural network approach for information extraction from remotely sensed data, p. 655

    J. Liu, G. Shao, H. Zhu and S. Liu

    New stereo matching and 3D view generation algorithms using aerial stereo images, p. 663

    J.-C. Kim and J.-H. Park

    Comparison of remote sensing based analysis of crop diseases by using high resolution multispectral and hyperspectral data - case study: Rhizoctonia solani in sugar beet -, p. 670

    R. Laudien, G. Bareth and R. Doluschitz

    A comparison of land-use classification with sampled IKONOS and TM imagery, p. 677

    Tang Z. and Zhu L.

    Quality study of ASTER data geometry by digitize contour lines in ILWIS, p. 683

    A. Partovi, K. Grabmaier and J. Hendrikse

    A new algorithm for map projection reverse transformation in GIS, p. 691

    Teng J., Huang W. and Sun M.

    Exploitation of geospatial techniques for studying the snow and water runoff parameters, p. 699

    A.S. Almas, M. Azam, M.J. Butt and S. Amer

    Land cover mapping of Khulna City applying remote sensing technique, p. 707

    M. Billah and G.A. Rahman

    Integration of ground sampling with satellite imaging through GIS database to monitor rangeland productivity for grazing in north China, p.  715

    Z. Qin, B. Xu, W. Li, W. Zhang and J. Liu

    Forestry inventory and information systems in developing countries: constraints and benefits, p. 723

    S.M. Malaza, P.G. Abbot and S. Mabena

    Multi-scale representation and generalisation

    Building a multi-granularity based spatial database, p. 733

    Cheng C. and Lu F.

    Automated generalisation in a multiple representation database, p. 741

    M. Dunkars

    Data update across multi-scale databases, p. 749

    H.-K. Kang, J.-W. Moon and K.-J. Li

    Modelling urban road networks integrating multiple representations of complex road and junction structures, p. 757

    N.N. Ulugtekin, A.O. Dogru and R.C. Thomson

    Streaming of compressed multi-resolution geographic vector data, p. 765

    J. Persson

    Metadata and spatial data infrastructure

    A hierarchical framework to aid the entry of metadata, p. 775

    J.-H. Hong, Y.-H. Chen and H.-P. Liao

    Building a taxonomy of GI knowledge - using Bloom's taxonomy to evaluate non-professional users' understanding of GI, p. 783

    M. Arleth

    Opportunities and challenges for SDI development in developing countries - a case study of, p. 789

    Uganda

    M. Musinguzi, G. Bax and S.S. Tickodri-Togboa

    SDI and network-based GIS for disaster management, p. 797

    A. Mansourian, A. Rajabifard and M.J.V. Zoej

    Discovering structure in geographical metadata, p. 805

    I. Podolak and U. Demšar

    Map interface valid coverage analysis based on XML metadata, p. 812

    H.-P. Liao and J.-H. Hong

    A cadastral domain model, p. 820

    J.M. Paasch

  • 23.
    Brandt, S. Anders
    University of Gävle, Department of Technology and Built Environment, Ämnesavdelningen för samhällsbyggnad.
    Rapport från Utbildningssektionens årliga utbildningskonferens2009In: Kart- & bildteknik, ISSN 1651-792X, Vol. 2009, no 3, p. 18-19Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Kartografiska sällskapets utbildningssektion genomför varje år de så kallade lärardagarna, en utbildningskonferens som kretsar kring geografisk information. Tilltänkta deltagare är alla, både utbildare och avnämare, som har intresse av utbildningsfrågor från skol- till universitetsnivå. Den 17 till 18 augusti detta år stod KTH som värd, med Hans Hauska hållande taktpinnen, och med 19 deltagare från ett tiotal olika arbetsgivare.

  • 24.
    Brandt, S. Anders
    University of Gävle, Department of Technology and Built Environment, Ämnesavdelningen för samhällsbyggnad.
    Resolution issues of elevation data during inundation modeling of river floods2005In: Proceedings of the XXXI IAHR Congress [Elektronisk resurs]: Water engineering for the future: choices and challenges. COEX Seoul September 11-16, 2005, Seoul: Korea Water Resources Association , 2005, p. 3573-3581Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A case study of the Eskilstuna River in Sweden is presented. This study is carried out within the project KRIS-GIS®, a Swedish initiative of handling crisis situations, including flooding. The purpose is to show how different resolutions in input elevation data affect the resulting inundation maps. Terrain elevation points at the sides of the river were gathered from an airborne laser altimetry survey, and river bed elevations were gathered from an echosounding survey. The terrain model was constructed in ArcView GIS as a triangulated irregular network (TIN), which served as the base for all later modeling. The hydraulic modeling was done as one-dimensional steady flow in HEC-RAS flow routing software. High-resolution elevation data resulted in better inundation delineation than did lowresolution elevation data. If the mean water discharge was used in the modeling and if the river is narrow, a low resolution could even lead to that the river itself would not be marked as inundated. At high water discharges, the river was usually inundated, but there was great uncertainty if the riparian areas really would be flooded or not. With steep side slopes, the delineation of inundation becomes more certain, while at gentler side slopes, the flow is distributed on a larger surface with a risk that the raster cells will be incorrectly marked regarding inundation. Finally, the use of high-resolution elevation data compared with lowresolution data, makes estimates of friction factor, Manning’s n, relatively more important for correct results in inundation studies.

