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  • 1.
    Ahmadi, Fereshteh
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Criminology, Social Work.
    Darvishpour, Mehrdad
    Department of social work, Academy of Health and Welfare, Mälardalen University, Mälardalen, Swe.
    Ahmadi, Nader
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Criminology, Social Work.
    Palm, Irving
    Department of sociology, Uppsala Universitet, Uppsala, Swed.
    Diversity barometer: attitude changes in Sweden2020In: Nordic Social Work Research, ISSN 2156-857X, E-ISSN 2156-8588, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 21-38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to elucidate and discuss the results of the 2016 Diversity Barometer (Mångfaldsbarometern) and compare these results with those obtained from ten years of the longitudinal Diversity Barometers for 2005?2014. An additional aim is to demonstrate whether and how Swedish people?s experiences of and attitudes toward people with a foreign background and ethnic diversity have changed.A random sample of the Swedish population took part in the annual study, which was carried out in the form of a nationwide postal survey. The results show that negative attitudes toward ethnic and cultural diversity in general, and migrant population in particular, have increased to some extent and with respect to certain issues. Views on diversity in relation to culture and religion ? especially Islam ? were more negative than views on diversity in relation to work. Those who have larger experience of contact with foreigners show a more positive attitude toward diversity compared with those with limited experience and contact. Individuals who have higher education, those who identify themselves as female, younger persons and those living in large cities are more positive than other groups. In our analysis of the empirical data, we proceeded from a social work perspective and applied contact theory and group conflict theories relating attitudes to group position.

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  • 2.
    Andersson, Katarina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Sjölund, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Criminology, Social Work.
    Swedish eldercare within home care services at night-time: perceptions and expressions of ‘good care’ from the perspective of care workers and care unit managers2022In: Nordic Social Work Research, ISSN 2156-857X, E-ISSN 2156-8588, Vol. 12, no 5, p. 640-653Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article aims to explore and analyse how good and dignified care is perceived and expressed at night-time within elder home care services, in which night-time care represents a knowledge gap. Dignity has become a legislated value in Swedish eldercare, aiming to increase the quality of care and to clarify the ethical values of everyday care practice. The data presented here come from a qualitative case study with in-depth interviews with six care unit managers and 14 care workers in four municipalities. The analysis of the interviewees? perceptions and expressions of good care were informed by Nodding?s concepts: responsiveness, receptivity, and relatedness. The results showed that there was a relative unawareness of the new goals of the dignity policy and there was no specific guidance regarding dignity during night-time care. The care unit managers? perspective was mainly administrative and related to the policy level and the staff?s ability to care. The care workers? view of good and dignified care included aspects of ideal characteristics and user-centredness with a focus on older people?s individual needs. However, good care was conditioned by time. The dignity policy, as described in national documents, was perceived by the interviewees as vague and with unreachable goals constructed on the structural level. In social care practice, however, expressions of good and dignified care were already found in care ethics, regardless of the dignity policy. By bringing relationality to the dignity discourse on the structural policy level, recognition of care may be emphasized.

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  • 3.
    Aslan, Pinar
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Criminology, Social Work.
    Sjöberg, Stefan
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Criminology, Social Work.
    Wikström, Eva
    Department of Social Work, Umeå University.
    Ahmadi, Nader
    Myndigheten för arbetsmiljökunskap.
    Door openers? Public officials as supportive actors in the labour market participation of descendants of immigrants in Sweden2021In: Nordic Social Work Research, ISSN 2156-857X, E-ISSN 2156-8588, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 199-212Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to examine how employed descendants of immigrants in Sweden perceive that interactions with public officials have benefitted their occupational aspirations and attainments. We conducted qualitative semi-structured interviews with twelve female and nine male descendants of immigrants, followed by an abductive thematic analysis. Applying a theoretical framework of social capital, we found three main influences of public officials from respondents’ perspectives: 1) connectedness, 2) supporting personal goals and focusing on possibilities, and 3) mediation of knowledge and information. We discuss and analyse the symbolic resources deriving from these influences, e.g. increased motivation and self-belief, and conceptualize these resources as social capital contributing to the occupational aspirations and attainments of immigrants’ descendants.

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  • 4.
    Barthel, Stephan
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building Engineering, Energy Systems and Sustainability Science, Environmental Science.
    Colding, Johan
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building Engineering, Energy Systems and Sustainability Science, Environmental Science.
    Hiswåls, Anne-Sofie
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Public Health and Sport Science, Public Health Science.
    Thalén, Peder
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Humanities, Religious studies.
    Turunen, Päivi
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Criminology, Social Work.
    Urban green commons for socially sustainable cities and communities2022In: Nordic Social Work Research, ISSN 2156-857X, E-ISSN 2156-8588, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 310-322Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In these times of global pandemics and climate crisis, social sustainability has become a crucial issue within diverse sectors and disciplines. This article aims to broaden the discussions on social sustainability in general, and in relation to community work within professional social work in particular.

    By means of a cross-disciplinary bricolage approach – with a focus on the commons – we aim to construct a holistic view of urban social sustainability. Beginning with the Anthropocene concept, which recognizes the human impact on the Earth’s natural systems and hence highlights the need to include the natural environment as a determinant of good and fair living conditions for all, we remix arguments and examples relating to social sustainability with environmental and spatial dimensions to develop an urban green commons. Our cross-disciplinary perspective extends beyond contemporary social policy by bringing together natural resource management, public health, and spiritual aspects of the commons. In order to fit the plurality of urban contexts across the planet, further critical deliberations are needed, focusing on social sustainability and collective action for sustainable change in each context. 

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  • 5.
    Bengtsson, Mattias
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Social work.
    Sjöblom, Yvonne
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Social work.
    Öberg, Peter
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Social work.
    ‘Well, it’s up to me now’ – young care leavers’ strategies for handling adversities when leaving out-of-home care in Sweden2018In: Nordic Social Work Research, ISSN 2156-857X, E-ISSN 2156-8588, Vol. 8, no sup 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AbstractThis qualitative longitudinal study of 20 young Swedish care leavers investigates their subjective experience of and strategies for handling adversities when being in the process of leaving out-of-home care. The empirical data is based on two sets of interviews, the first conducted at time 1 (T1) when they were still in care but the moving out process had begun, the second (T2) 6-10 months later when the vast majority had left care. The thematic analysis based on resilience theory showed that the majority of the informants over time developed process-oriented strategies, which in our categorization emanated either from the inner world of the informants (e.g. through re-framing of experiences and an emerging self-reliance) or from their outer contextual world (e.g. through a restructuring of the social network). The results are discussed from a resilience theoretical perspective in which the informants' strategies are illustrated by the conceptual pair of 'navigation' and 'negotiation', used to make sense of their inner and outer world-oriented strategies.

  • 6.
    Grell, Pär
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Social work.
    Ahmadi, Nader
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Social work.
    Blom, Björn
    Umeå universitetet, Institutionen för socialt arbete.
    ‘Sometimes it’s really complicated!’: clients with complex needs on their encounters with specialised personal social service organisations in Sweden2016In: Nordic Social Work Research, ISSN 2156-857X, E-ISSN 2156-8588, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 188-200Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research in the field of human services has paid limited attention to the consequences of the international development toward organisational specialisation; the consequences for clients have been overlooked in particular. The aim of the article is to describe and analyse the consequences of organizationally specialised personal social services (PSS) in Sweden for clients with complex needs. Findings from a survey and an interview study addressing PSS clients show that clients primarily perceived their encounters with the specialised PSS negatively, and that they experienced several elements of service fragmentation. Implications of the findings are discussed in light of previous research and theory in the area.

  • 7.
    Grell, Pär
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Criminology, Social Work.
    Blom, Björn
    Umeå universitetet, Institutionen för socialt arbete.
    Ahmadi, Nader
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Criminology, Social Work.
    Conditions for helping relations in specialized personal social services: a client perspective on the influence of organizational structure2020In: Nordic Social Work Research, ISSN 2156-857X, E-ISSN 2156-8588, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 356-368Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article highlights organizational structure as a factor influencing conditions for helping relations. It is based on a survey study and an interview study, both directed at parents in families that have parallel contacts in different parts of Swedish personal social services (PSS). The aim is to describe and analyse conditions for helping relations when clients with complex needs encounter specialized PSS.

    Low system trust, people processing dimensions of work, and an organizational and a professional emphasis on formal organizational structures and boundaries were found to constitute unfavourable conditions. Conversely, an occurrence of individual trust, people sustaining and people changing dimensions of work, as well as informal organization and individual social workers’ boundary spanning efforts, constituted favourable conditions. The article concludes that greater understanding of how clients are affected by contextual service conditions can give some pointers towards how to generally improve services for vulnerable and disadvantaged populations.

