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  • 1.
    Björkman, Annica
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Andersson, Kajsa
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science.
    Bergström, Jenny
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science.
    Salzmann-Erikson, Martin
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Increased Mental Illness and the Challenges This Brings for District Nurses in Primary Care Settings2018In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 39, no 12, p. 1023-1030Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patients with mental illness generally make their initial healthcare contact via a registered nurse. Although studies show that encountering and providing care to care-seekers with mental illness might be a challenge, little research exists regarding Primary Care Nurses' (PCN) view of the challenges they face. The aim of this study was to qualitatively explore PCNs' reflections on encountering care-seekers with mental illness in primary healthcare settings. The results consist of three themes: constantly experiencing patients falling through the cracks, being restricted by lack of knowledge and resources, and establishing a trustful relationship to overcome taboo, shame, and guilt.

  • 2.
    Eivergård, Kristina
    et al.
    Mid-Sweden University, Department of Nursing Sciences, SE- Östersund, Sweden.
    Enmarker, Ingela
    Mid-Sweden University, Department of Nursing Sciences, SE- Östersund, Sweden.
    Hellzén, Per Ove
    Mid-Sweden University, Department of Nursing Sciences, SE- Östersund, Sweden.
    The Talk About the Psychiatric Patient2016In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 37, no 10, p. 756-764Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Essential to psychiatric nursing practice and care, verbal handovers and ward rounds are reporting systems for communication that shapes psychiatric staff's ability to recognize, understand, and construct patients, as well as patients’ ability to construct themselves. Given the centrality of such language in psychiatric practice, the aim of this study was to describe how psychiatric staff talk about patients in psychiatric wards, what their talk encompasses, and what consequences it might pose for patient care. Empirical data were collected from audio recordings of staff discussions of patients during nine verbal handovers and three ward rounds in six different general psychiatric wards in mid and southern Sweden. Findings showed that to describe patients’ mood, characteristics, and behavior, nurses used culturally common words and concepts related to three themes—good patients, bad patients, and to stay or be discharged—and six subthemes—looking well, looking poorly, desirable patients, undesirable patients, continuing work, and being discharged. However, since assessments of and decisions about patients’ conditions and care used everyday language and did not involve patients’ participation, opportunities for patients to participate in their own care were rare.

  • 3.
    Eivergård, Kristina
    et al.
    Department of Nursing Sciences, Mid-Sweden University, Östersund, Sweden; Department of Health Care Science, Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Enmarker, Ingela
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Caring Science, Caring Science.
    Livholts, Mona
    Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Aléx, Lena
    Department of Nursing, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Hellzén, