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  • 1.
    Alsaid, Loai Ali Zeenalabden Ali
    et al.
    School of Economics, Finance and Accounting, Faculty of Business and Law, Coventry University, Coventry CV1 5FB, UK;Accounting Department, Faculty of Commerce, Beni-Suef University, Egypt.
    Mutiganda, Jean Claude
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Business and Economic Studies, Business administration. School of Business and Economics, Åbo Akademi University, FI-20500 Turku, Finland.
    ABC as a Multi-Lens Sustainability Reporting System in Smart Cities2023In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 15, no 12, article id 9357Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a very short list of theoretical and empirical studies on the role of management accounting tools in the sustainability of smart cities. While the majority of these studies have addressed this role from the perspective of openness, participation, and hybridisation, others have addressed it in terms of economic, social, and environmental sustainability. Despite their early efforts often focusing on institutionalisation and governmentality processes, their analyses did not address how management accounting tools can be used to achieve sustainable goals, particularly in developing countries with a political and cultural character. This study aims to explore how an activity-based costing/ABC system is configured within urban development organisations to internalise cultural and political sustainability values at the smart city level. It applies a politico-cultural model and uses a case study approach from an Egyptian state-owned smart city enterprise. The findings reveal smart city culture and political/government compliance in the implementation of the ABC system, enabled by enterprise resource planning/ERP technology, within state-owned enterprises/SOEs. This system, seen as an emerging field, was created as a multi-lens reporting system on their political and cultural sustainability in smart cities. While political sustainability refers to SOEs' compliance with the ABC system, cultural sustainability refers to the embodiment of national smart city values in their system implementation. This sustainability costing system of a political and cultural nature has also created recursive dynamics, exemplified by the powerful role of ERP-ABC reports in making participatory sustainability decisions at various organisational and governmental levels for smart cities.

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  • 2.
    Alsayegh, Maha Faisal
    et al.
    Faculty of Economics and Administration, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589, Saudi Arabia.
    Abdul Rahman, Rashidah
    Faculty of Economics and Administration, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589, Saudi Arabia.
    Homayoun, Saeid
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Business and Economic Studies, Business administration.
    Corporate Sustainability Performance and Firm Value through Investment Efficiency2023In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Corporate Sustainability Performance and Firm Value through Investment Efficiency, Vol. 15, no 1, article id 305Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the influence of corporate sustainability performance (CSP) on firm value through investment efficiency. By applying a panel regression analysis using a large sample of 26,838 firm-year observations that represent 9218 Asian listed companies over the period of 2012–2019, we illustrate that high corporate sustainability performance (CSP) increases investment efficiency. This result coincides with both stakeholder theory and information asymmetry theory where economic, environmental, social, and governance involvements play a fundamental role in improving firm value. Our results further show that the social dimension significantly improves investment decisions, unlike dimensions associated with environment and governance, which show no significant effect on investment efficiency. These insights about the impact of CSP on investment decisions will be useful to stakeholders, decision-makers, policymakers, as well as academics to improve their awareness of the importance of corporate sustainability practices. Particularly, the positive relationship between the social dimension of CSP and investment efficiency should motivate managers to improve their corporate social responsibility policy formation and implementation, and the management of investment portfolios in enhancing firm value.

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  • 3.
    Alsayegh, Maha Faisal
    et al.
    King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.
    Rahman, Rashidah Abdul
    King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.
    Homayoun, Saeid
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Business and Economic Studies, Business administration.
    Corporate economic, environmental, and social sustainability performance transformation through ESG disclosure2020In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 12, no 9, article id 3910Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Within the environmental, social, and governance (ESG) disclosure-corporate sustainability performance (economic, environmental and social; EES) framework, our empirical analysis examined the impact of ESG information disclosure on EES sustainability performance among Asian firms from 2005 to 2017. The positive ESG disclosure-EES sustainability performance relationship found in this study provides evidence that disclosing the implementation of environment and social strategies within an effective system of corporate governance in the organization strengthens corporate sustainability performance. The results also show that environmental performance and social performance are significantly positively related to economic sustainable performance, indicating that the corporation's economic value and creating value for society are interdependent. In line with the stakeholder theory and the shared value theory, ESG information disclosure to all stakeholders is an important factor in creating a competitive advantage for enhancing corporate sustainability performance.

  • 4.
    Andersson, Maria
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden .
    Eriksson, Ola
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Environmental engineering.
    von Borgstede, Chris
    Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden .
    The Effects of Environmental Management Systems on Source Separation in the Work and Home Settings2012In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 4, no 6, p. 1292-1308Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Measures that challenge the generation of waste are needed to address the global problem of the increasing volumes of waste that are generated in both private homes and workplaces. Source separation at the workplace is commonly implemented by environmental management systems (EMS). In the present study, the relationship between source separation at work and at home was investigated. A questionnaire that maps psychological and behavioural predictors of source separation was distributed to employees at different workplaces. The results show that respondents with awareness of EMS report higher levels of source separation at work, stronger environmental concern, personal and social norms, and perceive source separation to be less difficult. Furthermore, the results support the notion that after the adoption of EMS at the workplace, source separation at work spills over into source separation in the household. The potential implications for environmental management systems are discussed.

  • 5.
    Arfan, Muhammad
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building Engineering, Energy Systems and Sustainability Science, Environmental Science.
    Wang, Zhao
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building Engineering, Energy Systems and Sustainability Science, Environmental Science.
    Soam, Shveta
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building Engineering, Energy Systems and Sustainability Science, Environmental Science.
    Eriksson, Ola
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building Engineering, Energy Systems and Sustainability Science, Environmental Science.
    Biogas as a transport fuel—a system analysis of value chain development in a Swedish context2021In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 13, no 8, article id 4560Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Biofuels policy instruments are important in the development and diffusion of biogas as a transport fuel in Sweden. Their effectiveness with links to geodemographic conditions has not been analysed systematically in studying biogas development in a less urbanised regions, with high potential and primitive gas infrastructure. One such region identified is Gävleborg in Sweden. By using value chain statistics, interviews with related actors, and studying biofuels policy instruments and implications for biogas development, it is found that the policy measures have not been as effective in the region as in the rest of Sweden due to different geodemographic characteristics of the region, which has resulted in impeded biogas development. In addition to factors found in previous studies, the less-developed biogas value chain in this region can be attributed particularly to undefined rules of the game, which is lack of consensus on trade-off of resources and services, unnecessary competition among several fuel alternatives, as well as the ambiguity of municipalities’ prioritization, and regional cultural differences. To strengthen the regional biogas sector, system actors need a strategy to eliminate blocking effects of identified local factors, and national policy instruments should provide mechanisms to process geographical conditions in regulatory, economic support, and market formation.

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  • 6.
    Ascic, Ivana
    et al.
    Jönköping University.
    Ascic, Josip
    Jönköping University.
    Hilletofth, Per
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. Jönköping University.
    Pimenta, Marcio Lopes
    Federal University of Uberlandia, Brazil.
    Hilmola, Olli-Pekka
    LUT University, Finland; Estonian Maritime Academy, Tallinn University of Technology (Taltech).
    An evaluation of critical capabilities and improvement areas for competitive manufacturing in a developed country environment2022In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 14, no 11, article id 6678Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This research evaluates the critical capabilities and improvement areas for competitive manufacturing in a developed-country environment. A multiple-case-study approach is applied, consisting of three manufacturing firms located in Sweden. The case study combines both quantitative and qualitative evaluations of the critical capabilities found in the extant literature. The research reveals fifteen critical capabilities and sixteen improvement areas for competitive manufacturing in a developed-country environment. The results show that the firms develop capabilities in a cumulative manner, starting with cost and quality, continuing with time and flexibility, and finally trying to improve innovation and sustainability. To develop competitive manufacturing operations in developed counties, it is therefore vital to improve capabilities related to time, flexibility, innovation, or sustainability. Irrespective of the targeted capabilities, they must contribute to cost-efficient operations and high quality must always be maintained. The efforts to develop capabilities related to innovation and sustainability may be expensive in the short term, however they can provide better cumulative results and competitiveness in the long term. 

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  • 7.
    Barreiro-Gen, Maria
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Carpenter, Angela
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. School of Earth and Environment, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK.
    von Haartman, Robin
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. Organisational Sustainability Ltd., Cardiff, UK.
    Examining Relations Between Public Participation and Public Expenditure: Opinions from English and French Users on Environmental Issues in the English Channel2019In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 11, no 8, article id 2230Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Governments need to decide how to allocate their public expenditure, which is commonly misconstrued as simply targeting social issues. Most scientific literature highlights that the role of public spending is to enhance social welfare and fight poverty and inequality. Nonetheless, public expenditure also includes spending on environmental issues. This paper analyses relations between public participation, support for public expenditure, and pro-environmental behaviour (PEB) intentions in the English Channel region. An online public survey was developed to investigate public use of the English and French sides and the public's willingness to change their behaviour to better protect the Channel region. The survey was undertaken in the summer of 2014 and was answered by 2000 respondents. The Channel region public is willing to participate more in behaviour that involves direct changes or switches between buying/purchasing choices. In contrast, there is less willingness to engage in pro-environmental behaviour intentions that involve more active engagement activities. French respondents were slightly less inclined to change their consumer behaviour intentions, while women and older people were slightly more likely to do so. This research shows that pro-environmental behaviour could positively affect support for proposed public expenditure on environmental issues.

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  • 8.
    Barreiro-Gen, Maria
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. University of Gävle.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Zafar, Afnan
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Changes in Sustainability Priorities in Organisations due to the COVID-19 Outbreak: Averting Environmental Rebound Effects on Society2020In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 12, no 12, article id 5031Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The COVID-19 outbreak has affected societies and organisations in an unprecedented way. This has resulted in negative impacts to economic and social issues, but it is a “blessing in disguise” for environmental issues. This paper analyses how the outbreak has affected organisations’ sustainability priorities. Prior to the COVID-19 outbreak, such priorities were on the economic dimension followed by the environmental and social dimensions. A survey was sent to 11,657 organisations to analyse such changes, with a 5.60% response rate. The results show that for organisations, the main priority is now on the social dimension, followed by the economic one; however, the environmental dimension has suffered a negative impact in prioritisation, regardless of organisation type, country where they are based, organisation size, or the time they have been working on sustainability. We are currently facing an environmental conundrum, where air quality has improved and pollution has decreased in societies, but organisations are starting to neglect such environmental issues. The COVID-19 outbreak is an opportunity for organisations to better contribute to sustainability by ensuring that the efforts that have been undertaken in the last three decades are not forgotten, and that societies and organisations are better coupled to face such crises and avert rebound effects.

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  • 9.
    Bjärntoft, Sofie
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Hallman, David
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Zetterberg, Camilla
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Larsson, Johan
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research. Luleå University of Technology; LKAB, Gällivare.
    Edvinsson, Johanna
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Jahncke, Helena
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    A participatory approach to identify key areas for sustainable work environment and health in employees with flexible work arrangements2021In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 13, no 24, article id 13593Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Flexible work arrangements are common worldwide, but knowledge on how to achieve a sustainable work environment is sparse. The aim of this study was to use a participatory approach to identify concrete suggestions and key areas for improvement that were considered relevant, effective, and feasible for promoting good work environment and health at organizational, work group and individual level (O-G-I), among office employees with flexible work arrangements. Eight focus group interviews (including 45 employees) were conducted in a large Swedish government agency in 2017. By using a Tree diagram approach, employees made a total of 279 suggestions for improvements, which were sorted into O-G-I levels and mapped into 18 key areas. We found that 13 key areas addressed organizational level (e.g., improving leadership, policy, job demands, and work efficiency), two key areas addressed group level (create common rules of availability and activity-based working), and three key areas addressed individual level (e.g., individuals’ responsibility to clearly communicate their availability). The participatory process was effective in obtaining concrete suggestions and key areas in need of improvement, which may provide an action plan that can guide organizations in developing interventions to promote good work environment and health in flexible work. 

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  • 10.
    Blanco-Portela, Norka
    et al.
    Department of Environmental Faculty of Engineering, Universidad EAN, Bogotá, Colombia.
    R-Pertierra, Luis
    Department of Biogeography and Global Change, National Museum of Natural Sciences, Madrid, Spain.
    Benayas, Javier
    Department of Ecology, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Madrid, Spain.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Sustainability Leaders’ Perceptions on the Drivers for and the Barriers to the Integration of Sustainability in Latin American Higher Education Institutions2018In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 10, no 8, article id 2954Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Higher education institutions (HEIs) have been steadily progressing towards the integrationof sustainable practices in their structures and operations. Several studies have reported the varietyof drivers of change and the barriers to change that universities have found in the integrationprocess. The present investigation is aimed at further characterizing and ranking the drivers for,and barriers of, sustainability integration in HEIs within their structures and operating functions.Open-ended expert opinion interviews of key sustainability leaders appointed at 45 HEIs from10 Latin-American countries were conducted in order to learn lessons from their diverse experiencesof the process. Additionally, a thematic workshop on HEI sustainability was organized to facilitatefurther discussions between 23 sustainability scholars and/or national coordinators of universitynetworks from 11 Latin American countries. As a result, 15 barriers were identified as hinderingthe institutionalization of sustainability in HEIs. This study also examined the relationship betweenthese reported barriers with 13 main drivers that were identified to be facilitating the integration ofsustainable practices within the organizational and academic structures at the universities. The strongcorrespondence between the several observed drivers for, and barriers to, change highlights theimportance of strategic planning that offers integrated actions. The findings of this paper can serveas a reference to assist HEIs in identifying drivers of, and barriers to, sustainability, so that the formercan be fostered and the latter addressed effectively. This can help identify and plan targeted actionsto make the transition towards sustainability in HEIs more natural and effective.

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  • 11. Blomqvist, Stefan
    et al.
    La Fleur, Lina
    Linköpings universitet.
    Amiri, Shahnaz
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building Engineering, Energy Systems and Sustainability Science, Energy Systems and Building Technology.
    Rohdin, Patrik
    Linköpings universitet.
    Ödlund, Louise
    The Impact on System Performance When Renovating a Multifamily Building Stock in a District Heated Region2019In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 11, no 8, article id 2199Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, 90% of multifamily buildings utilize district heat and a large portion is in need of renovation. The aim is to analyze the impact of renovating a multifamily building stock in a district heating and cooling system, in terms of primary energy savings, peak power demands, electricity demand and production, and greenhouse gas emissions on local and global levels. The study analyzes scenarios regarding measures on the building envelope, ventilation, and substitution from district heat to ground source heat pump. The results indicate improved energy performance for all scenarios, ranging from 11% to 56%. Moreover, the scenarios present a reduction of fossil fuel use and reduced peak power demand in the district heating and cooling system ranging from 1 MW to 13 MW, corresponding to 4–48 W/m2 heated building area. However, the study concludes that scenarios including a ground source heat pump generate significantly higher global greenhouse gas emissions relative to scenarios including district heating. Furthermore, in a future fossil-free district heating and cooling system, a reduction in primary energy use will lead to a local reduction of emissions along with a positive effect on global greenhouse gas emissions, outperforming measures with a ground source heat pump.

  • 12.
    Chang, Elvi
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Criminology, Social Work.
    Sjöberg, Stefan
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Criminology, Social Work.
    Turunen, Päivi
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Criminology, Social Work.
    Rambaree, Komalsingh
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Criminology, Social Work.
    Youth Empowerment for Sustainable Development: Exploring Ecosocial Work Discourses2022In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 14, no 6, article id 3426Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Youth empowerment within the context of sustainable development (SD) is starting to gain more attention within social work, both internationally and in Sweden. SD, as an integrated set of global goals in tackling social, economic, and ecological challenges, is a vital concept in social work. Protecting people and the natural environment can be considered the fullest realization of the person-in-environment, a foundation upon which the social work profession is built. The ecosocial perspective is widely discussed in terms of societal transformation in harmony with nature. Within this context, this article explores ecosocial work discourses in youth empowerment. Data were gathered through 20 qualitative semi-structured interviews with key representatives of youth organizations from Gävle municipality, Sweden, and analyzed using ATLAS.ti v.9.0. The main findings are discussed within the framework of ecosocial work, youth empowerment, and a Foucauldian perspective on discourse, power, and knowledge. The results indicate the need for an ecosocial youth empowerment, calling for increased knowledge of both youth empowerment through SD and ecosocial work for those working with/for youth connected to social work practice. The results highlight the importance of an ecosocial youth empowerment on a more structural and collective level.

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  • 13.
    Chowdhury, Ehsanul
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Business and Economic Studies, Business administration.
    Backlund Rambaree, Brita
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Criminology, Social Work.
    Macassa, Gloria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Public Health and Sport Science, Public Health Science.
    CSR Reporting of Stakeholders’ Health: Proposal for a New Perspective2021In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 13, no 3, article id 1133Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim of the paper is to identify and categorize disclosures from the Global Reporting Initiative Sustainability Reporting Standards (GRI Standards) that have direct or indirect influence on health of external or internal stakeholders.

    Methodology: GRI core and comprehensive disclosures (as part of universal standards and topic-specific standards related to economic, environmental and social topics) that can be used by businesses for CSR reporting were grouped as to have direct or indirect influence on external and internal stakeholders’ health.

    Findings: The study proposes a systematic way of conceiving GRI standards in terms of direct or indirect influence on the health and well-being of internal and external stakeholders.

    Originality/Value: This is the first study that provides a classification of core and comprehensive GRI disclosures that have direct or indirect influence on the health of external or internal stakeholders. This classification will allow businesses to easily report those CSR activities that might be of importance to stakeholders’ health promotion. 

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  • 14.
    Colding, Johan
    et al.
    The Beijer Institute of Ecological Economics, Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden; Stockholm Resilience Center, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Barthel, Stephan
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Environmental engineering. Stockholm Resilience Center, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    The Role of University Campuses in Reconnecting Humans to the Biosphere2017In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 9, no 12, article id 2349Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we explore the potential for integrating university campuses in a global sustainability agenda for a closer reconnection of urban residents to the biosphere. This calls for a socio-cultural transition that allows universities and colleges to reconnect to the biosphere and become active stewards of the Earth System. Recognizing their pivotal role of fostering coming generations of humans, university campuses represent a unique socio-cultural setting to promote sustainable development in practice. Among others, this involves the nurturing of biodiversity and ecosystem services in the Antropocene era, which is characterized by ongoing climate change and massive loss of biodiversity and ecosystem services. We explore the traditional campus setting, its role as a community for rejuvenating town planning and its role as a governance authority that may promote or retard sustainable development with an ecological focus. We explore the “sustainable” university and describe the campus as an ecosystem and how a resilient campus can be designed to meet the novel and critical challenges of the Anthropocene. We conclude by providing some policy recommendations for higher educational institutes to speed up their ambitions in the area of sustainable biosphere management.

  • 15.
    Colding, Johan
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building Engineering, Energy Systems and Sustainability Science, Environmental Science. Beijerinstitutet för Ekologisk Ekonomi, KVA.
    Giusti, Matteo
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building Engineering, Energy Systems and Sustainability Science, Environmental Science.
    Haga, Andreas
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building Engineering, Energy Systems and Sustainability Science, Environmental Science.
    Wallhagen, Marita
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building Engineering, Energy Systems and Sustainability Science, Environmental Science.
    Barthel, Stephan
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building Engineering, Energy Systems and Sustainability Science, Environmental Science. Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholms universitet.
    Enabling relationships with nature in cities2020In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 12, article id 4394Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Limited exposure to direct nature experiences is a worrying sign of urbanization, particularly for children. Experiencing nature during childhood shapes aspects of a personal relationship with nature, crucial for sustainable decision-making processes in adulthood. Scholars often stress the need to ‘reconnect’ urban dwellers with nature; however, few elaborate on how this can be achieved. Here, we argue that nature reconnection requires urban ecosystems, with a capacity to enable environmental learning in the cognitive, affective and psychomotor domains, i.e., learning that occurs in the head, heart and hands of individuals. Drawing on environmental psychology, urban ecology, institutional analysis and urban planning, we present a theoretical framework for Human–Nature Connection (HNC), discuss the importance of nurturing HNC for children, elaborate on the role of property-rights and the importance of creating collective action arenas in cities for the promotion of urban resilience building. As values and environmental preconceptions underly environmental behavior, there are limits to achieving HNC in cities, as presumptive sentiments toward nature not always are positive. We end by discussing the role of new digital technologies in relation to HNC, and conclude by summarizing the major points brought forward herein, offering policy recommendations for HNC as a resilience strategy that can be adopted in cities throughout the world.

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  • 16.
    Colding, Johan
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building Engineering, Energy Systems and Sustainability Science, Environmental Science. Beijerinstitutet för Ekologisk Ekonomi, KVA.
    Wallhagen, Marita
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building Engineering, Energy Systems and Sustainability Science, Environmental Science.
    Sörqvist, Patrik
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building Engineering, Energy Systems and Sustainability Science, Environmental Science.
    Marcus, Lars
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Hillman, Karl
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building Engineering, Energy Systems and Sustainability Science, Environmental Science.
    Samuelsson, Karl
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building Engineering, Energy Systems and Sustainability Science, Environmental Science.
    Barthel, Stephan
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building Engineering, Energy Systems and Sustainability Science, Environmental Science. Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University.
    Applying a Systems Perspective on the Notion of the Smart City2020In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 3, no 2, article id 22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper focuses on the need for a widened definition of the notion of technology within the smart city discourse, with a particular focus on the “built environment”. The first part of the paper describes how current tendencies in urban design and architecture are inclined to prioritize high tech-solutions at the expense of low-tech functionalities and omits that information and communication technology (ICT) contrasts the art of building cities as an adaptable and habitually smart technology in itself. It continues with an elaboration on the need for expanding the limits of system boundaries for a better understanding of the energy and material telecouplings that are linked to ICT solutions and account for some perils inherent in smart technologies, such as rebound effects and the difficulty of measuring the environmental impacts of ICT solutions on a city level. The second part of the paper highlights how low-tech technologies and nature-based solutions can make cities smarter, representing a new technology portfolio in national and international policies for safeguarding biodiversity and the delivery of a range of ecosystem services, promoting the necessary climate-change adaption that cities need to prioritize to confer resilience.

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  • 17.
    Elias, Marcelo
    et al.
    University of Sao Paolo, Brazil.
    Bartocci Liboni, Lara
    University of Sao Paolo, Brazil; Western University Canada.
    Cezarino, Luciana O.
    Ca’ Foscari University of Venice, Italy.
    Pinheiro Martins, Flavio
    University of Sao Paolo, Brazil.
    Lopes Pimenta, Márcio
    Federal University of Uberlândia, Brazil.
    Hilletofth, Per
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. Jönköping University.
    Hilmola, Olli-Pekka
    LUT University, Finland; Tallinn University of Technology (Taltech), Estonia.
    Shedding Light on the Brazilian Amazon Biotrade: A Study on Sustainable Development in Native Communities2022In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 14, no 19, article id 12826Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Amazon is a biodiversity hotspot. Around 90% of its territory is inhabited by native communities, who spontaneously organize themselves into groups of extractivists and small producers, relying on biodiversity as their primary means of sustenance. This paper aims to discuss how the biotrade of Amazonian biodiversity goods affects native communities with respect to environmental, social, and economic sustainability. Based on a sample of 178 native extractivists in four communities, we concluded that biotrade enabled native communities to market their products by adapting to existing conditions, considering the difficulties and the expectations of traditional residents, and contributed to the three dimensions of sustainable development.

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  • 18.
    Eriksson, Ola
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Environmental engineering.
    Nuclear power and resource efficiency-A proposal for a revised primary energy factor2017In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 9, no 6, article id 1063Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Measuring resource efficiency can be achieved using different methods, of which primary energy demand is commonly used. The primary energy factor (PEF) is a figure describing how much energy from primary resources is being used per unit of energy delivered. The PEF for nuclear power is typically 3, which refers to thermal energy released from fission in relation to electricity generated. Fuel losses are not accounted for. However; nuclear waste represents an energy loss, as current plans for nuclear waste management mostly include final disposal. Based on a literature review and mathematical calculations of the power-to-fuel ratio for nuclear power, PEF values for the open nuclear fuel cycle (NFC) option of nuclear power and different power mixes are calculated. These calculations indicate that a more correct PEF for nuclear power would be 60 (range 32-88); for electricity in Sweden (41% nuclear power) PEF would change from 1.8 to 25.5, and the average PEF for electricity in the European Union (EU) would change from 2.5 to 18. The results illustrate the poor resource efficiency of nuclear power, which paves the way for the fourth generation of nuclear power and illustrates the policy implication of using PEFs which are inconsistent with current waste management plans.

  • 19.
    Findler, Florian
    et al.
    Institute for Managing Sustainability, WU Vienna University of Economics and Business, Vienna, Austria.
    Schönherr, Norma
    Institute for Managing Sustainability, WU Vienna University of Economics and Business, Vienna, Austria.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Stacherl, Barbara
    Institute for Managing Sustainability, WU Vienna University of Economics and Business, Vienna, Austria.
    Assessing the Impacts of Higher Education Institutions on Sustainable Development: An Analysis of Tools and Indicators2019In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 11, no 1, article id 59Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many higher education institutions (HEIs) have started to incorporate sustainable development (SD) into their system. A variety of sustainability assessment tools (SATs) have been developed to support HEIs to systematically measure, audit, benchmark, and communicate SD efforts. In recent years, stakeholders have increasingly asked HEIs to demonstrate their impacts on SD. These impacts are the direct and indirect effects an HEI has outside of its organizational boundaries on society, the natural environment, and the economy. This study analyzes to what extent SATs are capable of measuring the impacts that HEIs have on SD. A mixed-method approach, using descriptive statistics and an inductive content analysis, was used to examine 1134 indicators for sustainability assessment derived from 19 SATs explicitly designed for application by HEIs. The findings reveal that SATs largely neglect the impacts HEIs have outside their organizational boundaries. SATs primarily use proxy indicators based on internally available data to assess impacts and thus tend to focus on themes concerning the natural environment and the contribution to the local economy. Updating existing SATs and developing new ones may enable HEIs to fully realize their potential to contribute to SD. 

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  • 20.
    Finnveden, Göran
    et al.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, School of Architecture and Built Environment, Department of Urban Planning and Environment, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Ekvall, Tomas
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Arushanyan, Yevgeniya
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, School of Architecture and Built Environment, Department of Urban Planning and Environment, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Bisaillon, Mattias
    Profu AB, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Henriksson, Greger
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, School of Architecture and Built Environment, Department of Urban Planning and Environment, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Gunnarsson Östling, Ulrika
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, School of Architecture and Built Environment, Department of Urban Planning and Environment, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Ljunggren Söderman, Maria
    Chalmers University of Technology, Environmental Systems Analysis Energy and Environment, Göteborg, Sweden .
    Sahlin, Jenny
    Profu AB, Mölndal, Sweden .
    Stenmarck, Åsa
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Sundberg, Johan
    Profu AB, Mölndal, Sweden .
    Sundqvist, Jan-Olov
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Svenfelt, Åsa
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, School of Architecture and Built Environment, Department of Urban Planning and Environment, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Söderholm, Patrik
    Luleå University of Technology, Economics Unit, Luleå, Sweden .
    Björklund, Anna
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, School of Architecture and Built Environment, Department of Urban Planning and Environment, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Eriksson, Ola
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Environmental engineering.
    Forsfält, Tomas
    Konjunkturinstitutet, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Guath, Mona
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, School of Architecture and Built Environment, Department of Urban Planning and Environment, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Policy Instruments towards a Sustainable Waste Management2013In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 841-881Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to suggest and discuss policy instruments that could lead towards a more sustainable waste management. The paper is based on evaluations from a large scale multi-disciplinary Swedish research program. The evaluations focus on environmental and economic impacts as well as social acceptance. The focus is on the Swedish waste management system but the results should be relevant also for other countries. Through the assessments and lessons learned during the research program we conclude that several policy instruments can be effective and possible to implement. Particularly, we put forward the following policy instruments: "Information"; "Compulsory recycling of recyclable materials"; "Weight-based waste fee in combination with information and developed recycling systems"; "Mandatory labeling of products containing hazardous chemicals", "Advertisements on request only and other waste minimization measures"; and "Differentiated VAT and subsidies for some services". Compulsory recycling of recyclable materials is the policy instrument that has the largest potential for decreasing the environmental impacts with the configurations studied here. The effects of the other policy instruments studied may be more limited and they typically need to be implemented in combination in order to have more significant impacts. Furthermore, policy makers need to take into account market and international aspects when implementing new instruments. In the more long term perspective, the above set of policy instruments may also need to be complemented with more transformational policy instruments that can significantly decrease the generation of waste.

  • 21.
    Fobbe, Lea
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Analysing organisational collaboration practices for sustainability2020In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 12, no 6, article id 2466Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The complex sustainability challenges that society faces require organisations to engage in collaborative partnerships. Stakeholders affect, and are affected by an organisation’s sustainability activities, making it an important element when deciding with whom to collaborate. A large number of studies have focussed on collaboration for sustainability, especially on vertical and dyadic partnerships and collaborative networks, while there is limited research on overarching collaboration activities from the perspective of individual organisations (for example, the Kyosei approach), and even less that includes a stakeholder perspective. The objective of this paper is to analyse with whom individual organisations collaborate and how stakeholders affecting and being affected by sustainability efforts are considered when choosing collaboration partners. A survey was sent to a database of 5216 organisations, from which 271 responses were received. The responses were analysed using non-parametric tests. The results show that organisations are engaged in collaboration activities for sustainability, collaborating mostly with two to three external stakeholders. However, the focus on collaboration for sustainability does not extend to a point that it would lead to a change of organisational practice nor do organisations necessarily consider how stakeholders affect and are affected by their efforts when choosing their collaboration partners. An update to the Kyosei process is proposed, in order to provide guidance on how to strengthen and extend collaborative partnerships for sustainability.

  • 22.
    Friman, Margareta
    et al.
    Karlstads universitet, Handelshögskolan (from 2013).
    Lättman, Katrin
    Karlstads universitet, SAMOT.
    Olsson, Lars E.
    Karlstads universitet, Handelshögskolan (from 2013).
    Carpoolers' perceived accessibility of carpooling2020In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 12, no 21, article id 8976Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to constitute a realistic option to existing travel modes, carpooling needs to be able to offer adequate levels of accessibility. Insights into how carpooling services affect perceived accessibility up until now remain unexplored. In this study we explore carpooling experiences of 122 users in Sweden and examine a number of possible determinants of the perceived accessibility of carpooling. Results show that carpooling is not perceived by the users as particularly accessible with low levels across the sample. Moreover, multiple linear hierarchical regression analyses show that simplicity of travel, population density, years of education, and school and work-trips appear to affect perceptions of accessibility of carpooling, whereas travel time and cost appear not to. The final model explains a third of the variance in perceived accessibility of carpooling, thus nearly two thirds of the variation is still unaccounted for. Future research should explore further possible determinants of perceived accessibility of carpooling in order to explain, understand, and counteract the low levels of accessibility that appear to be linked to this specific travel mode.

  • 23.
    Friman, Margareta
    et al.
    Karlstads universitet, Institutionen för sociala och psykologiska studier (from 2013).
    Lättman, Katrin
    Karlstads universitet.
    Olsson, Lars E.
    Karlstads universitet, Institutionen för sociala och psykologiska studier (from 2013).
    Public Transport Quality, Safety, and Perceived Accessibility2020In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 12, no 9, article id 3563Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Service quality in public transport is proposed as a key determinant of perceived accessibility, the ease to live the life one wants with the help of the transport system, as low service quality may be a barrier for use, decreasing the ease to participate in daily activities. The first aim was to validate the direct relationship between public transport quality and perceived accessibility. Secondly, we analyzed the mediating role of safety perceptions to better explain the link between service quality and perceived accessibility. Public transport travelers (n = 4944) from five northern European cities were surveyed. Results from PLS-SEM modeling show that service quality has a significant and direct relationship with perceived accessibility, especially regarding functionality. An indirect relationship through travel safety perceptions was also observed, highlighting information and comfort as main drivers. High car use, low public transport use, increasing age, and being a woman were also associated with greater perceived accessibility. City comparisons yielded a number of significant differences. Our results contribute to the research literature by highlighting the importance of service quality in public transport for perceptions of accessibility in daily travel. In particular, we argue that functionality is the core attribute to focus on, and that attributes related to travel safety perceptions should be carefully considered when planning for sustainable transport.

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  • 24.
    Haldrup, Karin
    et al.
    Aalborg University.
    Snällfot, David
    University of Gävle.
    On financing of urban transition viewed from the Oresund area: when the political agenda of urban transition meets the market2014In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 6, no 12, p. 9057-9079Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The "urban transition" agenda is as a conglomerate of ambitions derived from international policy documents and as applied in the Oresund area. Encompassing locally set goals for (i) climate change mitigation; (ii) energy efficiency; and (iii) human wellbeing in the built environment. Its implementation is largely dependent on private sector joining in, since transitioning the building stock is to be financed by the market. This paper explores strategies to meet this agenda in the Oresund area. A particular focus is on the refurbishment of multi-family housing relative to these set goals. The paper finds meaningful differences between Denmark and Sweden. In general, exceptionally high energy standards come at an additional cost that is likely to be incompatible with rational economic behavior. Furthermore, actions appropriate for one goal are likely to have modest effects on ancillary goals. The paper concludes by suggesting to revisit current strategies in the Oresund area to reflect market constraints and to promote more coherent ways to achieve the set goals.

  • 25.
    Hasan, A. S. M. M.
    et al.
    Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Bangladesh Army International University of Science and Technology, Cumilla, Bangladesh.
    Hossain, R.
    Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Bangladesh Army International University of Science and Technology, Cumilla, Bangladesh.
    Tuhin, R. A.
    Department of Computer Science and Engineering, East West University, Dhaka, Bangladesh.
    Sakib, T. H.
    Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Bangladesh Army International University of Science and Technology, Cumilla, Bangladesh.
    Thollander, Patrik
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building Engineering, Energy Systems and Sustainability Science, Energy Systems and Building Technology. Division of Energy Systems, Department of Management and Engineering, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Empirical investigation of barriers and driving forces for efficient energy management practices in non-energy-intensive manufacturing industries of Bangladesh2019In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 11, no 9, article id 2671Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Improved energy efficiency is being considered as one of the significant challenges to mitigating climate change all over the world. While developed countries have already adopted energy management and auditing practices to improve energy efficiency, the developing countries lag far behind. There are a limited number of studies which have been conducted in the context of developing countries, which mostly revolve around highly energy-intensive sectors. This study looks into the existence and importance of the challenges to and motivating forces for the adoption of energy management practices in Bangladesh, a developing country, focusing on the non-energy-intensive manufacturing industries. Conducted as a multiple case study, the results indicate the existence of several barriers towards adopting and implementing the management of energy practices in the non-energy-intensive industries of Bangladesh, where among them, "other preferences for capital venture" and "inadequate capital expenditure" are the most dominant. This study also identified a number of driving forces that can accelerate the acceptance of energy efficiency practices, such as the demands from the owner, loans, subsidies, and a lowered cost-benefit ratio. Findings of this study could assist the concerned stakeholders to develop beneficial policies and a proper regulatory framework for the non-energy-intensive industries of developing countries like Bangladesh. © 2019 by the authors.

  • 26.
    Hilmola, Olli-Pekka
    et al.
    LUT University, Finland; Tallinn University of Technology (Taltech), Estonia.
    Lähdeaho, Oskari
    LUT University, Finland.
    Henttu, Ville
    South-Eastern Finland University of Applied Sciences.
    Hilletofth, Per
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. Jönköping University.
    Covid-19 Pandemic: Early Implications for North European Manufacturing and Logistics2020In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 12, no 20, article id 8315Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    From early 2020 onwards, the world has been going through an unprecedented wave of lockdowns, shutdowns, and preventive measures due to the Covid-19 pandemic. It is evident that these have been harmful for tourism, passenger transport, and the service sector in general. However, less is known regarding the implications for manufacturing and logistics, which is the purpose of this research. We concentrate on reporting survey findings from Northern Europe, and mostly from Finland. Based on trade accounts, it is evident that Covid-19 has had significant impacts on Finnish import and export. However, in survey responses, companies report that they have mostly been able to serve customers in a good fashion, and the pandemic has increased transportation costs only moderately. Inventories might experience an increase due to the virus, however, in the longer term they will likely remain at the earlier levels (or slightly increase). Companies are mostly afraid of the effects of the second wave of the epidemic, and are also already thinking about the long-term issues with transportation modes used together with supply chain dependencies. For example, the Chinese and, in part, Russian, markets are increasingly being served by railways during the current decade. For some companies (especially small and medium-sized ones) and foreign trade markets, however, the epidemic era has been very harmful. Therefore, as a conclusion we argue that the pandemic is causing rather asymmetrical impacts on manufacturing and logistics.

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  • 27.
    Homayoun, Saeid
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Business and Economic Studies, Business administration.
    Imeny, Vahid Molla
    Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad, Iran.
    Salehi, Mahdi
    Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad, Iran.
    Moradi, Mahdi
    Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad, Iran.
    Norton, Simon
    University of Cardiff, Cardiff, UK.
    Which is more concerning for accounting professionals - personal risk or professional risk?2022In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 14, no 22, article id 15452Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Personal and professional risks have been considered separately in research. However, these two concepts have not so far been investigated in research together. In this study, we first tested the importance of these two risks for Iranian accounting professionals through trade-off scenarios. The analysis of data gathered from an online survey of 487 Iranian accounting professionals shows that accounting professionals in Iran prefer to avoid personal risk rather than professional risk when facing a choice between personal and professional risk. Iranian accountants and auditors are personal risk averters and professional risk lovers, even though they think they are not risk-averse in their personal lives and not risk takers in their professional lives. Therefore, there is a gap between Iranian accounting professionals’ thoughts about their personal and professional risk aversion and their personal and professional risk aversion in practice. Furthermore, we found significant relationships between accounting professionals’ gender, religiosity, welfare, and personal risk aversion. In addition, there are significant relationships between accounting professionals’ gender and personal and professional risk aversion. 

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  • 28.
    Homayoun, Saeid
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Business and Economic Studies, Business administration.
    Mashayekhi, Bita
    Department of Accounting and Auditing, Faculty of Management, University of Tehran, Tehran 1411713114, Iran.
    Jahangard, Amin
    Department of Accounting and Auditing, Faculty of Management, University of Tehran, Tehran 1411713114, Iran.
    Samavat, Milad
    Department of Accounting and Auditing, Faculty of Management, University of Tehran, Tehran 1411713114, Iran.
    Rezaee, Zabihollah
    Crews School of Accountancy, Fogelman College of Business and Economics, University of Memphis, Memphis, TN 38152, USA.
    The Controversial Link between CSR and Financial Performance: The Mediating Role of Green Innovation2023In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 15, no 13, article id 10650Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The contentious relationship between corporate social responsibility (CSR) and corporate financial performance (CFP) has been extensively and yet inconclusively debated in the sustainability literature. We further investigate the link between CSR and CFP by examining the mediating role of green innovation performance (GIP). We perform pooled ordinary least squares (OLS) analysis on a panel data of UK firms from 2006 to 2017 provided by the ASSET4 database. We find that CSR is positively and significantly associated with CFP and that GIP plays a significant and positive mediating role in this relationship. Our findings contribute to the extant sustainability literature by using a comprehensive measure of CFP and addressing the mediating effects of GIP on the link between CSR and CFP. The results provide policy, practice, and research implications as investors demand more robust CSR information, regulators establish environmental and climate change rules, and companies focus on the efficiency and effectiveness of their green innovation practices and performance.

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  • 29.
    Homayoun, Saeid
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Business and Economic Studies, Business administration.
    Velashani, Mohammad Ali Bagherpour
    Faculty of Economics and Administrative Sciences, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad 9177948974, Iran.
    Abbas Alkhafaji, Bashaer Khdhair
    Faculty of Economics and Administrative Sciences, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad 9177948974, Iran.
    Jabbar Mezher, Siham
    Faculty of Economics and Administrative Sciences, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad 9177948974, Iran.
    The Effect of COVID-19 on the Performance of SMEs in Emerging Markets in Iran, Iraq and Jordan2023In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 15, no 10, article id 7847Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    his research aims to investigate the effect of COVID-19 on the performance of small and medium enterprises (SMEs) in emerging markets in Iran, Iraq and Jordan. In order to collect the required data, a standard questionnaire provided in the literature was used. The research period is the second quarter of 2022, and its population includes managers, accountants and auditors engaged in listed and non-listed companies. The research findings indicate that the outbreak of COVID-19 has affected SMEs’ performance in investigated emerging markets. For the first time, this research has examined the impact of COVID-19 on the performance of SMEs in emerging markets. The research was conducted in the three countries of Iran, Iraq and Jordan, which have different environmental conditions indicating the impact of contextual factors on the effects of the spread of COVID-19. The results can be useful for different parties, such as SMEs’ owners and regulatory bodies in similar markets.

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  • 30.
    Jabbari, Mona
    et al.
    CitUpia AB.
    Ahmadi, Zahra
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Business and Economic Studies, Business administration.
    Ramos, Rui
    Urban and Regional Planning, Department of Civil Engineering, University of Minho, 4710-057 Braga, Portugal.
    Defining a digital system for the pedestrian network as a conceptual implementation framework2022In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 14, no 5, article id 528Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In cities today, the digitalization of mobility is one of the most crucial tools that link each single mobility service providers (e.g., ride sharing, public transportation, air travel, etc.) to users. Based on the smart pedestrian network model, the purpose of this study is to initially provide the requirements towards the digitalization of a pedestrian network model and subsequently to draft an institutional framework towards the effective implementation and management of pedestrian mobility that will develop/create a pedestrian network as a new structure in the city. The methodology is applied in three phases, with three separate approaches: “desk approach” for a data gathering standard that is knowledge-based and connected to walkability; a “digitalization approach” for citizen and stakeholder participation in policy co-creation; and a “business approach”. A business approach is defined as a set of operations that takes one or more types of input and produces a customer-valued outcome. In this case, customers are citizens and the business approach by applying a digital system is assessing policies and finding/defining an optimized combination of shared applicable/effective policies to implement the pedestrian network. By boosting an innovative linkage of these three phases, digitalization of the pedestrian network has great potential to improve the walkability planning process and therefore to create more sustainable and livable urban spaces.

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  • 31.
    Jacobson, Lisa
    et al.
    Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University.
    Åkerman, Jonas
    KTH.
    Giusti, Matteo
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building Engineering, Energy Systems and Sustainability Science, Environmental Science.
    Bhowmik, K. Avit
    Karlstads universitet.
    Tipping to staying on the ground: Internalized knowledge of climate change crucial for transformed air travel behavior2020In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 12, no 5, article id 1994Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Air travel accounts for a major share of individual greenhouse gas emissions, particularly for people in high-income countries. Until recently, few have reduced flying because of climate concerns, but currently, a movement for staying on the ground is rising. Sweden has been a focal point for this movement, particularly during 2018–2019, when a flight tax was introduced, and air travel reduction was intensely discussed in the media. We performed semi-structured interviews with Swedish residents, focusing primarily on individuals who have reduced flying because of its climate impact. We explore how such individual transformation of air travel behavior comes about, and the phases and components of this process. Applying a framework of sustainability transformation, we identify incentives and barriers in personal and political spheres. We show that internalized knowledge about climate change and the impact of air travel is crucial for instigating behavioral change. Awareness evokes negative emotions leading to a personal tipping point where a decision to reduce or quit flying is made. However, the process is often counteracted by both personal values and political structures promoting air travel. Even individuals with a strong drive to reduce flying feel trapped in social practices, norms and infrastructures. Hence, we argue that personal and political spheres interact complexly and to reduce flying at larger scales, interventions are needed across spheres, e.g., change of norms, effective policy instruments and better alternatives to air travel.

  • 32.
    Jamei, Elmira
    et al.
    Institute for Sustainable Industries & Liveable Cities (ISILC), Victoria University, Melbourne, VIC 3011, Australia.
    Chan, Melissa
    Institute for Sustainable Industries & Liveable Cities (ISILC), Victoria University, Melbourne, VIC 3011, Australia.
    Chau, Hing Wah
    Institute for Sustainable Industries & Liveable Cities (ISILC), Victoria University, Melbourne, VIC 3011, Australia.
    Gaisie, Eric
    Institute for Sustainable Industries & Liveable Cities (ISILC), Victoria University, Melbourne, VIC 3011, Australia; La Trobe University, Melbourne; University of Melbourne .
    Lättman, Katrin
    Karlstads universitet.
    Perceived Accessibility and Key Influencing Factors in Transportation2022In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 14, no 17, article id 10806Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Accessibility is commonly assessed using indicators calculated from spatial data. Comparatively perceived accessibility cannot be adequately reflected by these calculated measures because it involves the perception to participate in spatially dispersed opportunities. This highlights the need to understand and consider perceived accessibility for planning and evaluation of transport systems from a complementary perspective. Therefore, this study aims to offer a systematic review concerning the interpretations of perceived accessibility in transport, its concept, major social drivers, barriers, evaluation methods and key influencing factors. This review also highlights the importance of perceived safety and service quality in public transport and their relationship with perceived accessibility in daily travel. The paper argues that perceived accessibility with due consideration of perceived safety and service quality will contribute to the development from mobility-based to accessibility-based planning.

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  • 33.
    Jiang, Bin
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Computer and Geospatial Sciences, Geospatial Sciences.
    A recursive definition of goodness of space for bridging the concepts of space and place for sustainability2019In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 11, no 15, article id 4091Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Conceived and developed by Christopher Alexander through his life's work, The Nature of Order, wholeness is defined as a mathematical structure of physical space in our surroundings. Yet, there was no mathematics, as Alexander admitted then, that was powerful enough to capture his notion of wholeness. Recently, a mathematical model of wholeness, together with its topological representation, has been developed that is capable of addressing not only why a space is good, but also how much goodness the space has. This paper develops a structural perspective on goodness of space (both large- and small-scale) in order to bridge two basic concepts of space and place through the very concept of wholeness. The wholeness provides a de facto recursive definition of goodness of space from a holistic and organic point of view. A space is good, genuinely and objectively, if its adjacent spaces are good, the larger space to which it belongs is good, and what is contained in the space is also good. Eventually, goodness of space, or sustainability of space, is considered a matter of fact rather than of opinion under the new view of space: space is neither lifeless nor neutral, but a living structure capable of being more living or less living, or more sustainable or less sustainable. Under the new view of space, geography or architecture will become part of complexity science, not only for understanding complexity, but also for making and remaking complex or living structures. 

  • 34.
    Joanna, Sanecka
    et al.
    Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Barthel, Stephan
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building Engineering, Energy Systems and Sustainability Science, Environmental Science. Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Colding, Johan
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building Engineering, Energy Systems and Sustainability Science, Environmental Science. Stockholm Resilience Centre; The Beijer Institute of Ecological Economics, Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences.
    Countryside within the city: A motivating vision behind civic green area stewardship in Warsaw, Poland2020In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 12, no 6, article id 2313Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the midst of the epoch of the Urban Anthropocene, citizen engagement is an important step on the path of creating local and global sustainability. However, the factors that motivate civic urban dwellers to become voluntary stewards of nature environments inside cities need research. This is an empirical study based on deep interviews and a grounded theory approach focused on the“inner world” of people inWarsaw, Poland, that engage in green area stewardship. Our approach reveals a commonly shared vision as the prime motivator powering agency in green area stewardship.This vision was articulated as creating a countryside within the city characterized by a stronger sense of community, a shared sense of place and an enhanced connection with nature. While other studies have found inner values or direct benefits as motivating factors for engaging in urban stewardship,we instead found a green vision for re-designing what the “urban” could be like as the prime motivator for transformation—a vision with potential global sustainability implications.

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  • 35.
    Jägerbrand, Annika
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Rydberglaboratoriet för tillämpad naturvetenskap (RLAS).
    Development of an indicator system for local governments to plan and evaluate sustainable outdoor lighting2021In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 13, no 3, article id 1506Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Outdoor lighting offers many benefits to its users and is often considered a necessity for an active lifestyle when living in modern society. Sustainable outdoor lighting should fulfil the functional needs of the users, be cost-and energy-efficient, and result in minimal environmental impact. So far, a limited number of studies have been able to present clear strategies on how to plan and use outdoor lighting to ensure that it contributes towards sustainable development. Therefore, this study aimed to answer the following questions: (1) How many of the previously established sustainability indicators are already used by municipalities in their lighting planning? (2) Which types of indicators are not used by municipalities? Another aim of the study was to further develop the framework of sustainability indicators by adding new indicators that were identified from lighting plans of Swedish municipalities and the existing literature. In this study, lighting master plans from 16 randomly chosen Swedish municipalities with varying population sizes were analyzed. The results show that few sustainable indicators are used by the municipalities’ lighting plans, especially in the social dimension. The existing framework of sustainability indicators was developed by adding new indicators. Furthermore, 28 new indicators were identified, eight originated from new studies and the literature, and 20 originated from the municipalities’ lighting master plans. This study shows that there is a need for guidelines and recommendations for working with outdoor lighting from a sustainability perspective, especially in the social dimension of sustainability, where most of the new indicators were identified. © 2021 by the author. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.

  • 36.
    Jägerbrand, Annika
    Statens väg- och transportforskningsinstitut.
    New Framework of Sustainable Indicators for Outdoor LED (Light Emitting Diodes) Lighting and SSL (Solid State Lighting)2015In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 1028-1063Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Light emitting diodes (LEDs) and SSL (solid state lighting) are relatively  new light sources, but are already widely applied for outdoor lighting. Despite this, there is little available information allowing planners and designers to evaluate and weigh different sustainability aspects of LED/SSL lighting when making decisions. Based on a literature review, this paper proposes a framework of sustainability indicators and/or measures that can be used for a general evaluation or to highlight certain objectives or aspects of special interest when choosing LED/SSL lighting. LED/SSL lighting is reviewed from a conventional sustainable development perspective, i.e., covering the three dimensions, including ecological, economic and social sustainability. The new framework of sustainable indicators allow prioritization when choosing LED/SSL products and can thereby help ensure that short-term decisions on LED/SSL lighting systems are in line with long-term sustainability goals established in society. The new framework can also be a beneficial tool for planners, decision-makers, developers and lighting designers, or for consumers wishing to use LED/SSL lighting in  a sustainable manner. Moreover, since some aspects of LED/SSL lighting have not yet been thoroughly studied or developed, some possible future indicators are suggested.

  • 37.
    Jägerbrand, Annika
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Rydberglaboratoriet för tillämpad naturvetenskap (RLAS).
    Bouroussis, Constantinos A.
    National Technical University of Athens, Athens, Greece.
    Ecological impact of artificial light at night: Effective strategies and measures to deal with protected species and habitats2021In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 13, no 11, article id 5991Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When conserving or protecting rare or endangered species, current general guidelines for reducing light pollution might not suffice to ensure long-term threatened species’ survival. Many protected areas are exposed to artificial light at levels with the potential to induce ecological impacts with unknown implications for the ecosystems they are designated to protect. Consequently, it is recommended that precautionary methods for the avoidance and mitigation of light pollution in protected areas be integrated into their management plans. This paper’s aims are to present an overview of best practices in precautionary methods to avoid and mitigate light pollution in protected areas and to identify and discuss what ecosystems should be considered light-sensitive and how to prioritise species and habitats that need protection from artificial light, including examples of legislation covering ecological light pollution in the European Union and in Sweden. The important aspects to include when considering light pollution at a landscape level are listed, and a proposal for prioritisation among species and habitats is suggested. Sensitive and conservation areas and important habitats for particularly vulnerable species could be prioritised for measures to minimise artificial lighting’s negative effects on biodiversity. This may be done by classifying protected natural environments into different zones and applying more constrained principles to limit lighting. The light pollution sensitivity of various environments and ecosystems suggests that different mitigation strategies and adaptations should be used depending on landscape characteristics, species sensitivity and other factors that may determine whether artificial light may be detrimental. Issues of the currently used measurement methods for artificial light at night are reviewed. We also propose and discuss the principles and benefits of using standardized measurement methods and appropriate instrumentation for field measurements of artificial light concerning the environmental impact of light pollution. © 2021 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.

  • 38.
    Kabanshi, Alan
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building Engineering, Energy Systems and Sustainability Science, Energy Systems and Building Technology.
    Are We Overestimating the Benefits of Emission Reduction Measures?2020In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 12, no 3, article id 808Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When people evaluate the environmental impact of both “environmentally” and “non-environmentally” friendly objects, actions, or behavior, their judgement of the total set in combination is lower than the sum of the individual components. The current communication is a personal perspective article that proposes a human cognitive framework that is adopted during evaluations, which consequently results in wrong reasoning and the reinforcement of misconceptions. The framework gives plausible interpretation of the following: (1) “compensatory green beliefs”—the belief that environmentally harmful behavior can be compensated for by friendly actions; (2) the “negative footprint illusion”—the belief that introducing environmentally friendly objects to a set of conventional objects (e.g., energy efficient products or measures) will reduce the environmental impact of the total set; and (3) “rebound effects”—sustainability interventions increase unsustainable behavior directly or indirectly. In this regard, the framework herein proposes that many seemingly different environmentally harmful behaviors may sprout from a common cause, known as the averaging bias. This may have implications for the success of sustainability interventions, or how people are influenced by the marketing of “environmentally friendly” measures or products and policymaking.

