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  • 1.
    Kihlgren, Annica
    et al.
    School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Sunvisson, Helena
    School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Ziegert, Kristina
    School of Social and Health Sciences, Halmstad University, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Mamhidir, Anna-Greta
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Referrals to emergency departments: the processes and factors that influence decision-making among community nurses2014In: Open Journal of Nursing, ISSN 2162-5336, E-ISSN 2162-5344, Vol. 4, no 5, p. 366-374Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to describe the basis on which municipal care registered nurses (RN) make decisions and their experiences when referring older persons from nursing homes to emergency departments (EDs). RNS’ in the community are to ensure that older adults receive good care quality in nursing home. This study used a descriptive design with a qualitative content analysis. The analysis of the data from the 13 interviews revealed one theme “Shared responsibilities in the best interests of the older person reduce feelings of insufficiency”. The content was formulated, which revealed the RNs’ feelings, reasoning and factors influencing them and their actions in the decision-making situation, before the patients were referred to an emergency department. Complex illnesses, non-adapted organizations, considerations about what was good and right in order to meet the older person’s needs, taking account of her/his life-world, health, well-being and best interests were reported. Co-worker competencies and open dialogues in the “inner circle” were crucial for the nurses’ confidence in the decision. Hesitation to refer was associated with previous negative reactions from ED professionals. The RN sometimes express that they lacked medical knowledge and were uncertain how to judge the acute illness or changes. Access to the “outer circle”, i.e. physicians and hospital colleagues, was necessary to counteract feelings of insecurity about referrals. When difficult decisions have to be made, not only medical facts but also relationships are of importance. To strengthen the RNs’ and staff members’ competence by means of education seems to be important for avoiding unnecessary referrals. Guidelines and work routine need to be more transparent and referrals due to the lack of resources are not only wasteful but can worsen the older persons’ health.

  • 2.
    Kjällman Alm, Annika
    et al.
    Avdelningen för omvårdnad, Mittuniversitetet, Sundsvall.
    Danielsson, Sandra
    Region Jämtland/Härjedalen.
    Kristiansen, Lisbeth Porskrog
    Avdelningen för omvårdnad, Mittuniversitetet, Sundsvall.
    Non-pharmalogical interventions towards behavioural and psychological symptoms of  dementia — an integrated literature review2018In: Open Journal of Nursing, ISSN 2162-5336, E-ISSN 2162-5344, no 8, p. 434-447Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this integrated literature review was to identify and examine effectiveness of non-pharmacological interventions towards BPSD. Database searches were documented following the PRISMA flow diagram and included papers were judged by the researchers using the SAHTAASS protocol. Coding of the papers was carried out using Polit and Beck matrix for literature review. It was concluded that several non-pharmacological interventions showed a positive influence on BPSD such as stimulating interventions, social and personalized activities and physical exercise. Also, education/training of healthcare professionals and equipment in form of a structured BPSD protocol resulted in decreased BPSD.

  • 3.
    Kleebthong, Duangkaew
    et al.
    Avdelningen för omvårdnad, Mittuniversitetet, Sundsvall.
    Chareonsuk, Sukjai
    Boromarajonani College of Nursing, Chakriraj, Thailand.
    Kristiansen, Lisbeth
    Avdelningen för omvårdnad, Mittuniversitetet, Sundsvall.
    Thai psychiatric nurses' experiences and perceptions of the professional role when caring for older people displaying depressive symptoms2018In: Open Journal of Nursing, ISSN 2162-5336, E-ISSN 2162-5344, no 1, p. 45-59Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to describe Thai psychiatric nurses’ experiences and perceptions of their professional role when caring for older people whom displayed symptoms of clinical depression. Methods: A qualitative descriptive research design was used. Thirteen psychiatric nurses working in the field of mental health and psychiatric nursing at a rural district hospital were purposively included. The data were collected through in-depth, face to face interviews and analyzed using qualitative latent content analysis. Results: All participants were female, and the mean age was 43 years, and the mean experience of caring for mentally ill patients was 8.3 years. The psychiatric nurses’ experiences and perceptions of their professional role were mirrored in the following themes: 1) managing a central role in the care of the patients; 2) conflicting interests between the professional needs of caregiving and other requests; and 3) being compassionate beyond the profession. Conclusion: The psychiatric nurses were challenged by the complexity of the caregiving situations and the partners involved in the process of caring for older people with depression. Professionally, the psychiatric nurses played an important role in preventive care and managerial work. They underwent stress under the influence of stakeholders, but they also contributed to the holistic patient care. Health service authorities may use these results to develop plans for psychiatric nurses in managing a central role and in advocating for holistic care to mitigate the influence of stakeholders to enhance quality of caring for older individuals with depression.

  • 4.
    Kristiansen, Lisbeth
    Avdelningen för omvårdnad, Mittuniversitetet, Sundsvall.
    Wanting a Life in Decency!: A Qualitative Study from Experienced Electric Wheelchairs Users’ perspective2018In: Open Journal of Nursing, ISSN 2162-5336, E-ISSN 2162-5344, Vol. 8, no 7, p. 419-433Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The functionality and the safety of the electric wheelchairs were essential for users’ everyday life. Some evidence indicated that the wheelchair Per Se highly influenced users’ occupational life, their personal identity and social life; further, the wheelchair became an extension of the body and more than a technical device. Besides, there was still both environmental and self-efficacy or/and mental health factors obstacles for full social participation. Even so, there was to some extent stigma related to being a wheelchair user. There was a need to reflect users’ perspective on being depended on electric wheelchair. The aim, accordingly, was to describe and to get a deeper insight into electric wheelchairs users’ perspective and experiences of utilizing this device; a qualitative design with an inductive approach was used. Method: Qualitative latent and interpretative content analysis [1] [2] was used after repeated face-to-face semi-structured interviews with three experienced Swedish electric wheelchair users during the autumn 2017. Findings: The findings showed a high degree of dependability of the assistants that supported the users, and of the quality of that working relationship. The findings were formulated, abstracted and interpreted in several steps. It showed one theme of meaning: “Living in a space shifting between potential violation of or respect for human dignity”. Conclusion: The study showed that electric wheelchair users were relatively content with their lives as well as with their devices in turns of mobility and accessibility, but the meaning of their narrations showed a life at constant risk of having the respect of human rights and human respect violated. Besides, the importance of having access to good and high quality devices, good staffing, and environmental support, all in concordance with human rights, the clinical and practical implications of this study narrows down to a question of encountering the other person as a whole and worthy individual.

  • 5.
    Kristiansen, Lisbeth Porskrog
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Lif, Ulrika
    Mid Sweden University, Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Asklund, Helene
    Mid Sweden University, Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Experiences on Participation in Literary Activities : Intellectual Stimuli Empower People with Mental Health Problems2017In: Open Journal of Nursing, ISSN 2162-5336, E-ISSN 2162-5344, Vol. 7, no 11, p. 1307-1323, article id 80506Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Some research acknowledges engagement in creative and literary activities as constructively impacting rehabilitation and recovery. Nevertheless, there is a deficit of literature describing experiences of participation in literary activities. This study examined how members of a non-profit association for mental health, with experiences of mental problems or illnesses, experienced group-based literary activities facilitated of a bi-disciplinary research team during one semester. This study held a constructive/naturalistic design and used a qualitative methodology with a latent analysis to describe how participants experienced literary activities (creative writing, reading and conversations about published and own written poetry and prose texts). Both individual and focus-group interviews were performed early 2014. Despite previous negative experiences, the findings showed that the participants perceived the literary activities empowering. Four categories were created: Presumptions of personal literacy, leadership role, participants’ role, and literacy development. These were abstracted and interpreted into three themes: Identifying a reading and writing self-image, challenging and redefining one’s reading and writing identity, and strengthening one’s intellectual and humanistic capacity. Literary activities seemed to positively change the participants’ attitudes towards writing and reading, and also enhanced their literacy skills. We argue that literacy skills are interconnected with health literacy. Involvement of literary activities into rehabilitation in mental health practice may be beneficial for some groups, and merits further studies.

