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  • 1.
    Essner, Ann
    et al.
    Department of Neuroscience, Faculty of Physiotherapy, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Evidensia Djurkliniken Gefle, Gävle, Sweden.
    Zetterberg, Lena
    Department of Neuroscience, Faculty of Physiotherapy, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Hellström, Karin
    Department of Neuroscience, Faculty of Physiotherapy, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Gustås, Pia
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Husbandry, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Högberg, Hans
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science.
    Sjöström, Rita
    Unit of Research Education and Development, Region Jämtland Härjedalen, Östersund, Sweden; Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Faculty of Physiotherapy, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Psychometric evaluation of the canine brief pain inventory in a Swedish sample of dogs with pain related to osteoarthritis2017In: Acta Veterinaria Scandinavica, ISSN 1751-0147, E-ISSN 1751-0147, Vol. 59, no 1, article id 44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: To evaluate intervention, implement evidence-based practice and enhance the welfare of dogs with naturally occurring osteoarthritis (OA), access to valid, reliable and clinically relevant outcome measures is crucial for researchers, veterinarians and rehabilitation practitioners. The objectives of the present study were to translate and evaluate psychometric properties, in terms of internal consistency and construct validity, of the owner-reported measure canine brief pain inventory (CBPI) in a Swedish sample of dogs with pain related to OA.

    RESULTS: Twenty-one owners of clinically sound dogs and 58 owners of dogs with pain related to OA were included in this observational and cross-sectional study. After being translated according to the guidelines for patient-reported outcome measures, the CBPI was completed by the canine owners. Construct validity was assessed by confirmatory factor analysis, by repeating the principal component analysis and by assessing for differences between clinically sound dogs and dogs with pain related to OA. Internal consistency was estimated by Cronbach's α. Confirmatory factor analysis was not able to confirm the factor-structure models tested in our sample. Principal component analysis showed a two-component structure, pain severity and pain interference of function. Two components accounted for 76.8% of the total variance, suggesting an acceptable fit of a two-component structure. The ratings from the clinically sound dogs differed from OA dogs and showed significantly lower CBPI total sum. Cronbach's α was 0.94 for the total CBPI, 0.91 for the pain severity and 0.91 for the pain interference of function.

    CONCLUSIONS: The results indicate that the translated version of the CBPI is valid for use in the Swedish language. The findings suggest satisfying psychometric properties in terms of high internal consistencies and ability to discriminate clinically sound dogs from OA dogs. However, based on the confirmatory factor analysis, the original factor structure in the CBPI is not ideally suited to measure pain related to OA in our sample and the hypothesis of the presented two-factor structure was rejected. Further research needs to be conducted to determine whether the original psychometric results from CBPI can be replicated across different target groups and particularly with larger sample size.

  • 2.
    Essner, Ann
    et al.
    Department of Neuroscience, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Evidensia Djurkliniken Gefle, Gävle, Sweden.
    Zetterberg, Lena
    Evidensia Djurkliniken Gefle, Gävle, Sweden.
    Hellström, Karin
    Evidensia Djurkliniken Gefle, Gävle, Sweden.
    Gustås, Pia
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Högberg, Hans
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science.
    Sjöström, Rita
    Region Jämtland Härjedalen, Unit of Research Education & Development, Östersund, Sweden.
    Validation of a translated version of the Canine Brief Pain Inventory for the measure of pain severity and functional movements in canine osteoarthritis2016In: Journal of Small Animal Practice, ISSN 0022-4510, E-ISSN 1748-5827, Vol. 57, no Suppl. 2, p. 8-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reasons for performing study: The Canine Brief Pain Inventory (CBPI) is a caregiver-reported questionnaire designed to assess pain severity and the impact of pain on activities, such as functional movements, in canine osteoarthritis (OA). The English version of CBPI has displayed satisfactory psychometric properties, in canine OA. To be used in another language the CBPI has to be properly translated and tested.

    Objectives: To report some psychometric properties of a translated version of the CBPI (CBPI-S), in a group of dogs diagnosed with OA.

    Study design: Observational, cross-sectional.

    Methods: Twenty-one caregivers of clinically sound dogs and 61 caregivers of dogs with OA were prospectively included in this study. After being translated, according to recommendations for patient-reported outcome measures, the CBPI-S was completed by the caregivers. Construct validity (the ability to measure what it is supposed to measure) was assessed by repeating the principal component analysis and by assessing for differences between sound dogs and dogs with OA using Mann–Whitney U test. Internal consistency (the correlation among items) was estimated by Cronbach's α.

    Results: Principal component analysis showed a two-component structure (pain severity and impact of pain). Two components accounted for 76 · 8% of the total variance, suggesting an acceptable fit of a two-component structure. Inter-item correlations were good (overall > 0 · 39) and mean inter-item correlation was 0 · 79 for severity items and 0 · 62 for impact items. Clinically sound dogs differed from OA dogs and showed significantly lower CBPI-S total score. Cronbach's α was 0 · 94 for the total CBPI-S, 0 · 91 for the pain severity and 0 · 91 for the impact of pain.

    Conclusion: Our results supplement the knowledge with the CBPI by verifying the easy to use utility. Also, by repeating satisfying construct validity and high internal consistency of CBPI-S our results indicate that the translated version seems valid for use in another language.

