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  • 1.
    Patrizio, Piera
    et al.
    Ecosystems Services and Management Program (ESM), International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA) School of Business Society and Engineering, Mälardalen University.
    Leduc, Sylvain
    Ecosystems Services and Management Program (ESM), International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA).
    Kraxner, Florian
    Ecosystems Services and Management Program (ESM), International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA).
    Fuss, Sabine
    Ecosystems Services and Management Program (ESM), International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA); Working Group Sustainable Resource Management and Global Change, Mercator Research Institute on Global Commons and Climate Change.
    Kindermann, Georg
    Ecosystems Services and Management Program (ESM), International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA).
    Mesfun, Sennai
    Ecosystems Services and Management Program (ESM), International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA).
    Spokas, Kasparas
    Ecosystems Services and Management Program (ESM), International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA); Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Princeton University.
    Mendoza, Alma
    Ecosystems Services and Management Program (ESM), International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA).
    Mac Dowell, Niall
    Centre for Environmental Policy, Imperial College London; Centre for Process Systems Engineering, Imperial College London.
    Wetterlund, Elisabeth
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Energivetenskap.
    Lundgren, Joakim
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Energivetenskap.
    Dotzauer, Erik
    School of Business Society and Engineering, Mälardalen University.
    Yowargana, Ping
    Ecosystems Services and Management Program (ESM), International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA).
    Obersteiner, Michael
    Ecosystems Services and Management Program (ESM), International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA).
    Reducing US Coal Emissions Can Boost Employment2018In: Joule, E-ISSN 2542-4351, Vol. 2, no 12, p. 2633-2648Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Concerns have been voiced that implementing climate change mitigation measures could come at the cost of employment, especially in the context of the US coal sector. However, repurposing US coal plants presents an opportunity to address emission mitigation and job creation, if the right technology change is adopted. In this study, the transformation of the US coal sector until 2050 is modeled to achieve ambitious climate targets. Results show that the cost-optimal strategy for meeting 2050 emission reductions consistent with 2°C stabilization pathways is through the early deployment of BECCS and by replacing 50% of aging coal plants with natural gas plants. This strategy addresses the concerns surrounding employment for coal workers by retaining 40,000 jobs, and creating 22,000 additional jobs by mid-century. Climate change mitigation does not have to come at the cost of employment, and policymakers could seek to take advantage of the social co-benefits of mitigation.

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