  • 6.
    Mentsen Ness, Tove
    et al.
    Department of Nursing, Mid-Sweden University, Östersund, Sweden; Department of Health Sciences, Nord-Trøndelag University College, Namsos, Norway.
    Hellzén, Per Ove
    Department of Nursing, Mid-Sweden University, Östersund, Sweden.
    Enmarker, Ingela
    Department of Nursing, Mid-Sweden University, Östersund, Sweden; Department of Health Sciences, Nord-Trøndelag University College, Namsos, Norway; Centre of Care Research, Mid-Norway, Steinkjer, Norway.
    The experience of nurses providing home nursing care to oldest old persons living alone in rural areas - an interview study2015In: Open Journal of Nursing, ISSN 2162-5336, E-ISSN 2162-5344, Vol. 5, no 4, p. 336-344, article id 55301Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The rapidly increasing population of older persons worldwide, and the fact that the majority of them want to continue living in their own homes, mean there is a growing focus on home based care. Because of this, it is necessary to increase the number of studies, including rural areas, as earlier studies are sparse. Rural areas cannot be seen as a homogeneous phenomenon, meaning more research is needed to increase knowledge about cultural differences in rural areas. The aim of this study was therefore to describe registered nurses’ experiences of providing home nursing care to oldest old persons living alone in rural areas. A sample of 15 registered nurses in rural South Sami areas was chosen for this study, 13 women and 2 men. Narrative interviews were con- ducted, and qualitative content analysis was used to interpret the data. The analysis revealed four themes and eight subthemes in addition to a core-theme. The latent meaning of the themes “Feeling responsible”, “Trying to accommodate”, “Being challenged” and “Feeling significant” formed the core-theme: contradictions between nurses’ ideals of being professional and the reality faced in rural home nursing care with close social relationships. The findings in this study showed that the experiences of providing home nursing care in rural areas to oldest old persons were multi- faceted and altering, as well as emotionally and socially contradictory.

  • 7.
    Moe, Aud
    et al.
    Faculty of Health and Science, Nord-Trøndelag University College, Levanger, Norway; Department of Health Sciences, Mid Sweden University, Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Ekker, Knut
    Faculty of Agricuclture and Information Technology, Nord-Trøndelag University College, Steinkjer, Norway.
    Enmarker, Ingela
    Faculty of Health Science, Nord-Trøndelag University Collage, Namsos, Norway.
    A description of resilience for Norwegian home-living chronically ill oldest old persons2013In: Open Journal of Nursing, ISSN 2162-5336, E-ISSN 2162-5344, Vol. 3, no 2, article id 32480Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Despite worsening health the chronically ill oldest older persons have expressed feelings of inner strength, which can be understood as resilience. The objective was to describe and compare the characteristics of resilience in two different age groups of chronically ill oldest older persons living at home and who needed help from home nursing care. Design: Cross-sectional design was used to describe and compare the resilience qualities between the two age groups. Methods: The inclusion criteria were 80 years or older, living at home with chronic disease, receiving help from home nursing care, and with the capacity to be interviewed. A sample of 120 oldest older women (n = 79) and men (n = 41) separated in two age groups, aged 80 - 89 and 90+ years, participated in the study. Resilience characteristics were measured by Resilience Scale. Results: The whole group of oldest older people was vulnerable in relation to the characteristics of perseverance, self-reliance, and existential aloneness. Despite reduced physical health they reported a meaningful life, and equanimity. Even if there were no significant differences between the age groups among the oldest older persons in the characteristics of Resilience Scale (RS), in the characteristic of meaning there was a tendency of interaction between age and how much help from home nursing care the participants received. Conclusions: It is important to focus on the individual aging and the risk of developing illness and disabilities rather than focusing on chronologic age. Possessing meaning in life and equanimity may be strengths to meet challenges through illness and growing older.

  • 8.
    Myren, Gunn-Eva
    et al.
    Centre for Care Research, Mid-Norway, Steinkjer, Norway; Department of Nursing Science, Mid-Sweden University, Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Enmarker, Ingela
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science. Centre for Care Research, Mid-Norway, Steinkjer, Norway.
    Hellzen, Ove
    Department of Nursing Science, Mid-Sweden University, Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Saur, Ellen
    Department of Education, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
    The Influence of Place on Everyday Life: Observations of Persons with Dementia in Regular Day Care and at the Green Care Farm2017In: Open Journal of Nursing, ISSN 2162-5336, E-ISSN 2162-5344, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 261-278Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Day care services for persons with dementia are becoming an important aspect of community services. Place, therefore, becomes vital concerning how such establishments are organized regarding both the physical and social environment and the programs that are offered. The aim of this study was to describe the influence of place on everyday life in two different organized daycare services for persons with dementia. Based on observations and informal conversations with persons with dementia and staff members at a green care farm and a regular day care, we used an inductive manifest content analysis. The analysis reveals a main category: enabling and collaboration in daily life. The results are discussed in light of Goffman’s analysis of the structures of social encounters from the perspective of the dramatic performance. The main findings in this study involve how place contributes to enabling activities and collaboration between participants and staff, as it influences participants’ ability to achieve an active or passive role in everyday life at the day care services.

  • 9.
    Ness, Tove Mentsen
    et al.
    Faculty of Health and Sciences, Nord-Trøndelag University College, Namsos, Norway; Department of Health Science, Mid-Sweden University, Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Enmarker, Ingela
    Faculty of Health and Sciences, Nord-Trøndelag University College, Namsos, Norway; Centre for Care Research, Mid-Norway, Steinkjer, Norway.
    Hellzén, Ove
    Faculty of Health and Sciences, Nord-Trøndelag University; Centre for Care Research, Mid-Norway, Steinkjer, Norway College, Namsos, Norway; Department of Health Science, Mid-Sweden University, Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Experiences of being old and receiving home nursing care. Older South Sami narrations of their experiences - An interview study2013In: Open Journal of Nursing, ISSN 2162-5336, E-ISSN 2162-5344, Vol. 3, no 1, article id 28575Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Sami people who are the natives of Scandinavia are not a homogeneous group. They consist of different groups of Sami populations of which the South Sami population are one small group. For the South Sami this means a problem; they have to struggle against a general ignorance about the Sami people and culture, which also may affect received home nursing care. The aim of this study is to describe individual South Sami experiences of being old and receiving home nursing care. A sample of 10 older persons with South Sami background was chosen for this study. Narrative interviews were conducted and qualitative content analysis was used to identify and categorize primary patterns in data. The experience of being an old person with South Sami background who receives home nursing care was understood through the use of the following four themes developed from the informants’ own narratives: “Experience of losses in life”; “Feelings of being less valued”; “Feelings of gratitude”; and “Experience of meaning in daily life as old”. The main finding is that the South Sami population still is exposed to an ongoing subtle colonisation. Therefore, it is important to prepare and teach nurses who work in the South Sami area in cultural care, traditional values and beliefs specific to the South Sami population.

  • 10.
    Nordbøe, Christianne
    et al.
    Faculty of Nursing and Health Sciences, Nord University, Levanger, Norway.
    Enmarker, Ingela
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science. Centre for Care Research, Mid-Norway, Nord University, Steinkjer, Norway.
    The Benefits of Person-Centred Clinical Supervision in Municipal Healthcare - Employees’ Experience2017In: Open Journal of Nursing, ISSN 2162-5336, E-ISSN 2162-5344, Vol. 7, no 5, p. 548-560Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Satisfied employees in healthcare services who have opportunities to develop their professional competence by reflecting on professional challenges play an important role in the quality of care. The aim of the present study was to describe the employees’ experience of the benefits of participating in a person-centred clinical supervision setting. The supervision, guided by a professional supervisor, was carried out with a group of six day- and night-shift municipal healthcare professionals for a period of four months during their mandatory work hours. Data were obtained from written individual evaluations and group interviews shortly after the last session and again twelve months later. The results showed that the participants experienced that their internal resources and coping skills had been strengthened by the supervision. They developed abilities to meet the challenges more constructively than before. New understandings gave them the opportunity to alternative actions in practice. Further intervention studies of person-centred clinical supervision must focus on such clinical outcomes as patient safety and professional development.