    Ethical animal research: The study was approved by the Local Animal Ethics Committee in Uppsala. Informed client consent was obtained for all animals used in the study.

    Sources of funding: This study was funded by Evidensia Djursjukvård, Svelands Stiftelse, Jan Skogsborgs Stiftelse and Agria & Svenska Kennelklubbens Forskningsfond.

  • 3.
    Westergren, Jens
    University of Gävle, Department of Caring Sciences and Sociology.
    Sodium bicarbonate ingestion increases pH in blood but does not attenuate exercise induced arterial hypoxemia or enhance performance2008Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Magister), 20 points / 30 hpStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: The exact causes of Exercise Induced Arterial Hypoxemia (EIAH) are not yet known. Earlier studies on the ergogenic effects of NaHCO3 have neglected to investigate the occurrence of EIAH among their subject, something that could explain the conflicting results, EIAH cannot be over looked since reportedly 50% of well trained athletes experience EIAH. One possible ergogenic effect of NaHCO3 would be to attenuate EIAH through an increase in blood pH in a subject. This has been shown previously by means of intravenous infusion during maximal rowing.

    Aim: The aim of the study was to examine the effect of oral intake of NaHCO3 on EIAH and performance in trained cyclists.

    Method: Seven male cyclists (age 23.7 (22-27) years, VO2peak 64 (60-72) ml min-1 (kg body mass) -1 volunteered for the study. The subjects performed two maximal exercise tests to exhaustion 48 hours apart in a counter balanced cross over double blind fashion. Subjects received 0.3 g kg BW-1 CaCO3 and 0.3 g kg BW-1 NaHCO3 in the placebo and bicarbonate trial respectively.

    Free flowing arterialized capillary blood was sampled at rest and exhaustion and analyzed for pH, O2 Saturation, pO2, pCO2, and blood lactate. Ventilatory variables were measured continuously throughout the test V'O2, V’CO2, V'E, V'E/VO2, RER and HR. In addition pulse oximetry was used to evaluate O2 saturation.

    Results/Discussion: At rest pH and PCO2 was elevated (p<0.05) in the bicarbonate trial compared to the placebo trial. At exhaustion in the bicarbonate trial pH, blood lactate, RER, was significantly elevated (p<0.05) when compared to the placebo trial. O2 saturation from blood samples at exhaustion in the bicarbonate trial showed a trend towards improving (p=0.061). No difference was seen between the two trials in PO2, VO2peak, V'Emax, HRmax or performance. During exercise, bicarbonate ingestion increased blood pH but did not improve arterial saturation or performance. The increase in blood pH achieved by ingestion of bicarbonate was not as large as the increase achieved by intravenous infusion in another study. Even with the larger increase in blood pH in those studies, there was only a small improvement in performance. One possible explanation for the performance improvement with bicarbonate infusion in that study was a reduced ventilation that could effect respiratory muscle work and thereby work capacity. The bicarbonate ingestion in the present study did not reduce ventilation. This could possible be achieved with higher doses of NaHCO3, which would most likely result in increased frequency of gastrointestinal distress among subjects.

  • 4.
    Wigert, Annsofi
    University of Gävle, Department of Caring Sciences and Sociology.
    Har syrgaskoncentrationen någon inverkan på lungfunktionen vid endotrakeal sugning och lungrekrytering?: En experimentell studie på gris2008Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Magister), 20 points / 30 hpStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION

    One of the most common routines in mechanically ventilated patients is endotracheal suction,

    (ETS). To avoid desaturation connected to this routine, it is common to increase oxygen

    concentration for a few minutes. High fractions of oxygen can be damaging, and it causes

    athelectasis which impairs gas exchange in the lung. A physiological respond due to the

    athelectasis is redirecting the bloodstream from poorly ventilated lungparts which leads to an

    increased pulmonary pressure. The aim of this study was to investigate if preoxygenation and

    lung recruitment with different oxygen concentrations influences hemodynamics, lung mechanics

    and lung volume.

    METHOD

    In six anaesthetised pigs with assisted mechanical ventilation preoxygenation was given with

    100 % or 60 % O2 for 5 minutes and followed by suction in the endotracheal tube. Thereafter, in

    3 out of 4 protocols a deep sigh was delivered with 21 %, 60 % or 100 % O2 at a pressure 15

    cmH2O above plateau pressure. Hemodynamics and lung mechanics were measured. For control

    in the studie no lungrecruitment was performed in one of the protocols.

    RESULTS

    Mean pulmonary pressure was induced in the protocol where there was no regain of lung volume

    after suction, 29±3 mmHg compared to bas line value of 22±2 mmHg (p<0.05). There was a clear

    difference in lung compliance, whether the lung volume was recruited, 22±1 (100 % O2), 21±3

    (21% O2), 21±3 (60 % O2) or not recruited, (13±1 mL cmH2O) after suction (p<0.001). The same

    were seen for changes in VT (p<0.001) and EELV (p<0.05).

    CONCLUSION

    The oxygen concentration when performing endotracheal suctioning is in this experimental

    model of no influence regarding hemodynamics, lung mechanics- or lung volumes, provided

    recruitment of the lung is done directly after suctioning.

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