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  • 1. Barthel, Stephan
    et al.
    Colding, Johan
    Erixon, Hanna
    Ernstson, Henrik
    KTH, Historiska studier av teknik, vetenskap och miljö.
    Grahn, Sara
    Kärsten, Carl
    Marcus, Lars
    Torsvall, Jonas
    Principles of Social Ecological Design: Case study Albano Campus, Stockholm2013Book (Other academic)
  • 2. Barthel, Stephan
    et al.
    Colding, Johan
    Ernstson, Henrik
    KTH, Historiska studier av teknik, vetenskap och miljö.
    Grahn, Sara
    KTH, Arkitektur.
    Erixon, Hanna
    KTH, Arkitektur.
    Marcus, Lars
    KTH, Stadsbyggnad.
    Kärsten, Carl
    Torsvall, Jonas
    Chans sätta Stockholm på kartan2011In: Svenska dagbladetArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 3. Glaumann, Mauritz
    et al.
    Westerberg, Ulla
    Närklimat kring stora hus2018In: Hus mot himlen – hållbar hybris? / [ed] Olshammar, G., Olsson, K. & Siesjö, B., Malmö: Bokförlaget Arena , 2018, p. 200-221Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 4.
    Jiang, Bin
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Land management, GIS.
    A city is a complex network2015In: A City is Not a Tree: 50th Anniversary Edition / [ed] Michael W. Mehaffy, Portland, OR: Sustasis Press , 2015, 1, p. 89-100Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A city is not a tree but a semilattice. To use a perhaps more familiar term, a city is a complex network. The complex network constitutes a unique topological perspective on cities and enables us to better understand the kind of problem a city is. The topological perspective differentiates it from the perspectives of Euclidean geometry and Gaussian statistics that deal with essentially regular shapes and more or less similar things. Many urban theories, such as the Central Place Theory, Zipf's Law, the Image of the City, and the Theory of Centers can be interpreted from the point of view of complex networks. A livable city consists of far more small things than large ones, and their shapes tend to be irregular and rough. This chapter illustrates the complex network view and argues that we must abandon the kind of thinking (mis-)guided by Euclidean geometry and Gaussian statistics, and instead adopt fractal geometry, power-law statistics, and Alexander's living geometry to develop sustainable cities.

  • 5.
    Marcus, Lars
    et al.
    KTH, Stadsbyggnad.
    Barthel, Stephan
    Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Colding, Johan
    Royal Swedish Academy of the Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Erixon, Hanna
    KTH, Kritiska studier i arkitektur.
    Ernstson, Henrik
    Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Grahn, Sara
    KTH, Arkitekturteknik.
    Torsvall, Jonas
    KIT - Arkitektur.
    Kärsten, Carl
    KIT - Arkitektur.
    Q-book Albano 4: Sustainability2010Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This report is the result of a collaboration between The Stockholm Resilience Centre at Stockholm University, The School of Architecture at the Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm and the Architectural firm KIT also based in Stockholm. It explores and discusses strategies for integrating novel social-ecological research within the planning and urban design practices aiming to delineate principles for an integrated and comprehensive social-ecological urban design practice. As focal case and example works the Albano campus area in Stockholm, with a strategic location at the crossroads between the three major universities in Stockholm as well as its inner city and the National City Park, the latter adressing the contested issue of expanding the university and city inside a large urban park of national interest. Taken together this critical location in a most informative way highlights several of the potentials and challenges that the contemporary planning and urban design fields are facing today.

    Q-book Albano 4 originated from the work by a inter- and transdisciplinary research team, in their effort to challenge existing development plans for the expansion of the Stockholm University campus over an area inside the National Urban Park. While the existing plans lacked a clear engagement with novel findings from research and design theory, and while the campus expansion was to be placed within a park with important biodiversity and cultural heritage, the team took upon them to articulate an alternative vision based on contemporary international and local research. Consequently, the team offered an alternative vision for the area, in contrast to the plans that the City had been offered by other architects and planners.

    Furthermore, through presenting this vision at an international academic conference open to the public, the real-estate developer Akademiska hus, a body within the Swedish state that manages university campuses across the country, making them one of the largest developers of their kind in the world, showed an interest and urged the team to develop their suggestion further. Through this support, time was given to deepen the principles of social-ecological urban design and to further develop the alternative vision for how the Albano area could be developed according to these principles. This included workshops with experts, and stakeholder meetings with civil society organizations.