  • 11.
    Olsen, Rose Mari
    et al.
    Faculty of Health and Science, Nord-Trøndelag University College, Namsos, Norway.
    Hellzén, Ove
    Department of Health Sciences, Mid-Sweden University, Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Skotnes, Liv Heidi
    Department of Medicine, Division of Geriatrics, Nord-Trøndelag Health Trust, Namsos, Norway.
    Enmarker, Ingela
    Faculty of Health and Science, Nord-Trøndelag University College, Namsos, Norway; Centre for Care Research Mid-Norway, Steinkjer, Norway.
    Content of nursing discharge notes: associations with patient and transfer characteristics2012In: Open Journal of Nursing, ISSN 2162-5336, E-ISSN 2162-5344, Vol. 2, no 3, article id 23179Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In situations of care transfer of older people from hospital to home care at discharge, exchanging relevant and necessary information about the patient’s health status and individual needs are of importance to ensure continuity and appropriate nursing follow-up care.

    Objective: The objectives of the study were to: 1) examine the content of nurses’ discharge notes of older patients’ discharged from hospital to home care; and 2) investigate the association between the content of discharge notes and characteristics of patient and transfer.

    Methods: The nursing discharge notes of 70 older patients admitted to a geriatric unit and a general medicine ward at a local hospital in central Norway were analysed. The discharge notes were structured in accordance with the Well-being, Integrity, Prevention, and Safety (VIPS) model. Mean, standard deviations, and independent sample t-tests were performed to show and examine differences in use of VIPS keywords in relation to patient and transfer characteristics. To examine if use of VIPS keywords could be predicted by patient and transfer characteristics, linear multiple regression analyses were used.

    Results: Significant differences for mean scores on used VIPS keywords in the discharge note were found for gender, age, and medical department facility. While gender and medical department facility were significant predictors of mental related keywords in the discharge note, medical department facility was a significant predictor of physical related keywords.

    Conclusions: The result of this study indicate that documentation of patient status in the nursing discharge note of older patients transferred from hospital to home care is incomplete and are influenced by patient and transfer characteristics. In order to ensure continuity and appropriate nursing follow-up care, we emphasize the need for a more comprehensive approach to older patients, and that this must be reflected in the nursing discharge note.

  • 12.
    Solum Myren, Gunn Eva
    et al.
    Centre for Care Research, Mid-Norway, Steinkjer, Norway; Faculty of Health Sciences, Nord-Trøndelag University College, Namsos, Norway; Department of Nursing Science, Mid-Sweden University, Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Enmarker, Ingela
    Centre for Care Research, Mid-Norway, Steinkjer, Norway; Faculty of Health Sciences, Nord-Trøndelag University College, Namsos, Norway.
    Saur, Ellen
    Department of Education, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
    Hellzén, Per Ove
    Department of Nursing Science, Mid-Sweden University, Sundsvall, Sweden.
    “Being Free Like a Bird”―The Meaning of Being an Informal Caregiver for Persons with Dementia Who Are Receiving Day Care Services2015In: Open Journal of Nursing, ISSN 2162-5336, E-ISSN 2162-5344, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 109-119, article id 53858Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Respite care in the form of day care is one of the several respite services that aims to provide temporary relief to informal caregivers from their responsibilities of caring for a person with dementia. The purpose of this study was to illuminate the meaning of being an informal caregiver for a person with dementia living at home and receiving day care services. Narrative interviews were conducted, and data were analyzed using the phenomenological hermeneutic method. Two main themes emerged: “Living with limitations in everyday life” and “Having a life besides being a caregiver”. The comprehensive understanding suggested living with a person with dementia, changes and influences the informal caregiver’s life through a set of new roles and a new way of living and thinking. The result is discussed in light of Goffman’s analysis of the structures of social encounters from the perspective of the dramatic performance.

