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  • 1.
    Berg, Björn
    et al.
    Dipartimento biologia strutturale e funzionale, Complesso universitario di Monte S. Angelo, Napoli, Italy; Department of forest ecology, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Davey, M. P.
    Department of plant sciences, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom.
    De Marco, A.
    Dipartimento biologia strutturale e funzionale, Complesso universitario di Monte S. Angelo, Napoli, Italy.
    Emmett, B
    Centre for ecology and hydrology, Bangor.
    Faituri, M.
    Department of soils and water, Omar AlMukhtar university, Elbeida, Libyan Arab Jamahiriya.
    Hobbie, S. E.
    Department of ecology, evolution and behavior, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, USA.
    Johansson, Maj-Britt
    University of Gävle.
    Liu, C.
    Department of landscape science and engineering, College of agriculture and biology, Shanghai, ChinaShanghai Jiao Tong university,.
    McClaugherty, C.
    Department of biology, Mount Union college, Alliance, USA.
    Norell, L.
    Unit of applied statistics and mathematics, SLU, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Rutigliano, F. A.
    Dipartimento di scienze ambientali, Seconda Università degli studi di Napoli, Caserta, Italy.
    Vesterdal, L.
    Forest & landscape Denmark, University of Copenhagen, Hørsholm, Denmark.
    Virzo De Santo, A.
    Dipartimento biologia strutturale e funzionale, Complesso universitario de Monte S. Angelo, Napoli, Italy.
    Factors influencing limit values for pine needle litter decomposition: A synthesis for boreal and temperate pine forest systems2010In: Biogeochemistry, ISSN 0168-2563, E-ISSN 1573-515X, Vol. 100, no 1, p. 57-73Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We synthesized available data for decomposition of pine (Pinus) needle litter in pine forests to determine the litter chemical characteristics and climate factors that explained variation in the limit value, i. e. the level of accumulated mass loss at which the decomposition process either continues at a very low rate or possibly stops. Our data base included 56 separate studies on decomposition of pine needle litter, spanning Scots pine, lodgepole pine, Aleppo pine, stone pine and white pine, mainly incubated at the site of collection. Studies had 5 to 19 samplings, on average 10, and the decomposition was followed to a mass loss ranging from 47 to 83%, on average 67%. The periods from 3.0 to 5.4 years, on average 3.9 years, were of sufficient duration to allow estimates of limit values of decomposition. We used a linear mixed model with regression effects to relate limit values to potential explanatory variables, namely the sites' long-term mean annual temperature (MAT) and mean annual precipitation (MAP) and to substrate-chemistry factors. Regarding the latter, we explored two models; one that included initial concentrations of water solubles, lignin, N, P, K, Ca, Mg, and Mn and one that included only lignin, N, Ca, and Mn to focus on those nutrients known to influence lignin degradation. Using backward elimination significant explanatory variables were determined. For litter decomposed in its site of origin we found the limit value to depend mainly on the initial concentration of Mn, with higher Mn concentrations resulting in higher accumulated mass loss. Thus, litter with higher Mn reached a higher limit value and left a smaller stable fraction. This is likely due to the fact that Mn is an essential component of ligninolytic enzymes important for degrading litter in the later stages of decomposition. Manganese has received little attention in decomposition studies to date. Given its significance in this synthesis, the role of Mn in influencing variation in the late stages of decomposition among ecosystems and among litters of other genera besides Pinus deserves further attention.

