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  • 1.
    Dabhilkar, Mandar
    et al.
    Stockholm Business School, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bengtsson, Lars
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Lakemond, Nicolette
    Department of Management and Engeering, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Sustainable supply management as a purchasing capability: a power and dependence perspective2016In: International Journal of Operations & Production Management, ISSN 0144-3577, E-ISSN 1758-6593, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 2-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to use the relative power and total interdependence concepts as an intervening theoretical lens to explain why and how sustainable supply management (SSM) initiatives by manufacturing firms differ across the Kraljic matrix according to purchasing capability.

    Design/methodology/approach – Tested hypotheses by subjecting survey data from 338 manufacturers on buyer-supplier relationships in Europe and North America to regression analysis.

    Findings – Shows three situations where relative power and total interdependence determine the effectiveness of purchasing capabilities. First, sustainability programs impact supplier compliance in all Kraljic categories but bottleneck items. Second, there are significant trade-offs between lower cost and higher social and environmental supplier compliance for noncritical components. Third, strategic alignment of sustainability objectives between corporate and supply function levels only leads to improved financial performance for strategic components.

    Research limitations/implications – Further research could take power and dependence into account to explain when and how purchasing capabilities focussed on sustainability can be achieved.

    Practical implications – Shows how supply strategists could devise-tailored approaches for different purchasing categories with respect to power and dependence when pursuing economic, social and environmental objectives in combination – the triple bottom line – along their supply chains.

    Originality/value – Illustrates and provides a theoretical explanation for why SSM is a purchasing capability that must vary across purchasing categories defined by different situations of power and dependence.

  • 2.
    Neumann, W. P.
    et al.
    National Institute for Working Life, Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Design Sciences, Lund Technical University, Lund, Sweden; Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Ryerson University, Toronto, Canada.
    Winkel, J.
    National Institute for Working Life, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Medbo, L.
    Department of Transport and Logisitics, Chalmers Technical University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Magneberg, R.
    National Institute for Working Life, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Production system design elements influencing productivity and ergonomics: a case study of parallel and serial flow strategies2006In: International Journal of Operations & Production Management, ISSN 0144-3577, E-ISSN 1758-6593, Vol. 26, no 8, p. 904-923Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: A strategic change from parallel-cell based assembly (OLD) to serial-line assembly (NEW) was investigated in a Swedish company with special reference to how production system design elements affect both productivity and ergonomics.

    Methods: Multiple methods, including records and video analysis, questionnaires, interviews, biomechanical modelling, and flow simulation were applied.

    Findings: The NEW system, unlike the OLD, showed the emergence of system and balance losses as well as vulnerability to disturbances and difficulty handling all product variants. Nevertheless the NEW system as realised partially overcame productivity barriers in the operation and management of the OLD system. The NEW system had impaired ergonomics due to decreased physical variation and increased repetitiveness with cycle times that were 6% of previous thus increasing repetitiveness, and significantly reduced perceived influence over work. Workstations’ uneven exposure to physical tasks such as nut running created a potential problem for workload management. The adoption of teamwork in the NEW system contributed to significantly increased co-worker support – an ergonomic benefit.

    Implications: Design decisions made early in the development process affect both ergonomics and productivity in the resulting system. While the time pattern of 3 physical loading appeared to be controlled by flow and work organisation elements, the amplitude of loading was determined more by workstation layout. Psychosocial conditions appear to be affected by a combination of system elements including layout, flow, and work organisation elements.

    Practical Implications: Strategic use of parallelisation elements in assembly, perhaps in hybrid forms from configurations observed here, appears to be a viable design option for improved performance by reducing the fragility and ergonomic problems of assembly lines.

    Value: The interacting design elements examined here pose potential ‘levers’ of control by which productivity and ergonomics could be jointly optimised for improved total system performance.

  • 3.
    von Haartman, Robin
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Bengtsson, Lars
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    The impact of global purchasing and supplier integration on product innovation2015In: International Journal of Operations & Production Management, ISSN 0144-3577, E-ISSN 1758-6593, Vol. 35, no 9, p. 1295-1311Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The interest in global purchasing has increased significantly in recent years, but the impact on product innovation is not well understood. The purpose of this paper is to empirically analyse the impact of global purchasing on product innovation sourced from suppliers, while taking into account how firms integrate their suppliers.

    Design/methodology/approach – The data used in this study are from the International Purchasing Survey, an international online survey on purchasing and supply management conducted in 2009. The data are analysed using factor and regression analyses.

    Findings – The paper shows that global purchasing has no direct impact on product innovation performance. However, supplier integration is more strongly associated with product innovation performance for firms purchasing globally compared to firms purchasing regionally.

    Practical implications – The implication is that when companies purchase globally, they must have a highly developed purchasing department in order to sustain a high level of innovation. For firms purchasing only regionally, the role of the purchasing department is diminished, at least in terms of contributing to innovation.

    Originality/value – This paper contributes to the discussion of potential advantages and disadvantages of global purchasing. First, the paper provides an explanation for the ambiguous results of previous research. Product innovation does not depend on whether firms are purchasing globally or not, it depends on how they purchase. This paper has showed that when purchasing globally, the role of the purchasing department becomes crucial for product innovation. The proficiency and activities of the purchasing department largely determine the success, in terms of supplier product innovation, of global purchasing.

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