  • 13.
    Sundin, Rakel
    et al.
    Caring Sciences, Municipality in Söderhamn, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Annika
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Section of Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Waage-Andrée, Rebecca
    Department of Endocrinology, Gävle Hospital, Gävle, Sweden.
    Björn, Catrine
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Section of Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Centre for Research & Development, Uppsala University/Region Gävleborg, Gävle, Sweden; Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Nurses’ Perceptions of Patient Safety in Community Mental Health Settings: A Qualitative Study2015In: Open Journal of Nursing, ISSN 2162-5336, E-ISSN 2162-5344, Vol. 5, no 4, p. 387-396Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mental health care has moved from hospital settings to community mental health settings, and there is a need to explore the perceptions of patient safety among registered nurses working in this field. Patient safety is to include everyone and to be the goal in all aspects of health care. The aim of the study was to explore registered nurses’ perceptions of patient safety in community mental health settings for people with serious mental illness. The study was qualitative and descriptive in nature and interviews were carried out during spring 2012, with seven registered nurses working in community mental health settings for people with serious mental illness in five municipalities in the middle of Sweden. The sampling was purposive and data were analysed using qualitative content analysis. The findings showed that the registered nurses understood patient safety as providing support to people with serious mental illness in regaining and maintaining health through good treatment and respecting self-determination and avoiding coercion. The terms of daily living in small community mental health settings within the a large community health care organization, communication, sufficient knowledge of psychiatric disabilities among people in the residents’ network, and national laws and regulations, all had implications for patient safety. The registered nurses perceived patient safety as involving a wide range of issues that in other areas of care are more often discussed in terms of quality of care. Determining the boundaries of patient safety in community mental health settings for people with serious mental illness can be a first step in establishing workable routines that ensure safe patient care.

  • 14.
    Valan, Lotha
    et al.
    Department of Nursing, Mid Sweden University, Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Kristiansen, Lisbeth Porskrog
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science.
    Sundin, Karin
    Department of Nursing, Umeå University, Örnsköldsvik, Sweden.
    Jong, Mats
    Department of Nursing, Mid Sweden University, Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Health-Related Internet Information Both Strengthens and Weakens Parents’ Potential for Self-Care: A Mixed-Methods Study on Parents’ Search Patterns2018In: Open Journal of Nursing, ISSN 2162-5336, E-ISSN 2162-5344, Vol. 8, no 10, p. 731-745, article id 88148Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today’s parents belong to the digital generation and regularly use the Internet as a source of information. Parents’ quests for health-related online information comprise an effort to manage symptoms of illness or address questions about child development which may be an expression of self-management or self-care. Purpose: This study aims to describe health and child development related Internet search patterns used by parents of children ages zero to six, and further, how the obtained information was used in contacts with Child Health Care. Design and Methods: A two-step mixed- method approach is used in this study, comprising both a quantitative and a qualitative approach. First, a questionnaire was distributed to parents (n = 800) at 13 health centers in a medium sized county in Sweden. Second, one narrative interview with two parents total was conducted. Descriptive and non-parametric statistics were calculated, and qualitative manifest content analyses were performed. Results: A total of 687 completed the questionnaire, which corresponds to a response rate of 86%. The results show that 97% used the Internet for health-related and developmental child issues. The results show that parents often look at basic tips and the Internet is seen as a fast and accessible forum to obtain information. Parents often initiated their Internet searches using Google search for the specific subject, but the most common and most used website (used by 95% of parents), was the Swedish health site 1177.se. 98.4% of parents evaluated the general information searches they made on the Internet as reliable despite only 31% of the parents checking to see if the websites they used were scientifically based. Parents (81.7%) stated that they wanted their Child Health Nurses (CHN) to give them recommendations for valid websites. Conclusions: The results in this study show that, on the one hand, the Internet could strengthen parental knowledge (support self-care capacity), but, on the other hand, the found information could worry them and increase their anxiety—negatively affected self-care capacity. The parents suggested that the information should be double-checked to establish trust and develop self-care knowledge. Having a good resource to rely on, such as personal contact with a CHN, or using reliable websites seems to strengthen and reassure parents.

