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  • 1.
    Francia, Guadalupe
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Childrens’ right to equitable education: A welfare state’s goal in times of Neoliberalism2011In: Education Inquiry, ISSN 2000-4508, E-ISSN 2000-4508, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 401-419Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article employs Social Representations Theory as a theoretical instrument to analyse the right of children to an equitable education. It analyses how social representations of students and students’ performances can be used by political actors as an interpretation system to manage contradictions in the equity education policies implemented in Sweden. A textual analysis of website propaganda of eight political parties produced for the Swedish electoral campaign in 2010 is used as research methodology. It is suggested that social representations of students and student performance in the Swedish 2010 electoral campaign function as an interpretation system that enables political parties to deal with the contradiction between the goal of equitable education for all children and the goal of developing diversity and free choice. The absence of a critical perspective about the negative impacts of market-oriented strategies on children’s right to equity characterised the analysed texts. Further, the dominance of representations of students as individuals with a right to an individualised education according to their own capacities, interests, learning times and styles makes it difficult to critically question the neoliberal model based on the vision of "one school for each student".

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  • 2.
    Haglund, Björn
    Gothenburg University, Department of Education, Communication and Learning.
    Everyday practice at the Sunflower: the staff’s representations and governing strategies as contributions to the order of discourse2015In: Education Inquiry, ISSN 2000-4508, E-ISSN 2000-4508, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 209-229Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Swedish leisure-time centres were formerly part of Swedish social and family policies but were transferred to an educational context in the 1990s. This transfer was accentuated by both the Education Act of 2010 and the new teacher training established in 2011, which also included education particularly directed for leisure-time centres. The state’s intention with this discursive shift was to highlight education and learning within the activity in a more distinct way. This article is based on an ethnography-inspired study at one leisure-time centre called the Sunflower. The data are based on six weeks of field work including participating observations, field notes and walk-andtalk conversations. The study takes its point of departure from representations by staff concerning what they emphasise regarding the centre’s activity, how these representations are related to each other and which strategies staff members use when talking about and monitoring the pupils’ activities. The results show the strong presence of older traditions concerning values and practices regarding the performance at work: supporting children with good care, stressing the importance of children’s free play and using a peripheral subject position during work. The results also show that a stress on the child-to-staff ratio as circumscribing the activity which is enhanced by the pupils misallocated age distribution

  • 3.
    Wermke, Wieland
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Culture Studies, Religious Studies and Educational Sciences, Education. Uppsala universitet.
    Höstfält, Gabriella
    Stockholms universitet.
    Silent and explicit borrowing of international policy discourses: the case of the Swedish teacher education reforms of 2001 and 20112014In: Education Inquiry, ISSN 2000-4508, E-ISSN 2000-4508, Vol. 5, no 4, p. 445-460, article id 23417Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article presents different models of comparative education by discussing the government committee reports (SOU) which prepared the Swedish teacher education reforms of 2001 and 2011. These serve as examples for different kinds of policy borrowing from an international Bologna process discourse in national government document. The article facilitates Waldow (2009) term of “silent borrowing”. The reform of 2001 shows distinct references to international discourses without making this explicit. The reform of 2011 is then an example for explicit borrowing. The related government committee report refers very obvious to the Bologna process. However, this is seen as strategy in order to mark its distinction to its predecessor reform. Our cases are assumed to show how socio-historical and political contexts condition national discourses’ resources of legitimation.

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