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  • 1.
    Laukka, Petri
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Juslin, Patrik N.
    Department of Psychology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Similar patterns of age-related differences in emotion recognition from speech and music2007In: Motivation and Emotion, ISSN 0146-7239, E-ISSN 1573-6644, Vol. 31, no 3, p. 182-191Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ability of young and old adults to recognize emotions from vocal expressions and music performances was compared. The stimuli consisted of a) acted speech (anger, disgust, fear, happiness, and sadness; each posed with both weak and strong emotion intensity), b) synthesized speech (anger, fear, happiness, and sadness), and c) short melodies played on the electric guitar (anger, fear, happiness, and sadness; each played with both weak and strong emotion intensity). Both groups of listeners rated the stimuli using forced-choice and also rated the emotion intensity of each stimulus. Results showed emotion-specific age-related differences in recognition accuracy. Old adults consistently received significantly lower recognition accuracy for negative, but not for positive, emotions across all types of stimuli. Age-related differences in recognition of emotion intensity were also found. The results show the importance of considering individual emotions in studies on age-related differences in emotion recognition.

  • 2.
    Montgomery, William
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Psychology.
    Montgomery, Henry
    Stockholms universitet; Uppsala universitet.
    Gärling, Tommy
    Göteborgs universitet.
    How situational activation of values evokes positive and negative feelings: Theory and experimental findings2020In: Motivation and Emotion, ISSN 0146-7239, E-ISSN 1573-6644Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We propose a theory of how situational activation of values evokes positive and negative feelings. In conjunction we present a re-conceptualization of Schwartz’ et al. (J Personal Soc Psychol 103:663–688, 2012. https://doi.org/10.1037/a029393) value set including additional values. In our new value set, we posit contrastive values having opposite values and central values having no opposite values. As a consequence, balanced access to salient opposite contrastive values and maximal access to central values evoke the strongest positive and weakest negative feelings. Study 1 shows, as hypothesized, that contrastive values form a circumplex structure with central values located inside its periphery. Study 2 supports theoretically derived hypotheses of how positive and negative feelings are evoked by different degrees of access to values, salience of opposite values, and centrality of values.

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  • Other style
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