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  • 1.
    Bergsten, Eva
    et al.
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning. Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Vingård, Eva
    Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Psychosocial work factors and musculoskeletal pain: a cross-sectional study among Swedish flight baggage handlers2015Ingår i: BioMed Research International, ISSN 2314-6133, E-ISSN 2314-6141, Vol. 2015, artikel-id 798042Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. Flight baggage handlers sort and load luggage to airplanes. This study aimed at investigating associations between psychosocial exposures and low back and shoulder musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) among Swedish flight baggage handlers.

    Methods. A questionnaire addressing MSDs (Standardized Nordic Questionnaire) and psychosocial factors (Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire, COPSOQ) was answered by 525 baggage handlers in six Swedish airports.

    Results. Low back (LBP) and shoulder pain (SP) was reported by 70% and 60%, respectively. Pain was reported to interfere with work (PIW) by 30% (low back) and 18% (shoulders), and intense pain (PINT) occurred in 34% and 28% of the population. Quality of leadership was the most dissatisfying psychosocial factor, while the most positive was social community at work. Low ratings in the combined domain Work organization and job content were significantly associated with PIW in both low back and shoulders (Adjusted Hazard Ratios 3.65 (95% CI 1.67-7.99) and 2.68 (1.09-6.61)) while lower ratings in the domain Interpersonal relations and leadership were associated with PIW LBP (HR 2.18 (1.06-4.49)) and PINT LBP and SP (HRs 1.95 (1.05-3.65) and 2.11 (1.08-4.12)).

    Conclusion. Severity of pain among flight baggage handlers was associated with psychosocial factors at work, suggesting that they may be a relevant target for intervention in this occupation.

  • 2.
    Hallman, David M.
    et al.
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Lyskov, Eugene
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Long-term monitoring of physical behavior reveals different cardiac responses to physical activity among subjects with and without chronic neck pain2015Ingår i: BioMed Research International, ISSN 2314-6133, E-ISSN 2314-6141, Vol. 2015, artikel-id 907482Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background We determined the extent to which heart rate variability (HRV) responses to daily physical activity differ between subjects with and without chronic neck pain.

    Method Twenty-nine subjects (13 women) with chronic neck pain and 27 age- and gender-matched healthy controls participated. Physical activity (accelerometry), HRV (heart rate monitor) and spatial location (Global Positioning System (GPS)) were recorded for 74 hours. GPS data were combined with a diary to identify periods of work, and of leisure at home and elsewhere. Time- and frequency-domain HRV indices were calculated, and stratified by period and activity type (lying/sitting, standing, or walking). ANCOVAs with multiple adjustments were used to disclose possible group differences in HRV.

    Results The pain group showed a reduced HRV response to physical activity compared with controls (p=.001), according to the sympathetic-baroreceptor HRV index (LF/HF, ratio between low and high frequency power), even after adjustment for leisure time physical activity, work stress, sleep quality, mental health, and aerobic capacity (p=.02). The parasympathetic response to physical activity did not differ between groups.

    Conclusions Relying on long-term monitoring of physical behavior and heart rate variability, we found an aberrant sympathetic-baroreceptor response to daily physical activity among subjects with chronic neck pain.

  • 3.
    Tronarp, Rebecca
    et al.
    Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Nyberg, André
    Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Hedlund, Mattias
    Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Häger, Charlotte K.
    Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    McDonough, Suzanne
    Institute of Nursing and Health Research, Ulster University, Jordanstown, UK.
    Björklund, Martin
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning. Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Office-cycling: a promising way to raise pain thresholds and increase metabolism with minimal compromising of work performance2018Ingår i: BioMed Research International, ISSN 2314-6133, E-ISSN 2314-6141, Vol. 2018, artikel-id 5427201Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Sedentary behaviour constitutes a risk for lifestyle related diseases and musculoskeletal pain which does not seem to be compensated for by shorter bouts of high intensity physical activity. A way of tackling this may be long term light intensity physical activity while performing office work.

    Aim: Establish the effects of low intensity cycling (LC), moderate intensity cycling (MC) and standing at a simulated office workstation on pain modulation, metabolic expenditure and work performance.

    Methods: 36 healthy adults (21 females), mean age 26.8 (SD 7.6) years, partook in this randomized 3x3 cross-over trial with 75 minutes of LC on 20% of maximum aerobic power output (MAP), 30 minutes of MC on 50% of MAP and standing 30 minutes with 48 hours wash-out periods. Outcome measures were pain modulation (pressure- and thermal pain thresholds, (PPT and TPT)), work performance (transcription, mouse pointing and cognitive performance) and metabolic expenditure.

    Results: PPTs increased in all conditions. Median increase in PPT trapezius was highest after LC; 39.3 kilopascal (kPa) (15.6;78.6) compared to MC; 17.0 kPa (2.8;49.9) and standing; 16.8 kPa (-5.6;39.4), p=0.015. TPT showed no change. Work performance; compared to standing, transcription was reduced during LC and MC, mouse pointing was faster in LC but had more errors while slower with more errors in MC. Performance in the cognitive task did not differ between conditions. Metabolic expenditure rates differed between all conditions (p<0.001) and were 1.4 (1.3;1.7), 3.3 (2.3;3.7) and 7.5 (5.8;8.7) kilocalories per minute during standing, LC and MC, respectively.

    Conclusions: LC seem to be the preferred option since it raised PPTs, more than doubled metabolic expenditure, while minimally influencing work performance when compared to standing. Thus, LC is promising but requires corroboration in field studies.

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