  • 25.
    Brandt, S. Anders
    University of Gävle, Department of Technology and Built Environment, Ämnesavdelningen för samhällsbyggnad.
    Svensk kartografiutbildning i ett historiskt perspektiv2008In: Kartan i våra hjärtan: Kartografiska Sällskapet 100 år 2008, Stockholm: Kartografiska Sällskapet , 2008, p. 305-318Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 26.
    Brandt, S. Anders
    University of Gävle, Department of Technology and Built Environment, Ämnesavdelningen för samhällsbyggnad.
    Översvämningsmodellering i GIS: betydelse av höjdmodellers upplösning applicerat på Eskilstunaån - ett delprojekt i KRIS-GIS®2005Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Under senare tid har översvämningar alltmer uppmärksammats av allmänhet, politiker, myndigheter och organisationer. Samtidigt har allt fler insett att det inte är en fråga om en översvämning kommer att ske utan när och hur stor den blir. Detta innebär att översvämningsrisker ständigt måste vara en närvarande del i politikers, planerares och krisberedskapsorganisationers arbete. Ett sätt att vara väl förberedd inför översvämningar är att ta fram översvämningsområden för olika stora vattenflöden. Därför har det inom projektet KRIS-GIS®, beställt och finansierat av Krisberedskapsmyndigheten, gjorts en mer detaljerad specialstudie över översvämningar kring Eskilstunaån. Tillförlitligheten hos framtagna översvämningsområden beror framför allt av två faktorer: korrekt vattenflödessimulering och korrekt beskrivning av terrängen. I denna studie har den endimensionella modellen HEC-RAS använts för flödessimuleringen och för beskrivning av terrängen har en flygburen 3D-laserskanning över området kring Eskilstunaån utförts. Dessutom har ekolodning utförts för att möjliggöra beskrivning av bottentopografin i Eskilstunaån. Samtliga höjddatapunkter kopplades ihop i ett GIS till ett triangulärt oregelbundet nätverk, TIN. Därefter lades sektioner tvärs över vattendraget och omgivande terräng. Dessa tvärsektioner tilldelades höjdvärden från TIN-modellen innan de exporterades till HEC-RAS. Fyra olika vattenföringar simulerades i HEC-RAS: medelvattenföringen på 23,7 m3/s, årsfloden på 70 m3/s, 100-årsflödet på 123 m3/s samt högsta beräknade flödet på 198 m3/s. Dessutom har det gjorts några alternativa körningar med varierande värden på Mannings n, dvs. markfriktion. Efter körningar i HEC-RAS, exporterades resulterande vattennivåer tillbaka till GISet där ett resultatraster skapades, där varje rastercell visades som översvämmad eller ej, och i förekommande fall översvämmat djup. Resultaten av översvämningsanalyserna visar att betydligt säkrare översvämningsprognoser nu kan göras när tillgång till terrängmodeller av hög kvalitet finns. Vid tidigare studier har Lantmäteriets höjddatabas använts, där höjder finns representerade med ett värde per 50-metersruta. Från att terrängmodellen har varit den begränsande faktorn övergår i stället en korrekt beskrivning av markens råhet eller friktion, uttryckt som Mannings n, till att vara den begränsande faktorn. Det rekommenderas därför att differentiera råhetsvärdena beroende på vilken markanvändningstyp som finns längs med vattendraget. Speciellt viktigt är detta i flacka områden. För Eskilstunaåns nordligaste delar är det viktigt att vattennivån i Mälaren bedöms korrekt. För att sprida och kunna dra nytta av resultaten framtagna i KRIS-GIS®-projektet rekommenderas det att färdiga översvämningspolygoner kan användas av kommuner, räddningstjänst osv. i deras arbete. De kan ringa eller automatiskt få information, från t.ex. SMHI eller vattenregleringsföretag, som innehåller upplysningar om förväntade flöden. Motsvarande polygon för förväntat flöde visas i ett GIS och direkt har man lägesbilden klart för sig. Utöver detta har även visualiseringsaspekter behandlats.