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  • 8.
    Högdin, Sara
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad.
    Sjöblom, Yvonne
    Stockholms universitet, Institutionen för socialt arbete - Socialhögskolan.
    Leaving home in early youth: influential factors in running away from home or being thrown out2012In: Nordic Social Work Research, ISSN 2156-857X, E-ISSN 2156-8588, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 39-58Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The main objective of this article is to investigate the extent to which youth in Sweden run away from or are thrown out of their homes. A further aim is to determine what conditions lead up to and triggers such a break-up and to see what takes place during the break-up process itself. In our results roughly one in ten of youth in Sweden (≈11%) had experienced a difficult break-up from home by running away or being thrown out. Over 30% of those placed in foster families or institutions had run away from home or been thrown out. By our results, only a minority of runaways do so for the excitement or the fun. The majority made clear that their running away was a flight from the family rather than to something exciting and adventurous. It is also obvious from the results that young people who have run away three or more times are more severely at risk than those who have experienced only one or two break-ups from home. For some of these young people, a breakaway from home is the start, however premature, of an independent adult life. This vulnerable group of young people should be entitled to support from the social welfare system during their transition to adulthood.

  • 9.
    Jess, Kari
    et al.
    Department of Health and Welfare, Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden.
    Lyrberg, Ann
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Criminology, Social Work. Centre for Research and Development, Uppsala University/Region Gävleborg, Gävle, Sweden.
    Isaksson, Johan
    Department of Medical Sciences, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden;Center of Neurodevelopmental Disorders (KIND), Centre for Psychiatry Research, Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Karolinska Institutet & Stockholm Health Care Services, Region Stockholm, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nehlin, Christina
    Department of Medical Sciences, Psychiatry, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Me & my family: a programme for children and parents in families with parental substance use problems – an outcome study2023In: Nordic Social Work Research, ISSN 2156-857X, E-ISSN 2156-8588Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Me & my family is a knowledge- and motivation-based programme that includes eight weekly sessions provided by the social services for families in which there are parental substance use problems (SUPs). The aim of this study was to evaluate the programme outcomes in terms of child and parental well-being, family climate, and parental alcohol and drug use. The study involved self-reported ratings from 59 children, aged 5–20 years, and 67 parents, of whom approximately two-thirds completed the programme and provided the self-ratings before, on completing, and three months after the intervention. Findings included a significant increase in family closeness and a significant reduction in family chaos after the intervention, which persisted three months post-intervention. Children also reported a reduction in self-rated conduct problems, whereas parents reported a similar reduction in self-rated symptoms of anxiety and depression. Parents also reported less alcohol and drug consumption post-intervention relative to baseline ratings. The findings suggest that the Me & my family programme supports child and family well-being and could potentially protect children from later detrimental outcomes. The results need to be replicated to evaluate the effectiveness of this programme compared with other programmes within the social services. 

  • 10.
    Munobwa, Jimmy
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Criminology, Social Work.
    Ahmadi, Fereshteh
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Criminology, Social Work.
    Öberg, Peter
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Criminology, Social Work.
    ‘Anxiety, frustration and understanding’: Swedish personal social service workers’ cognitive appraisals of encounters with violent clients2023In: Nordic Social Work Research, ISSN 2156-857X, E-ISSN 2156-8588, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 188-201Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Workplace violence and threats from social service users towards social workers (client violence) is a problem in Sweden and internationally. This article explores the circumstances that make client violence stressful to social workers who exercise public authority in Swedish individual and family social services. The empirical data are based on qualitative inter- views with social workers (n = 19) who, according to their own perception, have been threatened or assaulted by a client in relation to work. Theory on cognitive appraisal of threat and harm is used. The results, analysed by Inductive Thematic Analysis, show that client violence is stressful because it poses a threat to social workers’ professional identity and private life, and occurs in uncertain and repetitive ways. The results suggest that a negligent safety culture in social service agencies, characterized by normalization of client violence and limited organizational support, may contribute to stress related to client violence. The results are discussed in light of how social workers and social service agencies transact and affect each other.

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  • 11.
    Munobwa, Jimmy
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Criminology, Social Work.
    Ahmadi, Fereshteh
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Criminology, Social Work.
    Öberg, Peter
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Criminology, Social Work.
    Creeping under the skin: manifestations of client violence towards social workers in Swedish individual and family services2023In: Nordic Social Work Research, ISSN 2156-857X, E-ISSN 2156-8588, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 202-216Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Client violence can affect social workers negatively. In this paper, we explore what the experience of client violence entails for social workers who exercise public authority in Swedish individual and family social services. The empirical data are based on qualitative interviews with social workers (n = 19) and analysed using inductive thematic analysis and power theory. The results show that social workers experienced physical and non-physical violence, often perpetrated through several related incidents. Clients’ use of violence was mainly in reaction to social workers’ exercise of public authority. Organization and delivery of social services seemed to create friction that agitated clients, while putting social work- ers at risk of violence. Social workers situated client violence in two arenas, i.e. the professional and private arena, with perceived aggravation of the violence as it transcended the professional boundary into their private life. The paper highlights the importance of organizational culture that values and promotes the aspirations, dignity and wellbeing of clients and social workers.

