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  • 1.
    Haga, Andreas
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Environmental psychology.
    Eco-label effects in the built environment: does labeling a light source environmentally friendly influence performance and judgement?2018In: SAGE Open, ISSN 2158-2440, E-ISSN 2158-2440, Vol. 8, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Knez, Igor
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Psychology.
    Hjärpe, Daniel
    Bryngelsson, Mari
    Predicting Organizational Citizenship Behavior: The Role of Work-Related Self2019In: SAGE Open, ISSN 2158-2440, E-ISSN 2158-2440, Vol. 9, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim was to investigate the links between work-related identification, conceptualized, and operationalized as the work-related self (WS), and the “good soldier syndrome” (organizational citizenship behavior [OCB]). More precisely, we investigated the relationships between emotional and cognitive components of WS and OCB dimensions of altruism, conscientiousness, courtesy, civic virtue, and sportsmanship. A total of 147 subjects working within the Swedish public sector participated in this study. As hypothesized, WS significantly predicted OCB. A positive association was found between the emotional component of WS and OCB dimensions of altruism, conscientiousness, and civic virtue. This suggests that the “good soldier syndrome” might be, to some extent, accounted for by the psychological mechanisms of work bonding, especially, highlighting the importance of the emotional component of work-related identification. 

  • 3.
    Okenwa-Emegwa, Leah
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Public health science.
    Lawoko, Stephen
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jansson, Bjarne
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Attitudes Toward Physical Intimate Partner Violence Against Women in Nigeria2016In: SAGE Open, ISSN 2158-2440, E-ISSN 2158-2440, Vol. 6, no 4, article id 2158244016667993Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Attitudes toward intimate partner violence (IPV) are known predictors of IPV victimization and perpetration with more women generally believed to justify IPV than men. An understanding of the determinants of justification of IPV may provide information necessary for holistic interventions. This study sought to examine the magnitude, extent, and predictors of justification of physical IPV against women among men and women in Nigeria. Data from 33,385 women and 15,486 men from the 2008 Nigerian demographic and health surveys were analyzed using chi-square test and multiple logistic regressions. Results show that although larger proportions of women justified physical IPV, certain categories of men such as poor, illiterate men, and men with secondary education justified abuse more than women. Contrary to expectations, access to radio/TV increased the odds of justifying abuse among women thus casting doubts on program content. The gender differences observed for predictors of attitudes to physical IPV suggest a need for gender-tailored interventions to change attitudes toward partner violence in Nigeria.

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  • ieee
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  • vancouver
  • Other style
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  • en-GB
  • en-US
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