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  • 39.
    Khadra, Alaa
    et al.
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Industri och samhälle, Byggteknik.
    Hugosson, Mårten
    Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences.
    Akander, Jan
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building Engineering, Energy Systems and Sustainability Science, Energy Systems and Building Technology.
    Myhren, Jonn Are
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Industri och samhälle, Byggteknik.
    Development of a Weight Factor Method for Sustainability Decisions in Building Renovation: Case Study Using Renobuild2020In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 12, no 17, article id 7194Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Energy efficiency investments have become strategically important for the European Union. In particular, energy efficient renovation and investment in the existing building stock have become major challenges. Renovation of a building should involve a holistic and integrated design process, which considers all aspects of sustainability. The aim of this work is to suggest a mathematical model that weighs economic, social and ecological aspects into a measure that supports housing owners/decision makers to find the optimal renovation alternative from their perspective, taking factors such as budget, energy consumption, etc. into consideration. Multi-criteria decision-making (MCDM) concerns structuring and solving multiple-criteria decision problems. MCDM has become popular in energy planning as it enables the decision maker to pay attention to all the criteria available and make the appropriate decision as per the priority of the criteria. In this study, the concept is introduced based on economic, social and ecological aspects assessed during a renovation project. A pedagogical example illustrates the suggested numerical system for comparing different renovation alternatives. The suggested method will facilitate decision-making processes in renovation projects and will allow decision makers to choose the best renovation alternatives that are in line with their business ideas and principles.

  • 40.
    Korkeakunnas, Tea
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Heiden, Marina
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Lohela Karlsson, Malin
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research. Sweden;Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences—Health Services Research, Uppsala University, SE-751 22 Uppsala, Sweden;Centre for Clinical Research, Region Västmanland—Uppsala University, Hospital of Västmanland, SE-721 89 Vasteras, Sweden.
    Rambaree, Komalsingh
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Criminology, Social Work.
    Managers’ Perceptions of Telework in Relation to Work Environment and Performance2023In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 15, no 7, article id 5845Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study aimed to investigate managers’ perceptions of telework in relation to the work environment and the performance of their organizations. It was grounded on interviews with 17 managers from public and private organizations in Sweden using a phenomenographic research approach. The managers had experience in leading employees who teleworked, and their contact information was provided by the organizations. The results showed that managers perceived that telework led to more focus on delivery at work. When telework enabled working undisturbed and getting more work done, employees started to question the need to come to the workplace. Further, some employees changed their behaviors at the workplace; they tended to close their office doors to avoid distractions. Others valued social activities when working at the workplace. Managers also reported that telework could make small close-working teams even closer, but they could lose contact with others outside the teams. In addition, telework led to quicker but less informed decisions, which may benefit productivity in the short term but not in the long term. The findings of the study highlight managers’ perspectives on the consequences of telework in an organization, which is important for maintaining organizational sustainability.

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  • 41.
    Krishnan, Reshmy
    et al.
    Research Centre, Muscat College, Bowsher Street, Bowsher, Muscat 112, Oman.
    Nair, Sarachandran
    Research Centre, Muscat College, Bowsher Street, Bowsher, Muscat 112, Oman.
    Saamuel, Baby Sam
    Knowledge Oman, Muscat 113, Oman.
    Justin, Sheeba
    Research Centre, Muscat College, Bowsher Street, Bowsher, Muscat 112, Oman.
    Iwendi, Celestine
    School of Creative Technologies, University of Bolton, Bolton BL3 5AB, UK.
    Biamba, Cresantus
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Educational sciences, Educational science.
    Ibeke, Ebuka
    School of Creative and Cultural Business, Robert Gordon University, Aberdeen AB10 7AQ, UK.
    Smart Analysis of Learners Performance Using Learning Analytics for Improving Academic Progression: A Case Study Model2022In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 14, no 6, article id 3378Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the current COVID-19 pandemic era, Learning Management Systems (LMS) are commonly used in e-learning for various learning activities in Higher Education. Learning Analytics (LA) is an emerging area of LMS, which plays a vital role in tracking and storing learners’ activities in the online environment in Higher Education. LA treats the collections of students’ digital footprints and evaluates this data to improve teaching and learning quality. LA measures the analysis and reports learners’ data and their activities to predict decisions on every tier of the education system. This promising area, which both teachers and students can use during this pandemic outbreak, converges LA, Artificial Intelligence, and Human-Centered Design in data visualization techniques, semantic and educational data mining techniques, feature data extraction, etc. Different learning activities of learners for each course are analyzed with the help of LA plug-ins. The progression of learners can be monitored and predicted with the help of this intelligent analysis, which aids in improving the academic progress of each learner in a secured manner. The Object-Oriented Programming course and Data Communication Network are used to implement our case studies and to collect the analysis reports. Two plug-ins, local and log store plug-ins, are added to the sample course, and reports are observed. This research collected and monitored the data of the activities each students are involved in. This analysis provides the distribution of access to contents from which the number of active students and students’ activities can be inferred. This analysis provides insight into how many assignment submissions and quiz submissions were on time. The hits distribution is also provided in the analytical chart. Our findings show that teaching methods can be improved based on these inferences as it reflects the students’ learning preferences, especially during this COVID-19 era. Furthermore, each student’s academic progression can be marked and planned in the department.

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  • 42.
    La Fleur, Lina
    et al.
    Division of Energy Systems, Department of Management and Engineering, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Rohdin, Patrik
    Division of Energy Systems, Department of Management and Engineering, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Moshfegh, Bahram
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Energy system. Division of Energy Systems, Department of Management and Engineering, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Energy use and perceived indoor environment in a Swedish multifamily building before and after major renovation2018In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 10, no 3, article id 766Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Improved energy efficiency in the building sector is a central goal in the European Union and renovation of buildings can significantly improve both energy efficiency and indoor environment. This paper studies the perception of indoor environment, modelled indoor climate and heat demand in a building before and after major renovation. The building was constructed in 1961 and renovated in 2014. Insulation of the façade and attic and new windows reduced average U-value from 0.54 to 0.29 W/m2·K. A supply and exhaust ventilation system with heat recovery replaced the old exhaust ventilation. Heat demand was reduced by 44% and maximum supplied heating power was reduced by 38.5%. An on-site questionnaire indicates that perceived thermal comfort improved after the renovation, and the predicted percentage dissatisfied is reduced from 23% to 14% during the heating season. Overall experience with indoor environment is improved. A sensitivity analysis indicates that there is a compromise between thermal comfort and energy use in relation to window solar heat gain, internal heat generation and indoor temperature set point. Higher heat gains, although reducing energy use, can cause problems with high indoor temperatures, and higher indoor temperature might increase thermal comfort during heating season but significantly increases energy use. © 2018 by the authors.

  • 43.
    Ljunggren Söderman, Maria
    et al.
    Division of Environmental Systems Analysis, Department of Energy and Environment, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden; IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Eriksson, Ola
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Environmental engineering.
    Björklund, Anna
    Division of Environmental Strategies Research, Department of Sustainable Development, Environmental Sciences and Engineering, School of Architecture and Built Environment, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Östblom, Göran
    National Institute of Economic Research, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Ekvall, Tomas
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Finnveden, Göran
    Division of Environmental Strategies Research, Department of Sustainable Development, Environmental Sciences and Engineering, School of Architecture and Built Environment, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Arushanyan, Yevgeniya
    Division of Environmental Strategies Research, Department of Sustainable Development, Environmental Sciences and Engineering, School of Architecture and Built Environment, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sundqvist, Jan-Olov
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Integrated economic and environmental assessment of waste policy instruments2016In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 8, no 5, article id 411Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The need for new policy instruments supporting the on-going transition from end-of-pipe waste treatment to resource management has been recognized in European policy. Instruments need to be carefully assessed before implementation to promote the desired changes and avoid problem shifting. Mathematical models may assist policy makers in such assessments. This paper presents a set of soft-linked models for assessing the economic and environmental impacts of policy instruments for both the prevention and management of waste and discusses its strengths and limitations. Consisting of (1) a macro-economic model, (2) a systems engineering model for waste management and (3) a life cycle assessment model for waste management, the set is primarily suited to assessing market-based instruments and environmental regulations. Considerable resources were needed for developing and using the set, and there are clear limits as to what can be addressed. However, if only one of the models had been used, neither the range of instruments nor the scope of impacts would have been possible to cover. Furthermore, soft-linked models allow many disciplines to contribute within one harmonized framework. Such integrated assessments may become increasingly useful for continuing the implementation of policy for sustainable governance of society’s material resources. © 2016 by the authors.

