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  • 1.
    Assefa, Getachew
    et al.
    Division of Industrial Ecology, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Björklund, Anna
    Division of Industrial Ecology, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Ola
    Division of Industrial Ecology, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Frostell, Björn
    Division of Industrial Ecology, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    ORWARE: an aid to Environmental Technology Chain Assessment2005Ingår i: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 13, nr 3, s. 265-274Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses the ORWARE tool, a model originally developed for environmental systems analysis of waste management systems, and shows its prospect as a tool for environmental technology chain assessment. Different concepts of technology assessment are presented to put ORWARE into context in the discussion that has been going for more than two decades since the establishment of the US Congressional Office of Technology Assessment (OTA). An even-handed assessment is important in different ways such as reproducibility, reliability, credibility, etc. Conventional technology assessment (TA) relied on the judgements and intuition of the assessors. A computer-based tool such as ORWARE provides a basis for transparency and a structured management of input and output data that cover ecological and economic parameters. This permits consistent and coherent technology assessments. Using quantitative analysis as in ORWARE makes comparison and addition of values across chain of technologies easier. We illustrate the application of the model in environmental technology chain assessment through a study of alternative technical systems linking waste management to vehicle fuel production and use. The principles of material and substance flow modelling, life cycle perspective, and graphical modelling featured in ORWARE offer a generic structure for environmentally focused TA of chains and networks of technical processes.

  • 2.
    Blanco-Portela, Norka
    et al.
    Department of Environmental Management, Universitaria Agustiniana, Colombia.
    Benayas, Javier
    Department of Ecology, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Spain.
    Pertierra, Luis R.
    Department of Biology, Geology, Physics and Chemistry, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Spain.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för teknik och miljö, Avdelningen för Industriell utveckling, IT och Samhällsbyggnad, Industriell ekonomi. Organisational Sustainability, Ltd., Cardiff, UK.
    Towards the integration of sustainability in Higher Education Institutions: a review of drivers of and barriers to organisational change and their comparison against those found of companies2017Ingår i: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 166, s. 563-578Artikel, forskningsöversikt (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, there have been a considerable number of efforts to integrate sustainability into Higher Education Institutions (HEIs); however, there are still challenges that need to be overcome. A process that has received an increasing attention has been the Organisational Change Management for Sustainability. This article is aimed at reviewing the main drivers of the integration of sustainable practices and the barriers to change slowing or stopping it. A systematic literature review was carried out using Web of Science de Thomson Reuters and in Scopus databases focusing on retrieving all papers on sustainability in HEIs published between 2000 and 2016. The drivers of and barriers found for the integration of sustainability in HEIs were compared to those previously described for companies. The similarities on drivers to change found in HEIs and companies were greater for external ones. A lower number of barriers to change were reported in the literature for HEIs than those reported for corporations, nonetheless, it was found that HEIs and companies have several common barriers to change. The article proposes a list of main drivers of and barriers to change, some general and others context specific. The findings on the drivers of the integration of sustainable practices in HEIs can serve to identify additional good practices at companies and vice versa. The barriers to change detected for the process of integration can help into anticipating, preventing and overcoming them. This knowledge can help institutions better plan and use their resources in working to becoming more sustainable.

  • 3.
    Brunke, Jean-Christian
    et al.
    Institute for Energy Economics and the Rational Use of Energy (IER), University of Stuttgart, Stuttgart, Germany .
    Johansson, Maria
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för teknik och miljö, Avdelningen för bygg- energi- och miljöteknik, Energisystem. Department of Management and Engineering, Division of Energy Systems, Linköping University.
    Thollander, Patrik
    Department of Management and Engineering, Division of Energy Systems, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden .
    Empirical investigation of barriers and drivers to the adoption of energy conservation measures, energy management practices and energy services in the Swedish iron and steel industry2014Ingår i: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 84, nr 1, s. 509-525Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish iron and steel industry is focused on the production of advanced steel grades and accounts for about 5% of the country's final energy consumption. Energy efficiency is according to the European Commission a key element for the transition towards a resource-efficient economy. We investigated four aspects that are associated with the adoption of cost-effective energy conservation measures: barriers, drivers, energy management practices and energy services. We used questionnaires and follow-up telephone interviews to collect data from members of the Swedish steel association. The heterogeneous observations implied a classification into steel producers and downstream actors. For testing the significance, the Mann–Whitney U test was used. The most important barriers were internal economic and behavioural barriers. Energy service companies, in particular third-party financing, played a minor role. In contrast, high importance was attached to energy management as the most important drivers originated from within the company. Energy management practices showed that steel companies are actively engaged in the topic, but need to raise its prioritisation and awareness within the organisation. When sound energy management practices are included, the participants assessed the cost-effective energy conservation potential to be 9.7%, which was 2.4% higher than the potential for solely adopting cost-effective technologies.

  • 4.
    Colding, Johan
    et al.
    Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden; The Beijer Institute of Ecological Economics, Royal Academy of Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Barthel, Stephan
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för teknik och miljö, Avdelningen för bygg- energi- och miljöteknik, Miljöteknik. Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    An urban ecology critique on the "Smart City" model2017Ingår i: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 164, s. 95-101Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this letter is to raise some critical concerns and gaps in the booming literature on Smart Cities; concerns that we think deserve greater attention from scientists, policy makers and urban planners. Using an urban ecology lens, we provide some reflections that need to forgo any wider-scale implementation of the Smart City-model with the goal to enhance urban sustainability. We discuss that the Smart City literature must better include analysis around social sustainability issues for city dwellers. Focus here should start on health issues and more critical analysis about whom the Smart City is for. Also, the literature must address issues of resilience and cyber security, including how Smart City solutions may affect the autonomy of urban governance, personal integrity and how it may affect the resilience of infrastructures that provide inhabitants with basic needs, such as food, energy and water security. A third major gap in this literature is how smart city developments may change human-nature relations. Focus here should start on how Smart City technologies may hinder or support children’s learning towards a stronger psychological connection with nature. Discussions are also needed on how the Smart City model may affect pro-environmental behavior more broadly.

  • 5.
    Djuric Ilic, Danica
    et al.
    Division of Energy Systems, Department of Management and Engineering, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Ola
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för teknik och miljö, Avdelningen för bygg- energi- och miljöteknik, Miljöteknik.
    Ödlund, Louise
    Division of Energy Systems, Department of Management and Engineering, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Åberg, Magnus
    Department of Engineering Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    No zero burden assumption in a circular economy2018Ingår i: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 182, s. 352-362Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    A majority of previous studies on environmental problems caused by waste generation have focused on waste disposal issues without fully highlighting the primary reasons behind the problems. As a consequence, efforts to reduce these problems are usually directed towards the stakeholders that provide waste treatment and disposal instead of the stakeholders that contribute to waste generation. In order to detect connections between different problems of sustainability and to suggest measures which may contribute to their solutions, this study provides a simplified overview of the mechanisms behind waste generation and management. The results from the study show that the only way to eliminate problems of sustainability is to apply an upstream approach by dealing with the primary problems which occur in the early stages of the system (e.g. overconsumption of products, as well as use of finite resources, toxic materials, and non-recyclable materials). By dealing with these problems, the emergence of secondary problems would be prevented. Thereby, stakeholders who have the highest possibility to contribute to the sustainable development of the waste generation and management are the stakeholders from the origin of the product's life cycles, such as product developers, manufacturing companies, product users and policy makers. Different trade-off situations such as contradictions between economics, recyclability, energy efficiency, make it even harder to deal with issues of sustainability related to the system and to detect the stakeholders who may contribute to the development. One of the main conclusions from this study is that when transforming society towards a circular economy, the traditional view of separate systems for production and waste management must be changed. In order to refer to all problems of sustainability and also cover the top steps of the waste hierarchy, life cycle assessment of waste management should include manufacture and use of products ending up as waste. Waste entering the waste management system with “zero burden” by releasing the previous actors of the waste life cycle from any responsibility related to the environment (i.e. by shifting the total environmental burden into the waste management system), does not capture the problems with waste generation.

  • 6.
    Eriksson, Ola
    et al.
    KTH, Industriell ekologi (flyttat 20130630).
    Carlsson Reich, M.
    Frostell, Björn
    KTH, Industriell ekologi (flyttat 20130630).
    Björklund, Anna
    KTH, Industriell ekologi (flyttat 20130630).
    Assefa, Getachew
    KTH, Industriell ekologi (flyttat 20130630).
    Sundqvist, J-O
    Granath, J
    Baky, A
    Thyselius, L
    Municipal Solid Waste Management from a Systems Perspective2005Ingår i: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 13, nr 3, s. 241-252Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Different waste treatment options for municipal solid waste have been studied in a systems analysis. Different combinations of incineration, materials recycling of separated plastic and cardboard containers, and biological treatment (anaerobic digestion and composting) of biodegradable waste, were studied and compared to landfilling. The evaluation covered use of energy resources, environmental impact and financial and environmental costs. In the study, a calculation model ( ) based on methodology from life cycle assessment (LCA) was used. Case studies were performed in three Swedish municipalities: Uppsala, Stockholm, and Älvdalen.

    The study shows that reduced landfilling in favour of increased recycling of energy and materials lead to lower environmental impact, lower consumption of energy resources, and lower economic costs. Landfilling of energy-rich waste should be avoided as far as possible, partly because of the negative environmental impacts from landfilling, but mainly because of the low recovery of resources when landfilling.

    Differences between materials recycling, nutrient recycling and incineration are small but in general recycling of plastic is somewhat better than incineration and biological treatment somewhat worse.

    When planning waste management, it is important to know that the choice of waste treatment method affects processes outside the waste management system, such as generation of district heating, electricity, vehicle fuel, plastic, cardboard, and fertiliser.

  • 7.
    Eriksson, Ola
    et al.
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för teknik och miljö, Avdelningen för bygg- energi- och miljöteknik, Miljöteknik.
    Jonsson, Daniel
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för teknik och miljö, Avdelningen för bygg- energi- och miljöteknik, Miljöteknik.
    Hillman, Karl
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för teknik och miljö, Avdelningen för bygg- energi- och miljöteknik, Miljöteknik.
    Life cycle assessment of Swedish single malt whisky2016Ingår i: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 112, nr 1, s. 229-237Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Agricultural production and further processing to food and drink have large impacts on the environment. However, there are still few examples of LCA studies on beverages such as whisky. This paper presents a life cycle assessment of Swedish single malt whisky and different environmental improvements of the production chain are discussed. The functional unit is one bottle (70cl) of whisky and results are obtained for global warming potential (GWP), Acidification Potential (AP), Eutrophication potential (EP) and primary energy (PE). The contribution to GWP is dominated by CO<inf>2</inf> emissions from transport of stillage. When avoided emissions from use of biogas are included, the net result is 2.1tonnes CO<inf>2</inf>-eq. Acidification is mainly due to emissions of SO<inf>2</inf> from bottle production, transport and barley cultivation which ends up to 14.6kgSO<inf>2</inf>-eq. Eutrophication results are totally dominated by barley cultivation, in total 8.6kgPO43-The total use of primary energy is 53.5MJ/FU with a 50/50 distribution in renewable and non-renewable. Non-renewables emanate from fossil fuels used for transports and in glass production, whereas renewables are mostly used for heating in the distillery. Improvement analysis of transports included; (1) decreasing need of transport, (2) change of fuel and (3) change of transport mode. Decreasing transport of stillage is an efficient measure to reduce GWP and use of non-renewable energy. Substituting diesel with biodiesel for all road transports is an even more efficient measure for these categories, but increases other environmental impact. For all impact categories except use of renewable energy a scenario combining all improvements is the most efficient measure to reduce environmental impact. The results can be used by the manufacturer, but an improved and expanded LCA on product level can be used for a more specific eco-labelling of the different whisky editions. 

  • 8.
    Guven, Huseyin
    et al.
    Istanbul Technical University, Civil Engineering Faculty, Environmental Engineering Department, Istanbul, Turkey.
    Wang, Zhao
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för teknik och miljö, Avdelningen för byggnadsteknik, energisystem och miljövetenskap, Miljövetenskap.
    Eriksson, Ola
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för teknik och miljö, Avdelningen för byggnadsteknik, energisystem och miljövetenskap, Miljövetenskap.
    Evaluation of future food waste management alternatives in Istanbul from the life cycle assessment perspective2019Ingår i: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 239, artikel-id 117999Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    In developing countries like Turkey, food waste has the highest share compared to other municipal solid waste components. A detailed life cycle assessment has been performed to evaluate different food waste management options (i.e., landfilling, anaerobic digestion, thermal treatment, co-treatment with municipal wastewater) for Istanbul which is the largest city of Turkey and Europe. The current waste management has the worst environmental performance compared to proposed waste management scenarios as follows: Anaerobic digestion, thermal treatment and co-treatment with municipal wastewater. The thermal treatment scenario has been found to have the best environmental performance in most of the impact categories including climate change. The anaerobic digestion scenario ranks in the first place only in freshwater eutrophication, which is attributed to avoided fertilizer use in this scenario. A drastic improvement with 866% has been found in this category if the anaerobic digestion scenario was followed. Co-treatment with municipal wastewater refers to use of food waste disposers at households and provides improvements especially in marine eutrophication and ecotoxicity. Lower effluent emissions by means of biological wastewater treatment in the co-treatment scenario compared to other proposed scenarios lead to better performance in these categories. Various sub-scenarios have also been investigated such as using biogas as vehicle fuel, replacing a combined heat and power with a condensing plant and increasing food waste addition to sewer lines. Important improvements are not achievable in the first two sub-scenarios; however, increasing food waste addition to sewer lines reduces various environmental impact categories by −41% and −60%. © 2019 Elsevier Ltd

  • 9.
    Holm, Tove
    et al.
    Sykli Environmental School of Finland, Finland.
    Sammalisto, Kaisu
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för teknik och miljö, Avdelningen för Industriell utveckling, IT och Samhällsbyggnad, Industriell ekonomi. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för logistik och innovativ produktion.
    Caeiro, Sandra
    Universidade Aberta and CENSE from Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Lisboa, Portugal.
    Rieckmann, Marco
    University of Vechta, Germany.
    Dlouhá, Jana
    Charles University in Prague, Prague, Czech Republic.
    Wright, Tarah
    Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada.
    Ceulemans, Kim
    University of Victoria, Gustavson Business School, Centre for Social and Sustainable Innovation, Victoria, BC, Canada.
    Benayas, Javier
    Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Madrid, Spain.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    ournal of Cleaner Production, The Netherlands; Copernicus Institute of Sustainable Development, Utrecht University, The Netherlands.
    Developing sustainability into a golden thread throughout all levels of education2016Ingår i: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 117, s. 1-3Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 10.
    Holm, Tove
    et al.
    Sykli Environmental School of Finland, Finland; Department of Biology, University of Turku, Finland; Novia University of Applied Sciences, Finland .
    Sammalisto, Kaisu
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för teknik och miljö, Avdelningen för Industriell utveckling, IT och Samhällsbyggnad, Industriell ekonomi. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för logistik och innovativ produktion.
    Grindsted, Thomas S.
    Department of Environmental, Social and Spatial Change, Roskilde University, Denmark.
    Vuorisalo, Timo
    Department of Biology, University of Turku, Finland.
    Process framework for identifying sustainability aspects in university curricula and integrating education for sustainable development2015Ingår i: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 106, s. 164-174Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Sustainability aspects in higher education must be enhanced with more concrete actions. Universities are globally required to have quality assurance to secure and improve teaching and learning, and they use management systems to this aim. Integrating education for sustainable development and management systems are alike in that they are based on continuous improvement and systematic thinking; for both processes all stakeholders need to be involved. Although quality assurance is compulsory for higher education, education for sustainable development has barely been examined or integrated in this context.This article examines how voluntary integration of education for sustainable development into management systems at universities could facilitate a scheme to overcome the challenges to integrating education for sustainable development that were identified in previous research. For this, a process framework for integrating education for sustainable development with management systems was developed in a network of 11 universities in the Nordic countries. The framework included planning, assessment, monitoring, and implementation of education for sustainable development. It was piloted and applied to identify relevant sustainability aspects in different disciplines, examples of which are provided in the article. The framework can be applied to visualize the implementation of education for sustainable development. 

  • 11.
    Holm, Tove
    et al.
    University of Turku, Department of Biology; Novia University of Applied Sciences.
    Sammalisto, Kaisu
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för teknik och miljö, Avdelningen för Industriell utveckling, IT och Samhällsbyggnad, Industriell ekonomi. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för logistik och innovativ produktion.
    Vuorisalo, Timo
    University of Turku, Finland.
    Education for sustainable development and quality assurance in universities in China and the Nordic countries: a comparative study2015Ingår i: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 107, s. 529-537Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The global goal for education for sustainable development (ESD) is to integrate it at all levels of education. For ensuring it the change has to be put in practice, by transforming universities. The Nordic countries (Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden) strive to be among the regions that lead the way in enhancing ESD, and want to increase cooperation with China. It is therefore interesting to compare the region with China. We compared ESD and quality assurance between these areas at both policy and implementation levels. The former was based on literature, and the latter was studied with specific surveys in academia in both regions; in two provinces in China and in the Nordic countries. We investigated the possibilities to improve ESD in these regions by benefiting from quality assurance requirements. We found that both regions enhance ESD. The rather similar quality assurance requirements do not include ESD. In China, the respondents viewed quality assurance as sustainable development.