  • 27.
    Brandt, S. Anders
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Department of Technology and Built Environment, Ämnesavdelningen för samhällsbyggnad.
    Arnberg, Wolter
    Stockholm University.
    A harmonized GIS course curriculum for Swedish universities2007In: EUC'07 HERODOT Proceedings: ESRI European User Conference 2007: Stockholm, Sweden, 25-27 September 2007, 2007, p. 10 s.-Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    With the implementation of the Bologna declaration, European and other universities must change or adjust courses and programmes so they fit into the Bologna model. In Sweden this will take place during 2007. The intention with the declaration, for example, is that a basic course in one subject at one university should be treated as equivalent to the same type of course at another university. Once a year, the recently formed section for education of the Swedish Cartographic Society gathers university lecturers and others for an education conference to discuss matters concerning higher education in geomatics, geoinformatics, geography, etc. Last year’s conference identified the need for a harmonized course curriculum in basic GIS. One of the advantages of such a course is easier transfer of study records for inclusion of course credits in study programmes at other universities. Therefore, an attempt has been made to write a harmonized course curriculum for basic GIS. The course will contain about 50% common content and about 50% of content decided by the individual university. The common content will be described as learning outcomes, and then it is up to the universities to place the learning outcomes into a context. Thanks to this common core, the course can be given for such diverse programmes as archaeology, land surveying, or economy, and still be able to include the required knowledge for students to continue on more advanced courses at other universities.

  • 28.
    Brandt, S. Anders
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Department of Technology and Built Environment, Ämnesavdelningen för samhällsbyggnad.
    Bergquist, Arne
    Lantmäteriet.
    Översvämningskarteringars tillförlitlighet2009In: Kart & Bildteknik (Mapping and Image Science), ISSN 1651-792X, no 4, p. 33-35Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    I ett tidigare nummer av Kart & Bildteknik beskrevs ett pågående forskningsprojekt som försökte ta reda på om det finns en optimal kvalitet på geografisk information som underlag för detaljerad översvämningskartering (Bergquist, Brandt & Klang, 2008). Projektet är nu avslutat och avrapporterat i Brandt (2009) och Klang och Klang (2009). Av resultaten framgår bland annat hur mycket tillförlitligheten av en översvämningskartering minskar med graden av försämrad höjdmodell, vilken utgör ett av de viktigaste underlagen för en översvämningsanalys. I samband med EUs översvämningsdirektiv (Europaparlamentets och rådets direktiv, 2007) föranleder detta en diskussion om vilka översvämningskarteringar som krävs för att uppfylla direktivet.

  • 29.
    Brandt, S. Anders
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Department of Technology and Built Environment, Ämnesavdelningen för samhällsbyggnad.
    Larsson, Anders
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Kartografiska Sällskapets utbildningssektion: ett nytt tillskott i KS-familjen2006In: Kart- & bildteknik, ISSN 1651-792X, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 10-11Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    På Kartografiska Sällskapets årsmöte i Jönköping den 21 mars beslutades att inrätta en ny sektion inom sällskapet – en utbildningssektion. Denna artikel beskriver bakgrunden till sektionen och dess verksamhetsidé. Utbildningssektionens embryo tillkom för tre år sedan efter förslag från ULI som delegerade uppgiften till Geomatikprogrammet vid Högskolan i Gävle. Tanken vara att skapa ett forum för lärare inom geomatikområdet. Både för att sammanföra lärare från olika lärosäten, för att öka förståelsen för varandras arbeten, och för att kunna förbättra möjligheterna till samarbete.

  • 30.
    Bransell, Åsa
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electronics, Mathematics and Natural Sciences.
    Vinter i trädgården: Ett formgivningsförslag för en attraktivare utemiljö vintertid2012Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 31.
    Bringmark, Ewa
    et al.
    Department of Aquatic Sciences and Assessment, SLU, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Bringmark, Lage
    Department of Aquatic Sciences and Assessment, SLU, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Sonesten, Lars
    Department of Aquatic Sciences and Assessment, SLU, Uppsala, Sweden .
    Mjöfors, Kristina
    Department of Soil and Environment, SLU, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Johansson, Maj-Britt
    University of Gävle.
    Long-term monitoring of scots pine litter decomposition rates throughout sweden indicates formation of a more recalcitrant litter in the south2011In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 40, no 8, p. 878-890Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Decomposition studies were carried out at sites throughout Sweden, including the four Integrated Monitoring sites. Scots pine needle litterbag weight loss measurements over 3 or 5 years were determined at 26 sites and repeated up to 27 times, depending on the site. Humus layer respiration rates were determined for 20 sites in 1987-1989 and repeated in 2007-2008. Partial Least Squares (PLS) regression was used to elucidate the relative importance of climatic and soil factors. Annual needle weight losses decreased only slowly (20-10%) over 3-5 years for all northern (> 60A degrees N) sites but decreased sharply from 30 to 10% in the third year in southern (< 60A degrees N) sites. Respiration rates of southern sites were less (40% on average) than those of northern sites. Humus layer N was positively correlated to needle weight loss during the first and the second years, but negatively correlated in the third year and to respiration rates. The results indicated that litter formed in southern Sweden became more recalcitrant in later stages of decomposition compared to litter produced in northern Sweden.

  • 32.
    BUCCARDO, ALDO
    University of Gävle, Center for RF Measurement Technologies. University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electronics, Mathematics and Natural Sciences.
    A SIGNAL DETECTOR FOR COGNITIVE RADIO SYSTEM2010Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 30 credits / 45 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The communication systems are changing. Cognitive Radio is an automatic adaptative system to improve the spectrum efficiency. It has intelligence to adapt itself to the environment to improve the transmission performancies. For this system, spectrum sensing function is very important so a signal detector is necessary. In this work a signal detector has been implemented in GNU Radio environment. GNU Radio is a platform that respects the Cognitive Radio aproach. It is flexible, software defined and cheap.

  • 33.
    Bui, Tuyet T. A.
    et al.
    Laboratory of Fruit Breeding and Biotechnology, Department of Biosystems, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
    Wright, Sandra A. I.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electrical Engineering, Mathematics and Science, Biology.
    Falk, Anders B.
    Valthornsvagen, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Vanwalleghem, Tanja
    Department of Mycology, Proefcentrum Fruitteelt vzw, Sint-Truiden, Belgium.
    Van Hemelrijck, Wendy
    Department of Mycology, Proefcentrum Fruitteelt vzw, Sint-Truiden, Belgium.
    Hertog, Maarten L.A.T.M.
    Division of MeBioS, Department of Biosystems, Faculty of Bioscience Engineer-ing, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
    Keulemans, Johan
    Laboratory of Fruit Breeding and Biotechnology, Department of Biosystems, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
    Davey, Mark W.
    Laboratory of Fruit Breeding and Biotechnology, Department of Biosystems, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
    Botrytis cinerea differentially induces postharvest antioxidant responses in 'Braeburn' and 'Golden Delicious' apple fruit2019In: Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture, ISSN 0022-5142, E-ISSN 1097-0010, Vol. 99, no 13, p. 5662-5670Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The fruit of two apple cultivars - 'Braeburn', which is susceptible to inoculation with Botrytis cinerea, and the less susceptible cv. 'Golden Delicious' - were investigated with respect to their response to inoculation with B. cinerea. Successful infection by B. cinerea leads to an oxidative burst and perturbation of plant redox homeostasis. To investigate the interaction between apple fruit and B. cinerea, antioxidant metabolism in fruit samples from sun-exposed and shaded sides of different tissue types was measured over time.

    RESULTS: The sun-exposed tissue of 'Braeburn' had higher initial levels of total vitamin C in the peel and phenolic compounds in the flesh than 'Golden Delicious', despite its greater susceptibility to gray mold. A substantial antioxidant response was recorded in diseased 'Braeburn' fruit 14 days after inoculation, which involved an elevated superoxide dismutase activity and ascorbate peroxidase activity, a progressive oxidation of total vitamin C, and a decrease in peroxidase activity and phenolic content. Disease development was slower on the sun-exposed sides than on the shaded sides.

    CONCLUSION: The two cultivars appeared to utilize different strategies to defend themselves against B. cinerea. 'Golden Delicious' almost entirely escaped infection. Preharvest exposure of apple fruit to high light / temperature stress appears to prepare them to better resist subsequent postharvest attack and disease. 

  • 34.
    Butler, Andrew
    et al.
    Institutionen för Stad och Land, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden; Faculty of Landscape and Society, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Ås, Norway.
    Sarlöv-Herlin, Ingrid
    Institutionen för landskapsarkitektur, planering och förvaltning, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Knez, Igor
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Psychology.
    Ångman, Elin
    Institutionen för Stad och Land, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Ode Sang, Åsa
    Institutionen för landskapsarkitektur, planering och förvaltning, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Åkerskog, Ann
    FieldForest Research Institute, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Landscape identity, before and after a forest fire2018In: Landscape research, ISSN 0142-6397, E-ISSN 1469-9710, Vol. 43, no 6, p. 878-889Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Our identity is tied to where we are and how we engage with the landscapes in which we find ourselves. But what happens if the landscape which we use for our everyday life is drastically altered by a catastrophic upheaval, for example, when forest fires ravage the landscape? In this paper, interviews with individuals affected by the largest forest fire in modern Swedish history are used to exemplify our conceptualisation of how landscape identity is impacted by dramatic change. We address the phases of stability, change and progression in relation to the case. Finally, we propose that landscape identity can be utilised as a central concept for engaging with the social aspects of the impact of forest fires.