    The alternative vision, in this process developed into this illustrated report that effectively joins theories of resilience, social-ecological systems and ecosystem services with theories of spatial analysis, urban morphology and design methodology, translating this new body of knowledge into principles and elements of social-ecological urban design, using the Albano site as case study.

     

  • 6.
    Marcus, Lars
    et al.
    School of Architecture, The Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Colding, Johan
    Royal Swedish Academy of the Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden; The Beijer Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Towards a Spatial Morphology of Urban Social-Ecological Systems2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The discussion on sustainable urban development is ubiquitous these days. Concerning the more specific field of urban design and urban morphology we can identify a movement from a first generation of research and practice, primarily addressing climate change, and a second generation, broadening the field to also encompass biodiversity. The two have quite different implications for urban design and urban morphology. The first, stressing the integration of more advanced technological systems to the urban fabric, such as energy and waste disposal systems, but more conspicuously, public and private transport systems, often leading to rather conventional design solutions albeit technologically enhanced.

    The second generation ask for a more direct involvement of urban form, asking the question: how are future urban designs going to harbor not only social and economic systems, which they have always done, but ecological as well, that is, how are we in research on urban form, as support for future practice in urban design, develop knowledge that bridges the ancient dichotomy between human and ecological systems. This paper presents, firstly, a conceptual discussion on this topic, based in Resilience Theory and Urban Morphology, secondly, the layout of a principal research field towards a spatial morphology of urban social-ecological systems, where strategic research tasks are identified.

  • 7.
    Wallhagen, Marita
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Environmental engineering. Department of Sustainable Development, Environmental Science and Engineering, KTH, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Magnusson, Peter
    Centre for Research and Development, Uppsala University/Region Gävleborg, Gävle, Sweden; Cardiology Research Unit, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ecological worldview among urban design professionals2017In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 9, no 4, article id 498Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The built environment is responsible for a large proportion of the global use of energy, natural resources, and emissions. Architects and other urban design professionals are key actors in the building process whose behavior and decisions will influence these impacts. Because environmental attitudes are linked to pro-environmental behavior, this study aims to measure environmental worldview among urban design professionals involved in the architectural competition ‘A New City Center for Kiruna’. The mean score registered for the New Environmental Paradigm (NEP) scale was 3.68 (standard deviation 0.51) and there were no significant differences with regard to age (mean 41.3 years) or gender (64.7% males). The ecological worldview of the participants was similar to most other samples from diverse countries, but a lower score was reported in comparison to environmentalists. The score ranged from 2.53 to 4.67 which shows heterogeneity at an individual level. Thus, future efforts to improve environmental attitudes among urban design professionals are needed.

  • 8.
    Wallhagen, Marita
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Environmental engineering. Division of Environmental Strategies Research, School of Architecture and the Built Environment, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Malmqvist, Tove
    Division of Environmental Strategies Research, School of Architecture and the Built Environment, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Ola
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Environmental engineering.
    Professionals' knowledge and use of environmental assessment in an architectural competition2017In: Building Research & Information, ISSN 0961-3218, E-ISSN 1466-4321, Vol. 45, no 4, p. 426-442Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In early design phases, architects, landscape architects and urban planners are key actors whose decisions determine the environmental impact of planning and building projects. Environmental and sustainability assessment tools for buildings and neighbourhoods have been developed to promote sustainable building, but their usage has not been thoroughly evaluated. This study investigated self-reported knowledge and usage of such tools among competitors and jury group from 10 European countries involved in the international architectural competition '€˜A New City Centre for Kiruna'€™ in Sweden. The questionnaire revealed that 13% used environmental assessment tools or management systems in the competition, although 47% had used them previously. Tool users reported greater knowledge of how to handle environmental impacts than non-users. However, the self-rated experience of handling various environmental impacts, in the competition and in general, was low for both groups. Nevertheless, the self-rated importance of environmental impacts was high among all participants. Based on this study, it is concluded that environmental assessment tools, issues and goals can be better integrated into the processes of early design in planning and building projects, and in architectural competitions. Furthermore, to limit environmental impacts in building and planning projects, professionals need to be educated about environmental strategies and solutions.

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