  • 2.
    Berg, Björn
    et al.
    Department of Forest Sciences, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland .
    Erhagen, Björn
    Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences, University of Umeå, Umeå, Sweden .
    Johansson, Maj-Britt
    University of Gävle.
    Nilsson, Mats
    Department of Forest Ecology and Management, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå.
    Stendahl, Johan
    Department of Soil and Environment, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala.
    Trum, Florence
    Earth and Life Institute, Universite' catolique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium .
    Vesterdal, Lars
    Department of Geosciences and Natural Resource Management, University of Copenhagen, Fredriksberg C, Denmark .
    Manganese in the litter fall-forest floor continuum of boreal and temperate pine and spruce forest ecosystems: a review2015In: Forest Ecology and Management, ISSN 0378-1127, E-ISSN 1872-7042, Vol. 358, p. 248-260, article id 15021Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have reviewed the literature on the role of manganese (Mn) in the litter fall-to-humus subsystem. Available data gives a focus on North European coniferous forests. Manganese concentrations in pine (Pinus spp.) foliar litter are highly variable both spatially and temporally within the same litter species and for the genus Pinus we found a range from 0.03 to 3.7mgg-1. Concentrations were related negatively to site mean annual temperature (MAT) and annual actual evapotranspiration (AET) for pine species litter but not for that of Norway spruce (Picea abies) as a single species. Combined data for several species showed a highly significant relationship to MAT.Manganese peroxidase is an Mn-dependent enzyme, found in white-rot fungi, essential for the degradation of lignin and ligninlike compounds. The decomposition rates of lignified litter tissue (late phase) is positively related to the litter’s Mn concentration. Further, the Mn concentration is positively related to the limit value for decomposition - the higher the Mn concentration the smaller the stable litter fraction. Manganese release from decomposing litter appears at least in part to be species related. Thus was release from pine needle litter significantly faster (p<. 0.001) than that from the Mn-richer litter of Norway spruce. Over Northern Europe concentrations of total Mn in mor humus as well as extractable Mn in the mineral soil increase with decreasing MAT and over a climatic gradient the Mn concentrations in Norway spruce mor increase more with decreasing MAT than in a gradient with Scots pine. Higher Mn concentrations in humus appear to decrease its stability and result in a higher release of carbon dioxide (CO<inf>2</inf>) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). We conclude that this may explain (i) the lower amount of carbon (C) in mor layers under Norway spruce as compared to Scots pine as well as the higher amount of C in mineral soil under spruce. The increase in nitrogen (N) concentration in humus, following N fertilization resulted in a decrease in that of Mn. We have found four cases - empirical - with negative interaction between Mn and N; (i) in pine foliar litter fall concentrations of Mn decrease with site MAT whereas those of N increase, (ii) in decomposing late-stage litter with N retarding and Mn stimulating decomposition, (iii) for the stable phase, limit values are related negatively to N and positively to Mn, and (iv) Mn concentrations in humus decrease with MAT whereas those of N increase.

  • 3.
    Berg, Björn
    et al.
    Department of Forest Ecology, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finlan; Dipartimento Biologia Strutturale e Funzionale, Complesso Universitario, Napoli, Italy.
    Johansson, Maj-Britt
    University of Gävle.
    Nilsson, Åke
    Department of Forest Soils, Swedish University of Agriculture, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Gundersen, Per
    Forest and Landscape Denmark, University of Copenhagen, HØrsholm, Denmark.
    Norell, Lennart
    Unit of Applied Statistics and Mathematics, Swedish University of Agrictulture, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Sequestration of carbon in the humus layer of Swedish forests - direct measurements2009In: Canadian Journal of Forest Research, ISSN 0045-5067, E-ISSN 1208-6037, Vol. 39, no 5, p. 962-975Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To determine sequestration rates of carbon dioxide (CO2) we calculated the carbon (C) storage rate in humus layers of Swedish forests with Podsolic soils, which account for 14.2 x 106 ha of the 22.7 x 106 ha of forested land in Sweden. Our data set covered 41 years of humus inventories and mean humus layer thickness in 82513 plots. We analysed three forest types: (i) all combinations of tree species, (ii) forests dominated (>70%) by Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.), and (Ui) forests dominated (>70%) by Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.). To relate changes in humus layer thickness to land area we used the intersections in 25 km x 25 km grids and used kriging interpolation, permitting calculations for each forest type. For each intersection mean humus thickness for each year was calculated and regressed against time to obtain the rate of change. This rate, humus bulk density, and humus C concentration were used, to calculate sequestration rates. The mean sequestration rate was 251 kg C-ha-1'year1, which is higher than theoretical values. The sequestration rate was positively related to temperature sum, albeit including effects of forest management. The pine-dominated forest type had a mean rate of 283 kgCha⁁year-1, and. the spruce-dominated had a mean rate of 239 kg Cha-1-year1. Under similar site conditions, pine sequestered more C than spruce (difference of 71 kg Cha-1'year-1; p < 0.0001), showing the importance of this type of ecosystem for C sequestration.

  • 4.
    Bringmark, Ewa
    et al.
    Department of Aquatic Sciences and Assessment, SLU, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Bringmark, Lage
    Department of Aquatic Sciences and Assessment, SLU, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Sonesten, Lars
    Department of Aquatic Sciences and Assessment, SLU, Uppsala, Sweden .
    Mjöfors, Kristina
    Department of Soil and Environment, SLU, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Johansson, Maj-Britt
    University of Gävle.
    Long-term monitoring of scots pine litter decomposition rates throughout sweden indicates formation of a more recalcitrant litter in the south2011In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 40, no 8, p. 878-890Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Decomposition studies were carried out at sites throughout Sweden, including the four Integrated Monitoring sites. Scots pine needle litterbag weight loss measurements over 3 or 5 years were determined at 26 sites and repeated up to 27 times, depending on the site. Humus layer respiration rates were determined for 20 sites in 1987-1989 and repeated in 2007-2008. Partial Least Squares (PLS) regression was used to elucidate the relative importance of climatic and soil factors. Annual needle weight losses decreased only slowly (20-10%) over 3-5 years for all northern (> 60A degrees N) sites but decreased sharply from 30 to 10% in the third year in southern (< 60A degrees N) sites. Respiration rates of southern sites were less (40% on average) than those of northern sites. Humus layer N was positively correlated to needle weight loss during the first and the second years, but negatively correlated in the third year and to respiration rates. The results indicated that litter formed in southern Sweden became more recalcitrant in later stages of decomposition compared to litter produced in northern Sweden.

