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  • 1.
    Butler, Andrew
    et al.
    Institutionen för Stad och Land, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden; Faculty of Landscape and Society, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Ås, Norway.
    Sarlöv-Herlin, Ingrid
    Institutionen för landskapsarkitektur, planering och förvaltning, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Knez, Igor
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Psychology.
    Ångman, Elin
    Institutionen för Stad och Land, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Ode Sang, Åsa
    Institutionen för landskapsarkitektur, planering och förvaltning, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Åkerskog, Ann
    FieldForest Research Institute, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Landscape identity, before and after a forest fire2018In: Landscape research, ISSN 0142-6397, E-ISSN 1469-9710, Vol. 43, no 6, p. 878-889Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Our identity is tied to where we are and how we engage with the landscapes in which we find ourselves. But what happens if the landscape which we use for our everyday life is drastically altered by a catastrophic upheaval, for example, when forest fires ravage the landscape? In this paper, interviews with individuals affected by the largest forest fire in modern Swedish history are used to exemplify our conceptualisation of how landscape identity is impacted by dramatic change. We address the phases of stability, change and progression in relation to the case. Finally, we propose that landscape identity can be utilised as a central concept for engaging with the social aspects of the impact of forest fires.

  • 2.
    Fredholm, Susanne
    et al.
    Department of Conservation, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Eliasson, Ingegärd
    Department of Conservation, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Knez, Igor
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Psychology.
    Conservation of historical landscapes: What signifies ‘successful’ management?2018In: Landscape research, ISSN 0142-6397, E-ISSN 1469-9710, Vol. 43, no 5, p. 735-748Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper focuses on the management of an industrial heritage site in Sweden, which local stakeholders and heritage planners have claimed to be successful. This status of excellence is investigated in relation to the general, county-wide applied heritage planning. The results show that key factors for successful management of the industrial heritage site are not related only to conservation work, but also to personal engagement, sense of responsibility, and well-being among participants. However, heritage planners generally lack methods to address immaterial values and socio-economic benefits of engaging in heritage activities, resulting in a separation between physical and communal aspects of heritage planning. The results highlight the issue of professional legitimacy and the challenges for heritage planners to address regional policy objectives, such as finding ways to utilise historic landscapes in destination-driven strategies and to simultaneously support civil engagement in heritage-related issues. © 2017 Landscape Research Group Ltd

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