  • 35.
    Børja, Isabella
    et al.
    orwegian Forest and Landscape Institute, Ås, Norway.
    de Wit, Helene A.
    Norwegian Institute for Water Research ( NIVA), Oslo, Norway.
    Steffenrem, Arne
    orwegian Forest and Landscape Institute, Ås, Norway.
    Majdi, Hooshang
    Department of Ecology and Environmental Research, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Stand age and fine root biomass, distribution and morphology in a Norway spruce chronosequence in southeast Norway2008In: Tree Physiology, ISSN 0829-318X, E-ISSN 1758-4469, Vol. 28, no 5, p. 773-784Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We assessed the influence of stand age on fine root biomass and morphology of trees and understory vegetation in 10-, 30-, 60- and 120-year-old Norway spruce stands growing in sandy soil in southeast Norway. Fine root (< 1, 1–2 and 2–5 mm in diameter) biomass of trees and understory vegetation (< 2 mm in diameter) was sampled by soil coring to a depth of 60 cm. Fine root morphological characteristics, such as specific root length (SRL), root length density (RLD), root surface area (RSA), root tip number and branching frequency (per unit root length or mass), were determined based on digitized root data. Fine root biomass and morphological characteristics related to biomass (RLD and RSA) followed the same tendency with chronosequence and were significantly higher in the 30-year-old stand and lower in the 10-year-old stand than in the other stands. Among stands, mean fine root (< 2 mm) biomass ranged from 49 to 398 g m–2, SLR from 13.4 to 19.8 m g–1, RLD from 980 to 11,650 m m–3 and RSA from 2.4 to 35.4 m2 m–3. Most fine root biomass of trees was concentrated in the upper 20 cm of the mineral soil and in the humus layer (0–5 cm) in all stands. Understory fine roots accounted for 67 and 25% of total fine root biomass in the 10- and 120-year-old stands, respectively. Stand age had no affect on root tip number or branching frequency, but both parameters changed with soil depth, with increasing number of root tips and decreasing branching frequency with increasing soil depth for root fractions < 2 mm in diameter. Specific (mass based) root tip number and branching density were highest for the finest roots (< 1 mm) in the humus layer. Season (spring or fall) had no effect on tree fine root biomass, but there was a small and significant increase in understory fine root biomass in fall relative to spring. All morphological characteristics showed strong seasonal variation, especially the finest root fraction, with consistently and significantly higher values in spring than in fall. We conclude that fine root biomass, especially in the finest fraction (< 1 mm in diameter), is strongly dependent on stand age. Among stands, carbon concentration in fine root biomass was highest in the 30-year-old stand, and appeared to be associated with the high tree and canopy density during the early stage of stand development. Values of RLD and RSA, morphological features indicative of stand nutrient-uptake efficiency, were higher in the 30-year-old stand than in the other stands.

  • 36.
    Calamnius, Linda
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Biology. Institute of Freshwater Research, Department of Aquatic Resources, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lundin, Mikael
    Harmångers Machine & Marine, Stocka, Sweden; Department of Wildlife, Fish and Environmental studies, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Fjälling, Arne
    Institute of Freshwater Research, Department of Aquatic Resources, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Königson, Sara
    Institute of Coastal Research, Department of Aquatic Resources, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Lysekil, Sweden.
    Pontoon trap for salmon and trout equipped with a seal exclusion device catches larger salmons2018In: PLoS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 7, article id e0201164Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The growing seal populations of the Baltic have led to more frequent interactions with coastal fisheries. The motivation for seals to interact with fishing gear is high. It provides high densities of fish. A successful means of mitigating the conflict is the pontoon trap. Seal visits here have been frequent. Seals have access to most parts of the trap system including the middle chamber, which is an overhead environment. Concerns have been raised about seals possible entanglement in this specific part of the trap. As a means of keeping seals from entering the middle chamber, two different Seal Exclusion Devices (SEDs) were tested. A diamond mesh SED and a square mesh SED, which was rotated 45. The aim was to compare the functionality of the different SEDs with respect to seal deterrent abilities and catch composition. The hypothesis tested were (i) that seals would not be able to enter the middle chamber, (ii) that the catch would increase and (iii) that the SED would deter larger fish from swimming into the middle chamber. Catch data and underwater film were collected. Larger salmons were caught in traps equipped with SEDs. The SEDs did not affect the number of caught fish or the total catch per soak day. © 2018 Calamnius et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