  • 5.
    Djukic, Ika
    et al.
    Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research WSL, Birmensdorf, Zürich, Switzerland.
    Kepfer-Rojas, Sebastian
    Department of Geosciences and Natural Resource Management, University of Copenhagen, Frederiksberg, Denmark.
    Kappel Schmidt, Inger
    Department of Geosciences and Natural Resource Management, University of Copenhagen, Frederiksberg, Denmark.
    Steenberg Larsen, Klaus
    Department of Geosciences and Natural Resource Management, University of Copenhagen, Frederiksberg, Denmark.
    Beier, Claus
    Department of Geosciences and Natural Resource Management, University of Copenhagen, Frederiksberg, Denmark.
    Berg, Björn
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Biology. Department of Forest Sciences, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Verheyen, Kris
    Forest & Nature Lab, Department of Forest and Water Management, Ghent University, Gontrode, Belgium.
    Early stage litter decomposition across biomes2018In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 628-629, p. 1369-1394Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Through litter decomposition enormous amounts of carbon is emitted to the atmosphere. Numerous large-scale decomposition experiments have been conducted focusing on this fundamental soil process in order to understand the controls on the terrestrial carbon transfer to the atmosphere. However, previous studies were mostly based on site-specific litter and methodologies, adding major uncertainty to syntheses, comparisons and meta-analyses across different experiments and sites. In the TeaComposition initiative, the potential litter decomposition is investigated by using standardized substrates (Rooibos and Green tea) for comparison of litter mass loss at 336 sites (ranging from −9 to +26 °C MAT and from 60 to 3113 mm MAP) across different ecosystems. In this study we tested the effect of climate (temperature and moisture), litter type and land-use on early stage decomposition (3 months) across nine biomes. We show that litter quality was the predominant controlling factor in early stage litter decomposition, which explained about 65% of the variability in litter decomposition at a global scale. The effect of climate, on the other hand, was not litter specific and explained <0.5% of the variation for Green tea and 5% for Rooibos tea, and was of significance only under unfavorable decomposition conditions (i.e. xeric versus mesic environments). When the data were aggregated at the biome scale, climate played a significant role on decomposition of both litter types (explaining 64% of the variation for Green tea and 72% for Rooibos tea). No significant effect of land-use on early stage litter decomposition was noted within the temperate biome. Our results indicate that multiple drivers are affecting early stage litter mass loss with litter quality being dominant. In order to be able to quantify the relative importance of the different drivers over time, long-term studies combined with experimental trials are needed.

  • 6.
    Dong, Lili
    et al.
    Erguna Forest-Steppe Ecotone Research Station, Institute of Applied Ecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang, China.
    Sun, Tao
    Erguna Forest-Steppe Ecotone Research Station, Institute of Applied Ecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang, China.
    Berg, Björn
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electrical Engineering, Mathematics and Science, Biology. Department of Forest Sciences, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Zhang, Lili
    National Engineering Laboratory for Soil Nutrient Management, Institute of Applied Ecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang, China.
    Zhang, Quanquan
    School of International Education, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing, China.
    Wang, Zhengwen
    Erguna Forest-Steppe Ecotone Research Station, Institute of Applied Ecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang, China.
    Effects of different forms of N deposition on leaf litter decomposition and extracellular enzyme activities in a temperate grassland2019In: Soil Biology and Biochemistry, ISSN 0038-0717, E-ISSN 1879-3428, Vol. 134, p. 78-80Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the importance of decomposition for biogeochemical cycles, it is still not clear how this process is affected by different forms of nitrogen (N). Equal amounts of N with different ratios of inorganic N: organic N (0 : 0, 10 : 0, 7 : 3, 5 : 5, 3 : 7, and 0 : 10) were added to the soil in a steppe. We studied the response of litter decomposition to different forms of N enrichment. The treatment with 30% organic N resulted in the fastest decomposition, which was higher than with inorganic N or organic N addition alone. Our results highlight the need for studies of N deposition on carbon cycles that consider different components in N deposition.

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