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  • 1.
    Albertzeth, Gustav
    et al.
    Department of Industrial Engineering, Institut Teknologi Sepuluh Nopember, Surabaya, Indonesia.
    Pujawan, I. Nyoman
    Department of Industrial Engineering, Institut Teknologi Sepuluh Nopember, Surabaya, Indonesia.
    Hilletofth, Per
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. Department of Industrial Engineering and Management, School of Engineering, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Tjahjono, Benny
    Centre for Business in Society, Coventry University, Coventry, United Kingdom.
    Mitigating transportation disruptions in a supply chain: a cost-effective strategy2019In: International Journal of Logistics, ISSN 1367-5567, E-ISSN 1469-848XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transportation disruptions can be damaging to a supply chain because goods may not arrive on time and this jeopardises the service level to the customers. While supply chain disruptions have gained significant attention from scholars, little has been done to explore these disruptions in the context of transportation. The study described in this paper aims to address disruptions occurring in the transportation of goods from a plant to a distribution centre. We modelled this real case to obtain insights on the effectiveness of different strategies to mitigate transportation disruptions. We evaluated four mitigation strategies and compared the outcomes in terms of service level and total costs: (1) the risk acceptance strategy, (2) the redundant stock strategy, (3) the flexible route strategy, and (4) the redundant-flexibility strategy. The results suggest that the best strategy differs depending on the budget that managers are willing to deploy to improve the service level. The simulation experiments and the use of the Incremental Cost Effectiveness Ratio (ICER) would be instrumental in helping decision makers in selecting the best disruption mitigation strategies where the best option would likely be different under varying circumstances. 

  • 2.
    Jazairy, Amer
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Lenhardt, Johannes
    von Haartman, Robin
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Improving logistics performance in cross-border 3PL relationships2017In: International Journal of Logistics, ISSN 1367-5567, E-ISSN 1469-848X, Vol. 20, no 5, p. 491-513Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper proposes guidelines for improving logistics performance in terms of cost efficiency and on-time delivery in shipper–third-party logistics (3PL) provider relationships within an offshore outsourcing context. A conceptual framework is constructed based on a thorough literature review. Empirical data are collected through semi-structured interviews in a single-case study with a dyadic perspective, examining the 3PL relationship between Ericsson of Sweden and Aramex of Saudi Arabia. Accordingly, a revised framework is proposed after illustrating the case and merging the literature with practice. The findings highlight the impact of communication, trust, culture, system compliance, work agreements, and standardisation on cost efficiency and on-time delivery performance. The developed framework illustrates a sequential order for working on these factors to achieve performance improvement. This research is one of the first to propose guidelines for performance improvements within offshore outsourcing of 3PL services. 

  • 3.
    Jazairy, Amer
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    von Haartman, Robin
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Analysing the institutional pressures on shippers and logistics service providers to implement green supply chain management practices2020In: International Journal of Logistics, ISSN 1367-5567, E-ISSN 1469-848X, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 44-84Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper applies institutional theory to analyse the institutional pressures (regulatory, market, competitive) experienced by two actors within supply chains: shippers (i.e. logistics buyers) and logistics service providers (LSPs). Both actors are subject to institutional pressures to adopt green supply chain management practices, which could drive shippers to purchase green logistics services from LSPs, and LSPs to provide them. Also, the two actors are influenced by various factors that moderate the level of pressures on them and the responses they undertake. This study examines these pressures and moderators in detail to analyse how they influence green logistics purchasing/providing decisions. Empirical data were obtained from eight individual cases of three shippers and five LSPs. Accordingly, we compare these pressures and moderators based on the actors’ different roles in the supply chain. The findings aim to contribute to advancing the theory through (i) incorporating the roles of the moderating factors and (ii) providing further applications within specific shipper-LSP contexts. Further, this paper aims to assist managers within shipper and LSP organisations by demonstrating how their firm and market characteristics moderate the pressures exerted on them to buy or provide green logistics services, while providing insights on issues influencing their responsiveness.

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