  • 37.
    Carlsson, Christian
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electronics, Mathematics and Natural Sciences.
    Baljväxter på bordet: En undersökning av svensk ekologisk yrkesodling av baljväxter för humankonsumtion och potentialen för en utökad odling2012Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Baljväxter kan utgöra ett hälsosamt och klimatvänligt alternativ till kött. Med lämpliga tillagningsmetoder utgör deras innehåll av osmältbara ämnen inget problem. I dagsläget importeras den största delen av färska och torkade baljväxter som konsumeras i Sverige. En ökad inhemsk ekologisk yrkesodling av baljväxter skulle föra med sig fördelar i form av minskad användning av gödningsmedel och gynnande effekter i ett växelbruk. I Sverige odlas i stort sett bara ärter och bruna bönor som livsmedel. En anledning till att inte fler arter odlas storskaligt är att det svenska klimatet är lite för kärvt, särskilt för bönodling. En annan anledning är att de gamla arter och sorter som förr fanns i lokal odling har fasats ut av förändrade kostvanor och mer rationella odlingssystem. Det finns exempel på nya baljväxter som skulle kunna lämpa sig för en svensk odling, men här uppstår ett moment 22-läge; inga lantbrukare vågar börja odla utan en säker efterfrågan, och handeln vågar inte ta in nya grödor i sitt sortiment utan ett stabilt odlarunderlag. Både odlare och handel anser att en utökad svensk ekologisk baljväxtodling för humankonsumtion till stor del hänger på en förändrad matkultur. Detta kan uppnås genom att framta nya produkter eller förändra synen på de svenska baljväxterna som råvara. Den existerande odlingens framtid påverkas till stor del av vilka olika ekonomiska stöd som utbetalas, detta gäller inte minst odlingen av bruna bönor på Öland.

  • 38.
    Carpenter, Angela
    et al.
    School of Earth and Environment, University of Leeds, United Kingdom; Centre for Marine and Coastal Policy Research, Plymouth University, United Kingdom.
    Shellock, Rebecca
    Plymouth Marine Laboratory, United Kingdom; European Centre for Environment and Human Health, University of Exeter, Truro, United Kingdom.
    von Haartman, Robin
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Stephen, Fletcher
    UN Environment World Conservation Monitoring Centre, United Kingdom.
    Glegg, Gillian
    Centre for Marine and Coastal Policy Research, Plymouth University, United Kingdom.
    Public perceptions of management priorities for the English Channel region2018In: Marine Policy, ISSN 0308-597X, E-ISSN 1872-9460, Vol. 97, p. 294-304Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The English Channel region is an area of high conservational importance, as well being a contributor to economic prosperity, social well-being and quality of life of the people living around it. There is a need to incorporate societal elements into marine and coastal governance, to improve management of the Channel ecosystem. Public Perception Research (PPR) is a relatively unexplored dimension of marine science, with limited research at the scale of the Channel region. Using an online survey, this study examined the public's use of, and funding priorities for, the Channel's marine and coastal environment. It revealed that there are variations in how the English and French coastlines are used. Environmental issues were generally viewed as being more important than economic ones. Country-level differences were observed for public uses of, and priorities for the Channel region. Cleaner water and beaches, and improved coastal flood defences, were more highly prioritised by English respondents, while offshore renewable energy and sustainability of businesses were more highly prioritised by French respondents. The paper contributes to the debate on the value of PPR by addressing evidence gaps in the English Channel region, and to PPR literature more broadly. It provides baseline data to inform future engagement strategies for the marine and coastal governance of the Channel region specifically. It also identifies how this type of research has implications for the wider marine and coastal environment, including contributing to Sustainable Development Goal 14 on conserving and sustainably using the oceans, seas, and marine resources.

  • 39.
    Castoria, Raffaello
    et al.
    Università degli studi del Molise.
    Wright, Sandra A. I.
    University of Gothenburg and Università degli studi del Molise.
    Host responses to biological control agents2010In: Post-harvest pathology / [ed] D. Prusky & M.L. Gullino, Dordrecht: Springer Netherlands, 2010, p. 171-181Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Chilo, José
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electronics, Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Electronics.
    Pelegri-Sebastia, José
    Universitat Politècnica de València, Valencia, Spain.
    Cupane, Maria
    University of Palermo, Palermo, Italy.
    Sogorb, Tomas
    Universitat Politècnica de València, Valencia, Spain.
    E-nose application to food industry production2016In: IEEE Instrumentation & Measurement Magazine, ISSN 1094-6969, E-ISSN 1941-0123, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 27-33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Food companies worldwide must constantly engage in product development to stay competitive, cover existing markets, explore new markets, and meet key consumer requirements. This ongoing development places high demands on achieving quality at all levels, particularly in terms of food safety, integrity, quality, nutrition, and other health effects. Food product research is required to convert the initial product idea into a formulation for upscaling production with ensured significant results. Sensory evaluation is an effective component of the whole process. It is especially important in the last step in the development of new products to ensure product acceptance. In that stage, measurements of product aroma play an important role in ensuring that consumer expectations are satisfied. To this end, the electronic nose (e-nose) can be a useful tool to achieve this purpose. The e-nose is a combination of various sensors used to detect gases by generating signals for an analysis system. Our research group has investigated the scent factor in some foodstuff and attempted to develop e-noses based on low-cost technology and compact size. In this paper, we present a summary of our research to date on applications of the e-nose in the food industry.

