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  • 1.
    Bengtsson, Mattias
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Social work.
    Sjöblom, Yvonne
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Social work.
    Öberg, Peter
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Social work.
    Young care leavers’ expectations of their future: A question of time horizon2018In: Child & Family Social Work, ISSN 1356-7500, E-ISSN 1365-2206, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 188-195Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates young care leavers’ expectations of their future after discharge from care. The results are based on qualitative longitudinal data where 16- to 21-year-old care leavers (n = 15) were interviewed twice, first when still in care but planning for their discharge (T1) and the second time 6–9 months later (T2). The analysis using a general inductive approach showed that their expectations were dependent on the time horizon and that there was an obvious difference between the young informants’ short- and long-term expectations. Their short-term expectations consisted of worries connected to their approaching discharge (at T1) and how to cope with challenges of everyday life after discharge from care (at T2). These results seem to echo negative outcomes shown in previous quantitative research. However, the informants’ long-term expectations provide a different picture, being mainly positive in both interviews (T1 and T2). The results are discussed from a life course perspective, where the informants’ visions of their future are framed and understood in terms of the different stages of their transition process.

  • 2.
    Höjer, Ingrid
    et al.
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Sjöblom, Yvonne
    Stockholms universitet, Institutionen för socialt arbete - Socialhögskolan.
    Young people leaving care in Sweden2010In: Child & Family Social Work, ISSN 1356-7500, E-ISSN 1365-2206, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 118-127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The transition from a placement in care to an independent life can be a problematic phase for young people. In Sweden, special care-leaving services are almost non-existent. What then happens to young people when they leave a placement in out-of-home care? This paper draws on the results of a study in which 16 young care leavers between the ages of 18 and 22 years were interviewed. Telephone interviews were also performed with the young care leavers' parents, social workers, foster carers and institutional staff. The aim of the study was to investigate how young care leavers perceive the transition from care to an independent life. The Swedish welfare model, the prolonged transition to adulthood and the family-oriented welfare discourse have been used as analytical perspectives. The results show that young care leavers have a pronounced need for social, emotional, practical and financial support. Whilst such support is occasionally provided by foster carers and residential staff, it is seldom given by social services or biological parents. This group is at risk of facing severe problems in the transitional phase from care to independent life, a fact that is not acknowledged by the Swedish welfare system.

  • 3.
    Storø, Jan
    et al.
    Faculty of Social Sciences, OsloMet‐OsloMetropolitan University, Oslo, Norway.
    Sjöblom, Yvonne
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Criminology, Social Work.
    Höjer, Ingrid
    Department of Social Work, University ofGothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    A comparison of state support for young people leaving care in Norway and Sweden: Differences within comparable welfare systems2019In: Child & Family Social Work, ISSN 1356-7500, E-ISSN 1365-2206, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 393-399Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to account for and discuss support to young care leavers within the comparable welfare regimes of Norway and Sweden and to explore key differences between these 2 countries. This model implies that children and young people are included and entitled to support through being family members, not as independent actors in their own right. This makes young care leaver’s transition from care to adulthood problematic—as they often do not have access to family support, they may be positioned in a vacuum where they are clients neither entitled to support from the child welfare system nor supported by their families of origin. In Norway, legislators and policymakers have agreed that care leavers need particular attention and targeted support, whereas in Sweden, there has been no such agreement. However, the Norwegian system of giving leaving care services is not strong enough to provide transition support to all care leavers, even if the legislation gives stronger protection than in Sweden. The article discusses the need for targeted measures of support for a successful care-leaving process. 

  • 4.
    Söderqvist, Åsa
    et al.
    Jönköping University.
    Sjöblom, Yvonne
    Stockholms universitet, Institutionen för socialt arbete - Socialhögskolan.
    Bülow, Pia
    Jönköping University.
    Home sweet home?: Professionals' understanding of ‘home’ within residential care for unaccompanied youths in Sweden2016In: Child & Family Social Work, ISSN 1356-7500, E-ISSN 1365-2206, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 591-599Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The number of unaccompanied minors arriving in Sweden continues to rise. The majority are placed in residential care units. This qualitative study aims to increase the understanding given by the professionals to the concept of ‘home’ within the framework of residential care for unaccompanied young people. Data are based on participatory observations at two residential care units, followed up by individual interviews with staff. The findings confirm that the concept of home has a complex meaning involving both objective aspects such as physical buildings, and more subjective components that can be seen as state of mind. The staff's desire to offer an ‘ordinary home’ fails because of the surveillance, their dominant positions and especially due to the legal restrictions that were not initially meant for this target group. Unaccompanied young people have to be considered based on their own specific needs in order to make it possible for society to offer the most suitable care.

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