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  • 12.
    Sjöberg, Stefan
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Criminology, Social Work.
    Kings, Lisa
    School of Social Sciences, Södertörn University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Suburban commons: the rise of suburban social movements and new urban commons in marginalized neighbourhoods in Stockholm2022In: Nordic Social Work Research, ISSN 2156-857X, E-ISSN 2156-8588, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 284-297Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish universal welfare state has transformed since the 1990s into a mixed welfare model with increasing deregulation, recommodification, and reverse distribution from the public to the private sector where capital and influence have concentrated. In major cities such as Stockholm, this has resulted in a polarization where groups in the city centre and residential areas have accumulated wealth and resources while groups in marginalized suburbs and neighbourhoods have faced increasing social exclusion and marginalization. Public sector social work has long focused on individual case work, whereas this development calls for increasing community work initiatives. In this article, we analyse the rise of urban social movements mobilizing for inclusion, influence, and social justice as important aspects of contemporary community work in the Swedish urban periphery. Through analysis of semi-structured interviews with community workers and activists as well as media articles, reports, and web-based materials, the results show how the mobilization of the organization Megafonen has contributed to the development of new social institutions and urban commons.

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  • 13.
    Sjöberg, Stefan
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Criminology, Social Work.
    Turunen, Päivi
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Criminology, Social Work.
    Community work in Nordic welfare states in transformation: directions, conditions and dilemmas2022In: Nordic Social Work Research, ISSN 2156-857X, E-ISSN 2156-8588, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 209-216Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Tham, Pia
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Social work.
    Where the need is greatest: a comparison of the perceived working conditions of social workers in Swedish metropolitan low-, middle-and high-income areas in 2003 and 20142018In: Nordic Social Work Research, ISSN 2156-857X, E-ISSN 2156-8588, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 185-200Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study is the third in a series of studies comparing the development of the working conditions of child welfare social workers in Sweden during the last decade. The same questionnaire was distributed in 2014 (n = 349) to the social workers handling investigations of children and youth who were working with the same types of tasks in the districts previously investigated in 2003 (n = 309). The questionnaire (QPS Nordic) contained questions about their job content, role conflicts, demands, organisational climate, job satisfaction and intention to leave the workplace or change profession. The aim of the present study was to analyse this development in relation to the low-income, middle-income and high-income districts where the social workers were employed. The results reveal two different patterns. The first concerns the social workers’ perception of their work tasks where the situation seems to have deteriorated in all three income areas but more so in the low income areas. Furthermore, the social workers’ intention to leave the workplace and health problems had increased overall, but were more pronounced in the low income areas. The second pattern concerns the differences in the social workers’ perception of their workplace in terms of support, leadership and organisational climate. In the low-income areas the social workers today are significantly less satisfied with how their organisations function than their colleagues were in 2003, whereas the social workers in the other areas today seem significantly more satisfied than in 2003. The consequences of these changes and their probable background are discussed.

  • 15.
    Trygged, Sven
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Criminology, Social Work.
    Lindgren Ödén, Birgit
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Humanities, Religious studies.
    Björkman, Annica
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Caring Science, Caring Science.
    Body. Grade. Relation. Understanding children’s needs through interprofessional learning2022In: Nordic Social Work Research, ISSN 2156-857X, E-ISSN 2156-8588, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 153-165Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to explore interprofessional learning among students from nursing, education, and social work programmes in Sweden. Four or five students from each programme participated in focus group interviews. Students were asked in homogenous and mixed groups to judge a fictitious case of a young schoolboy with multiple needs. Interviews were recorded, transcribed, and analysed with content analysis. We found that nursing students focused on nutrition and physi-cal well-being, education students on grades and course, and social work students on context, collaboration, and coordinating activities. Students in the mixed groups described the concept of interprofessional learning as opening their eyes to the need for later collaboration as professionals. To conclude, the study shows that students adopt a narrow professional way of thinking when socialized only within their own discipline as illu-strated by the theme: Body, Grade, Relation, with a risk of not taking full responsibility in a complex case such as a child in need. When exposed to other professions, students expand their perspectives and learn from each other to the benefit of their mutual clients.

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    Body. Grade. Relation.
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