  • 41.
    Colding, Johan
    Department of Systems Ecology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Analysis of hunting options by the use of general food taboos1998In: Ecological Modelling, ISSN 0304-3800, E-ISSN 1872-7026, Vol. 110, no 1, p. 5-17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A hypothetical model was built, using the STELLA II software program, to test several hunting options for a human hunting group. Different outcomes of possible hunting modes are analysed, such as a change in hunting rate, prey hunted, or species avoided or not avoided by taboos. The model consists of five sectors that reflect a short food chain in an upper Amazonian ecosystem. There is a vegetation sector, a predator sector, and two sectors consisting of browsers and grazers. The last sector represents a human group, known as the Ecuador Achuar. The critical factor analysed is how differences in hunting rate affect a target resource, and how this resource may be affected by general food taboos. The major results of the model are that general food taboos may not be an adaptive short term strategy for hunters, but that a 'moderate' hunting mode may be the most effective option for the human group. Since the model is a simplification of the real world, no general conclusions for management should be drawn from the results.

  • 42.
    Colding, Johan
    Beijer Institute of Ecological Economics, Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Systems Ecology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ecologists as the new management elite?2000In: Conservation ecology, ISSN 1195-5449, E-ISSN 1195-5449, Vol. 4, no 2, p. XXV-XXVIArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Colding, Johan
    et al.
    Department of Systems Ecology, Center for Research on Natural Resources and the Environment, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden; Beijer International Institute of Ecological Economics, Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Folke, Carl
    Department of Systems Ecology, Center for Research on Natural Resources and the Environment, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden; Beijer International Institute of Ecological Economics, Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Social taboos: "Invisible" systems of local resource management and biological conservation2001In: Ecological Applications, ISSN 1051-0761, E-ISSN 1939-5582, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 584-600Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Social taboos exist in most cultures, both Western and non-Western. They are good examples of informal institutions, where norms, rather than governmental juridical laws and rules, determine human behavior. In many traditional societies throughout the world, taboos frequently guide human conduct toward the natural environment. Based on a survey of recent literature, we synthesize information on such taboos. We refer to them as "resource and habitat taboos" (RHTs). Examples are grouped in six different categories depending on their potential nature conservation and management functions. We compare RHTs with contemporary measures of conservation and identify and discuss some key benefits that may render them useful in partnership designs for conservation and management. We conclude that many RHTs have functions similar to those of formal institutions for nature conservation in contemporary society but have not been sufficiently recognized in this capacity. We suggest that designs for conservation of biological diversity and its sustainable use in developing countries focus more on informal institutions, like social taboos, because they may offer several advantages compared to conventional measures. These include non-costly, voluntary compliance features implicit in the taboo system.

  • 44.
    Colding, Johan
    et al.
    Beijer International Institute of Ecological Economics, Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Systems Ecology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Folke, Carl
    Beijer International Institute of Ecological Economics, Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Systems Ecology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    The relations among threatened species, their protection, and taboos1997In: Ecology & society, ISSN 1708-3087, E-ISSN 1708-3087, Vol. 1, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We analyzed the role of taboos for the protection of species listed as "threatened" by the World Conservation Union (IUCN), and also for species known to be endemic and keystone. The study was limited to taboos that totally avoid or prohibit any use of particular species and their populations. We call them specific-species taboos. Through a literature review, 70 currently existing examples of specific-species taboos were identified and analyzed. The species avoided were grouped into biological classes. Threat categories were determined for each species, based on the IUCN Red Data Book. We found that ≃ 30% of the identified taboos prohibit any use of species listed as threatened by IUCN. Of the specific-species taboos, 60% are set on reptiles and mammals. In these two classes, ≃ 50% of the species are threatened, representing all of the threatened species in our analysis, with the exception of one bird species. Both endemic and keystone species that are important for ecosystem functions are avoided by specific-species taboos. Specific-species taboos have important ecological ramifications for the protection of threatened and ecologically important populations of species. We do not suggest that specific-species taboos are placed on species because they are, or have been, endangered; instead, we emphasize that species are avoided for a variety of other reasons. It is urgent to identify and analyze resource practices and social mechanisms of traditional societies, such as taboos, and to investigate their possible ecological significance. Although it may provide insights of value for conservation, not only of species,