  • 12.
    Holm, Tove
    et al.
    University of Turku, Finland; Novia University of Applied Sciences, Finland.
    Vuorisalo, Timo
    University of Turku, Finland.
    Sammalisto, Kaisu
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för teknik och miljö, Avdelningen för Industriell utveckling, IT och Samhällsbyggnad, Industriell ekonomi. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för logistik och innovativ produktion.
    Integrated management systems for enhancing education for sustainable development in universities: a memetic approach2015Ingår i: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 106, s. 155-163Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a need for new approaches for enhancing education for sustainable development in universities. Memetics, which is about effective pathways of communication, could be such a new, promising approach. Quality assurance is required in universities to secure and improve education, which could be another approach. The aim of this study is to look into whether and how frameworks for processes and procedures for quality assurance, such as management systems, could be utilized to promote higher education for sustainable development. The study approaches this from both a theoretical and a practical standpoint. An evolutionary perspective was chosen, considering higher education for sustainable development and management systems as memes, or basic units of cultural replication. The practical context was studied by looking into how 11 universities in the Nordic countries have enhanced ESD with management systems. We found that both higher education for sustainable development and management systems could be considered successful memes and that management systems could be applied to enhance higher education for sustainable development.

  • 13.
    Lozano, Francisco J.
    et al.
    Tecnologico de Monterrey, Campus Monterrey, Monterrey, Mexico.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för teknik och miljö, Avdelningen för Industriell utveckling, IT och Samhällsbyggnad, Industriell ekonomi. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för logistik och innovativ produktion.
    Assessing the potential sustainability benefits of agricultural residues: biomass conversion to syngas for energy generation or to chemicals production2018Ingår i: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 172, s. 4162-4169Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Crop residues represent more than half of the world's agricultural phytomass. Residual biomass, from agriculture or forestry, can be converted into synthesis gas (syngas) to generate energy (electrical or thermal) or chemicals. The paper uses eco-efficiency as a tool to compare these two options. A basis of 1000 kg/hour of residual pecan nut shell residue was considered to estimate the material flow of chemicals that can be produced, as well as the power that can be generated through residual biomass gasification. This study compares two alternate routes: (1) gasification with air, which renders a gas stream with hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, methane and other hydrocarbons, as well as nitrogen; and (2) gasification with steam, where a residual biomass amount is used as fuel, rendering a gas stream like the first route, but without nitrogen. The eco-efficiency index shows that a decrease of environmental influence leads to a high output material flow for the alternative process with higher economic values, thus a higher proportion of input raw materials can be transformed into chemical products. The paper highlights that eco-efficiency can be used as a decision-making tool to choose between transformation processes by combining scientific and technical issues with economic ones. This can help to move towards a better and more sustainable use of natural resources through the utilisation of residual biomass.