  • 44.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. Organisational Sustainability, Ltd., Cardiff, UK.
    Proposing a Definition and a Framework of Organisational Sustainability: A Review of Efforts and a Survey of Approaches to Change2018In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 10, no 4, article id 1157Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Organisations (civil society, companies, and public-sector organisations (PSOs)) have beeninstrumental in driving sustainability. In the last five years, there has been an increasing interest inorganisational sustainability, where the importance of sustainability’s dimensions depends on anorganisation’s nature and purpose. A large body of literature on organisational sustainability hasfocused on companies, followed by education institutions, in particular higher education. Limited,yet increasing, attention has been directed to PSOs and other civil society organisations. Althoughthere have been some attempts to define a sustainable organisation, there is still a need to defineand establish the principles of how organisations can address and contribute to sustainability.The sustainability efforts in the different types of organisations were reviewed and then analysedin this paper by using hermeneutics. This was complemented with a survey on sustainabilitychanges. The survey was sent to a database of 1574 contacts from different organisations. In addition,106 anonymous links were sent out. From the total list of emails, 118 full responses were obtained,with 39 from civil society (37 from higher education and 2 NGOs), 66 corporations, and 13 PSOs.This research distils the key system elements of the efforts in each of the organisations in order tosynthesise and propose a definition and a conceptual framework of organisational sustainability.These can help organisations understand where their efforts are and how they could better embedsustainability into their systems, thus contributing to the well-being of societies and the environmentfor this generation and future ones.

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  • 45.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. Organisational Sustainability Ltd., Cardiff, UK.
    Barreiro-Gen, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Lozano, Francisco J.
    Escuela de Ingeniería y Ciencias, Tecnológico de Monterrey, Campus Toluca, San Antonio Buenavista, Toluca de Lerdo, Mexico.
    Sammalisto, Kaisu
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Teaching Sustainability in European Higher Education Institutions: Assessing the Connections between Competences and Pedagogical Approaches2019In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 11, no 6, article id 1602Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There has been considerable progress in the incorporation of sustainable development (SD) into higher education institutions’ curricula. This has included research on competences for SD and pedagogical approaches used; however, there has been limited research on the connection between how pedagogical approaches are used and how they may develop sustainability competences. A survey was developed, based on the ‘connecting sustainable development pedagogical approaches to competences’ framework, to investigate sustainability being taught, sustainability competences developed, and pedagogical approaches used in European higher education institutions. The survey was sent to a database of more than 4000 contacts from which 390 complete responses (9.80%) were obtained. The results show that the social dimension was the least addressed at 18% of responses, while the economic, environmental, and cross-cutting dimensions were addressed almost equally. The correlation analyses showed a relation between the contribution to sustainability and the strength of competences, and between the strength of competences and the strength of pedagogical approaches. The results from the survey helped to update the theoretical framework, which provides a more precise perspective on how sustainability competences can be better developed in class, and how to better develop all the sustainability competences

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  • 46.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. Organisational Sustainability, Ltd., Cardiff, UK.
    Merrill, Michelle Y.
    Independent Researcher and Consultant, Capitola, CA, USA.
    Sammalisto, Kaisu
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Ceulemans, Kim
    Toulouse Business School, University of Toulouse, Toulouse, France.
    Lozano, Francisco J.
    Escuela de Ingeniería y Ciencias, Tecnologico de Monterrey, Monterrey, Mexico.
    Connecting Competences and Pedagogical Approaches for Sustainable Development in Higher Education: A Literature Review and Framework Proposal2017In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 9, no 10, article id 1889Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research into and practice of Higher Education for Sustainable Development (HESD) have been increasing during the last two decades. These have focused on providing sustainability education to future generations of professionals. In this context, there has been considerable progress in the incorporation of SD in universities’ curricula. Most of these efforts have focussed on the design and delivery of sustainability-oriented competences. Some peer-reviewed articles have proposed different pedagogical approaches to better deliver SD in these courses; however, there has been limited research on the connection between how courses are delivered (pedagogical approaches) and how they may affect sustainability competences. This paper analyses competences and pedagogical approaches, using hermeneutics to connect these in a framework based on twelve competences and twelve pedagogical approaches found in the literature. The framework connects the course aims to delivery in HESD by highlighting the connections between pedagogical approaches and competences in a matrix structure. The framework is aimed at helping educators in creating and updating their courses to provide a more complete, holistic, and systemic sustainability education to future leaders, decision makers, educators, and change agents. To better develop mind-sets and actions of future generations, we must provide students with a complete set of sustainability competences.

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  • 47.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. Organisational Sustainability Ltd., Cardiff, UK.
    Suzuki, Masachika
    Graduate School of Global Environmental Studies, Sophia University, Tokyo, Japan.
    Carpenter, Angela
    Organisational Sustainability Ltd., Cardiff, UK; School of Earth and Environment, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK.
    Tyunina, Olga
    Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Chiba, Japan.
    An analysis of the contribution of Japanese Business terms to Corporate Sustainability: learnings from the ‘looking-glasses’ of the East to the West and vice versa2017In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 9, no 2, article id 188Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the last decade, there has been increasing research on Corporate Sustainability, whereby most of such research was undertaken in the Western world. This paper is aimed at analysing the contribution of Japanese Business terms to Corporate Sustainability. The paper analyses, using Grounded Theory, 28 Japanese business terms through a Corporate Sustainability framework based on the four dimensions of sustainability (economic, environmental, social, and time), the company system (operations and processes, strategy and management, organisational systems, procurement and marketing, and assessment and communication), and stakeholders (internal, interconnecting, and external). The underpinning principles of the Japanese business terms provide complementary approaches to Western views on corporate sustainability by offering a more holistic perspective by linking the company system and its stakeholders to the four dimensions of sustainability. The paper proposes that Corporate Sustainability can learn from Japanese business approaches through: (1) the interaction and alignment of the factory, the firm, and inter-firm network; (2) the relationships between management and employees; (3) the inter-linkages between the company system elements; and (4) how Japanese companies remained competitive, even under the stress of a long-term major economic crisis. However, the analysis indicates that the relationship with external stakeholders and communicating with them through assessment and reporting is lacking in Japanese business management practice. Japanese businesses and their management can also learn from the Corporate Sustainability of the West by: (1) considering the four dimensions of sustainability and how they interact; (2) taking a holistic and systemic approach to Corporate Sustainability; (3) engaging in more Corporate Sustainability research; and (4) making Corporate Sustainability part of a company’s culture and activities. Businesses in the East and the West need to recognise that they can both contribute to making the world more sustainable by learning from each other’s approaches on Corporate Sustainability and adapting them to their own contexts. 

  • 48.
    Lättman, Katrin
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health, Psychology and Sports Sciences, Psychology.
    Otsuka, Noriko
    ILS Research gGmbH.
    Sustainable Development of Urban Mobility through Active Travel and Public Transport2024In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 16, no 2, article id 534Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 49.
    Macassa, Gloria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Public Health and Sport Science, Public Health Science.
    Public Perceptions of Sustainable Physical Activity and Active Transportation: A Pilot Qualitative Study in Gävle and Maputo2023In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 15, no 21, article id 15354Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sustainable physical activity and active transportation are important for achieving sustainable societies as well as for achieving the sustainable development goal of health and wellbeing for all. The main objective of this pilot study was to investigate the general public’s perceptions of sustainable physical activity and active transportation in the cities of Gävle (Sweden) and Maputo (Mozambique). Twelve semi-structured asynchronous e-mail interviews were subjected to content analysis. Findings indicated that participants knew what physical activity is and that they related it to general health and wellbeing. However, the majority were not familiar with the meaning of “sustainable physical activity” or “active transportation.” Furthermore, they did not know about the relationship between sustainable development and physical activity. The few participants who knew about active transportation said that it could contribute to reducing greenhouse gases. They mentioned barriers to active transportation in their respective cities, however, ranging from laziness (in the case of Gävle) to cultural norms and associations such as linking the use of active transportation to lacking the means to buy a motor vehicle (in Maputo). There is a need to integrate sustainability literacy with the already existing health and public health literacies to provide this knowledge to the general population. To this end, rather than creating new educational programmes for the public, the existing materials can be adjusted to include aspects of sustainability and sustainable health behaviours and lifestyles.

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  • 50.
    Macassa, Gloria
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Public Health and Sport Science, Public Health Science.
    Rashid, Mamunur
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Public Health and Sport Science, Public Health Science.
    Backlund Rambaree, Brita
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Criminology, Social Work.
    Chowdhury, Ehsanul
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Business and Economic Studies, Business administration.
    Corporate Social Responsibility Reporting for Stakeholders’ Health and Wellbeing in the Food and Beverage Industry: A Case Study of a Multinational Company2022In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 14, no 9, article id 4879Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The concept of corporate social responsibility (CSR) used to be seen as a social obligation of businesses to make decisions and take responsible action in accordance with the goals and values of the society. The concept is today understood as the continuing commitment by businesses to behave ethically and contribute to economic development while improving the quality of life of the workforce and their families as well as the local community and society at large. This study aimed to apply Chowdhury and co-authors’ framework to the Unilever Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) Content Index 2020 to explore the feasibility of the framework as well as identify potential challenges related to its use in the field of public health. Findings show that the framework is suitable for analysing CSR reporting on activities aimed to promote internal and external stakeholders’ health and wellbeing from a public health perspective. A greater number of GRI disclosures reported by Unilever related to external stakeholders’ health and wellbeing than to activities impacting internal stakeholders. Further research should aim at testing the framework in other types of business organizations across other types of industries.

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