  • 45.
    Colding, Johan
    et al.
    Department of Systems Ecology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden; Center for Research on Natural Resources and the Environment, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden; Beijer International Institute of Ecological Economics, Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Folke, Carl
    Department of Systems Ecology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden; Center for Research on Natural Resources and the Environment, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden; Beijer International Institute of Ecological Economics, Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden.
    The taboo system: Lessons about informal institutions for nature management2000In: Georgetown International Environmental Law Review, ISSN 1042-1858, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 413-445Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 46.
    Colding, Johan
    et al.
    The Beijer International Institute of Ecological Economics, Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Folke, Carl
    The Department of Systems Ecology, Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Elmqvist, Tomas
    The Department of Systems Ecology, Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Social institutions in ecosystem management and biodiversity conservation2003In: Tropical Ecology, ISSN 0564-3295, Vol. 44, no 1, p. 25-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This synthesis addresses local institutions and associated management practices related to natural resources and ecosystem dynamics, with an emphasis on traditional ecological knowledge systems. Traditional practices for ecosystem management include multiple species management, resource rotation, ecological monitoring, succession management, landscape patchiness management and practices of responding to and managing pulses and ecological surprises. There exist practices that seem to reduce social-ecological crises in the events of large-scale natural disturbance such as creating small-scale ecosystem renewal cycles, spreading risks and nurturing sources of ecosystem reorganization and renewal. Ecological knowledge and monitoring among local groups appears to be a key element in the development of many of the practices. The practices are linked to social mechanisms such as flexible user rights and land tenure; adaptations for the generation, accumulation and transmission of ecological knowledge; dynamics of institutions; mechanisms for cultural internalization of traditional practices; and associated worldviews and cultural values. We dive deeper into the role of informal social institutions in resource management, such as many taboo systems. We find that taboos may contribute to the conservation of habitats, local subsistence resources and 'threatened', 'endemic' and 'keystone' species, although some may run contrary to conservation and notions of sustainability. It is asserted that under certain circumstances, informal institutions may offer advantages relative to formal measures of conservation. These benefits include non-costly, voluntary compliance features. Since management of ecosystems is associated with uncertainty about their spatial and temporal dynamics and due to incomplete knowledge about such dynamics, local management practices and associated institutions may provide useful 'rules of thumb' for resource management with an ability to confer resilience and tighten environmental feedbacks of resource exploitation to local levels.

  • 47.
    Collentine, Dennis
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Business and Economic Studies, Economics.
    Johnsson, Holger
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Larsson, Peter
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Markensten, Hampus
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Wallin, Mats
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Developing catchment level measures to reduce eutrophication: The crop rotation coefficient calculator in the DSS FyrisCOST2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 48.
    Collentine, Dennis
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Business and Economic Studies, Economics.
    Johnsson, Holger
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Markensten, Hampus
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Persson, Kristian
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Larsson, Peter
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    The comparative cost efficiency of three buffer zone programs to reduce phosphorus losses in a small Swedish catchment2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Collentine, Dennis
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Business and Economic Studies, Economics.
    Johnsson, Holger
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Persson, Kristian
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Markensten, Hampus
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Larsson, Peter
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    The comparative cost efficiency of three buffer zone programs to reduce phosphorus losses in a small Swedish catchment2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Dahlgren, Magdalena
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electronics, Mathematics and Natural Sciences.
    Byta lind mot lind: En studie om trädbyten vid historiska anläggningar2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to examine how a tree replacement is carried out in a place that is protected as a cultural heritage. The places described are the Baroque garden in Uppsala Botanical Gardens and the baroque garden in the palace garden at Drottningholm. Both gardens are owned by the state and managed by the National Property Board. The National Heritage Board has overall responsibility that the facilities are not distorted. The Botanical Garden in Uppsala belongs to Uppsala University and is managed by the University. The gardens have a high historical value that make them worthy of protection. Because of this there are restrictions and regulations that dictate how the locations should be maintained and administered. The thesis is based on interviews with the project manager for both of the tree-replacements and the garden Director and 1st gardener at the Botanical Garden in Uppsala. The old lime trees at Drottningholm were planted in the late 1600s and early 1700s and was largely dutch lime, Tilia x europaea 'Pallida', imported from Holland. The old lime trees in the botanical garden was planted in the 1970s, when the garden was restored under the direction of Walter Bauer. The tree replacement at Drottningholm was conducted between 1997–2011 in five stages and the restoration in the Botanical Garden is carried out in autumn 2016 and is expected to be completed in June 2017. Both the construction work and a five-year warranty maintenance is performed under contract. The paper describes what influences the choice of the trees at the facilities. There have been studies to determine the species and varieties of the original lime trees in the avenues at Drottningholm. The new lime trees planted there and those that will be planted in the spring of 2017 in the Botanical Garden, are of the same type as the original lime trees at Drottningholm. A large number of measures have been carried out at the installation and maintenance of the trees to ensure that they establish themselves properly and develop well.

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