  • 14.
    Lozano, Francisco J.
    et al.
    Escuela de Ingeniería y Ciencias, Tecnologico de Monterrey, Monterrey, Mexico.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för teknik och miljö, Avdelningen för Industriell utveckling, IT och Samhällsbyggnad, Industriell ekonomi. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för logistik och innovativ produktion. Organisational Sustainability, Cardiff, United Kingdom.
    Freire, Paulo
    LaProma (Laboratório de Produção e Meio Ambiente), São Paulo, Brazil.
    Jiménez-Gonzalez, Concepción
    GlaxoSmithKline; North Carolina State University, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA.
    Sakao, Tomohiko
    Department of Management and Engineering, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Ortiz, María Gabriela
    Escuela de Ingeniería y Ciencias, Tecnologico de Monterrey, Monterrey, Mexico.
    Trianni, Andrea
    Politecnico di Milano, Milan, Italy.
    Carpenter, Angela
    University of Leeds, United Kingdom.
    Viveros, Tomás
    University of Leeds, United Kingdom; Process and Hydraulics Engineering Department, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana Iztapalapa, Col. Vicentina, México D.F., Mexico.
    New perspectives for green and sustainable chemistry and engineering: approaches from sustainable resource and energy use, management, and transformation2018Ingår i: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 172, s. 227-232Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The special volume on green and sustainable chemistry and engineering has fourteen papers that were considered relevant to the present day issues and discussion, such as adequate use of raw materials and efficient energy, besides considering renewable sources for materials and energy; and changing economical canons towards circular economy. Businesses, governments and Society are facing a number of challenges to tread the sustainability path and provide wellbeing for future generations. This special volume relevance provides discussions and contributions to foster that desirable future. Chemicals are ubiquitous in everyday activities. Their widespread presence provides benefits to societies’ wellbeing, but can have some deleterious effects. To counteract such effect, green engineering and sustainable assessment in industrial processes have been gathering momentum in the last thirty years. Green chemistry, green engineering, eco-efficiency, and sustainability are becoming a necessity for assessing and managing products and processes in the chemical industry. This special volume presents fourteen articles related to sustainable resource and energy use (five articles), circular economy (one article), cleaner production and sustainable process assessment (five article), and innovation in chemical products (three articles). Green and sustainable chemistry, as well as sustainable chemical engineering and renewable energy sources are required to foster and consolidate a transition towards more sustainable societies. This special volume present current trends in chemistry and chemical engineering, such as sustainable resource and energy use, circular economy, cleaner production and sustainable process assessment, and innovation in chemical products. This special volume provides insights in this direction and complementing other efforts towards such transition.

  • 15.
    Niesten, Eva
    et al.
    Manchester Institute of Innovation Research, Alliance Manchester Business School, University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom.
    Jolink, Albert
    Coventry University Business School, Coventry University, Coventry, United Kingdom.
    Lopes de Sousa Jabbour, Ana Beatriz
    Design Manufacture and Engineering Management, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, United Kingdom.
    Chappin, Maryse
    Copernicus Institute of Sustainable Development, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för teknik och miljö, Avdelningen för Industriell utveckling, IT och Samhällsbyggnad, Industriell ekonomi. Organisational Sustainability, Cardiff, United Kingdom.
    Sustainable collaboration: The impact of governance and institutions on sustainable performance2017Ingår i: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 155, nr 2, s. 1-6Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Collaboration between firms is important to stimulate the transition to a more sustainable society. This special volume shows that collaboration is indeed one of the preferred forms of governance to manage relations between firms in a sustainability context. Collaboration enhances sustainable benefits by creating legitimacy of sustainable technologies, reducing waste and improving environmental and social performance of firms. The institutional environment, in particular environmental laws and regulations, has a beneficial impact on collaboration and relationship management in sustainable supply chains. Two studies in this special volume show, however, that stringent environmental regulations may hinder economic performance and result in outsourcing to foreign suppliers with potential detrimental effects for environmental performance. These negative effects can be overcome by firms that invest in sustainable innovation. This special volume also shows that eco-innovation leads to sustainable benefits, such as lower greenhouse gas emissions.

  • 16.
    Sammalisto, Kaisu
    et al.
    Högskolan i Gävle, Institutionen för teknik och byggd miljö, Ämnesavdelningen för industriell ekonomi.
    Brorson, Torbjörn
    International Institute for Industrial Environmental Economics, IIIEE, Lund University, Sweden.
    Training and communication in the implementation of environmental management systems (ISO 14001): A case study at the University of Gävle, Sweden.2008Ingår i: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 15, nr 3, s. 299-309Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Training and communication are essential elements in the implementation of environmental management systems (EMS). This study is based on two main questions: (i) What methods for training and communication will support the implementation of EMS at a university? and, (ii) How did faculty and staff perceive the training and communication activities? The study includes a literature review, a case study of methods for training and communication, and results of a semi quantitative survey of the perception of training and communication. All activities took place at the University of Gävle (Sweden). The University of Gävle was certified according to ISO 14001 in 2004. Practical experiences from the implementation of EMS in industry were used as reference.

    The literature review indicates that training is a key factor during implementation of EMS, and that training may change attitude and behaviour among managers and employees. Similar conclusions can be drawn from this study. The case study, and practical experiences from industry, indicate that similar methods of EMS training and communication can be shared by industry and universities. However, “academic freedom” and “critical thinking” may result in the need for more interactive training methods at a university than in industry. The results of the survey indicate that the training and communication have increased awareness of environmental issues. A deeper understanding of the personal role in the EMS was also observed. It can be concluded that the EMS training and communication team has a demanding task to introduce the concept of indirect environmental aspects at a university. Lecturers and researchers should be convinced that the greening of a college involves more than, for example, reducing the consumption of paper. The main role of EMS at a university should be to focus on indirect environmental aspects, for example, to introduce environmental and sustainability issues in courses and research.