  • 15.
    Voraroon, Supaporn
    et al.
    Department of Nursing Sciences, Mid Sweden University, Sundsvall, Sweden; Boromarajonani College of Nursing, Suphanburi, Thailand.
    Meebunmak, Yaowaluck
    Boromarajonani College of Nursing, Ratchaburi, Thailand.
    Enmarker, Ingela
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science. Centre for Care Research Mid-Norway, Steinkjer, Norway.
    Hellzen, Ove
    Department of Nursing Sciences, Mid Sweden University, Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Shareholding Networks for Care in Rural Thailand: Experiences of Older Persons and Their Family Members2017In: Open Journal of Nursing, ISSN 2162-5336, E-ISSN 2162-5344, Vol. 7, p. 318-330Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most members of the older population in Thailand live in rural areas while their children live in cities. With the joint family system separated, elderly Thai persons often have to care for themselves, and opportunities for them to get involved in community care remain limited. In response, the aim of this study was to describe olderpersons’ and their family members’ experiences with shareholding networks for the care of older people in rural Thailand. Paired interviews with five older persons and five of their family members were conducted, and collected data were subjected to content analysis, which yielded results organized around two themes:older persons’ outsider status and disregard for older persons’ individuality.Whereas the theme of outsider status describes shortcomings in healthcare encounters, the theme of disre-gard for individuality describes the lack of engagement of authorities and ca-regivers in older persons’ care. In that sense, the concept of participation emerged as a framework for understanding interviewees’ experiences. Given findings from local authorities, older individuals and theirfamily members should engage in dialogue in order to support healthcare based on shared un-derstanding.

  • 16.
    Voraroon, Supraon
    et al.
    Department of Nursing Sciences, Mid Sweden University, Sundsvall, Sweden; Boromarajonani College of Nursing, Suphanburi, Thailand.
    Hellzén, Ove
    Department of Nursing Sciences, Mid Sweden University, Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Meebunmak, Yaowaluck
    Boromarajonani College of Nursing, Suphanburi, Thailand.
    Enmarker, Ingela
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science. Department of Nursing Sciences, Mid Sweden University, Sundsvall, Sweden; Centre of Care Research, Department of Health Sciences, Nord University, Steinkjer, Norway.
    Older People’s Lived Experiences with Participation in Shareholding Networks for the Care of Older People in Rural Areas of Thailand: A Phenomenological Hermeneutic Study2017In: Open Journal of Nursing, ISSN 2162-5336, E-ISSN 2162-5344, Vol. 7, no 7, p. 875-892Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Older people participating in shareholding networks are exposed to diverse situations, which may be associated with dignity. Aims: This study aimed to illuminate the meaning of lived experiences when participating in shareholding networks for the care of older people in rural areas. Methods: This qualitative study is based on individual interviews. Ten older Thai persons with at least 12 months of lived experiences participating in shareholding networks for older people in rural areas were interviewed. A phenomenological-hermeneutic approach, inspired by Ricoeur, was used to understand the meaning of the narrated text. Findings: The structural analysis resulted in four themes: 1) being satisfied with activities, 2) being valued as important, 3) being frustrated and feeling sad, and 4) being bored and feeling disinterest. The meaning of participation in a shareholding network for the elderly can be understood as a pathway to feelings of confidence and presence of others. Confidence and allowing the presence of others mean facing humanity and sensing vulnerability, because in a trusting relationship the person who gives confidence is susceptible to the other’s betrayal. Conclusion: An individual’s dignity should be a high priority in health and social care strategies. Therefore, it is important for healthcare professionals to initiate a dialogue with the shareholding participants for support and information. The narrations in this study can be used as a basis for developing cooperating care with older people in shareholding network focusing on their needs and dignity.

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