  • 17.
    Sammalisto, Kaisu
    et al.
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för teknik och miljö, Avdelningen för Industriell utveckling, IT och Samhällsbyggnad, Industriell ekonomi. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för logistik och innovativ produktion.
    Sundström, Agneta
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för utbildning och ekonomi, Avdelningen för ekonomi, Företagsekonomi.
    Holm, Tove
    Novia University of Applied Sciences, Vaasa, Finland.
    Implementation of sustainability in universities as perceived by faculty and staff: a model from a Swedish university2015Ingår i: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 106, s. 45-54Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Education for sustainable development creates new challenges for universities where faculty and staff are expected to prepare students to meet complexities in society and take responsibility for sustainability, which scientists are urgently calling for today. Few studies exist on how faculty and staff perceive sustainability in their functions at the university based on long-term sustainability implementation and training within a 14001 certified environmental management system. This university case study with data collected by open-ended survey questions explores how faculty and staff express their role in sustainability work within a Swedish university.The authors developed a model to illustrate development of sustainability competence and its institutionalization. Results show a large variation in perceptions of sustainability from waste separation to a complex understanding and integration of issues into education. Integration of sustainable development as a university core competence is difficult for a whole university to reach. Interpretational flexibility provides opportunities for discussing the sustainability concept in diverse academic traditions in different disciplines. Top management inspiration on different university levels is essential for integration. Continuous training and routines contribute to movement towards institutionalization of sustainability activities and to following up the process in universities.

  • 18.
    Soam, Shveta
    et al.
    DBT- IOC Centre for Advanced Bioenergy Research, Indian Oil Corporation Limited, Research & Development Centre, Faridabad, India.
    Kapoor, Manali
    DBT- IOC Centre for Advanced Bioenergy Research, Indian Oil Corporation Limited, Research & Development Centre, Faridabad, India.
    Kumar, Ravindra
    DBT- IOC Centre for Advanced Bioenergy Research, Indian Oil Corporation Limited, Research & Development Centre, Faridabad, India.
    Gupta, Ravi P.
    DBT- IOC Centre for Advanced Bioenergy Research, Indian Oil Corporation Limited, Research & Development Centre, Faridabad, India.
    Puri, Suresh K.
    DBT- IOC Centre for Advanced Bioenergy Research, Indian Oil Corporation Limited, Research & Development Centre, Faridabad, India.
    Ramakumar, S. S. V.
    Indian Oil Corporation Limited, Research & Development Centre, Faridabad, India.
    Life cycle assessment and life cycle costing of conventional and modified dilute acid pretreatment for fuel ethanol production from rice straw in India2018Ingår i: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract Dilute acid (DA) pretreatment results in the formation of inhibitory compounds and pseudo-lignin along with the burden of unnecessary materials like ash, extractive, lignin or their condensed products that reduces the conversion efficiency of cellulose to monomeric sugar. Indian Oil Corporation Limited (IOCL) has developed a modified pretreatment (MP) in order to reduce the enzyme dosage during ethanol production. This method uses extraction of biomass in water and varying alkali concentration of 0.2, 0.4 and 0.5%, prior to pretreatment as a strategy to reduce the enzyme dosage and improve the ethanol yield. The environmental and economic impact of these MP scenarios in comparison with conventional pretreatment (CP) is studied. The ethanol production increases from 218 to 267 L using MP. The introduction of extraction step prior to DA pretreatment fulfills the objective of reducing enzyme dosage by 23–39%. However, overall life cycle assessment (LCA) results revealed that performance of MP2, MP3 and MP4 is on a negative side in all the environmental impact categories as compared to CP due to the use of alkali, where a huge amount of emissions are released during the production stage. Overall, MP1 using water as a media for extraction is the most environmentally suitable pretreatment process for ethanol production. Life cycle costing (LCC) results showed that cost of 1 L ethanol production could be lowered down from 0.87 to 0.70 United States Dollar (USD) using MP1 scenario. From an environment and economic perspective, it is recommended to use only water as an extraction media for biomass, as this can reduce the enzyme dosage, emissions and cost.

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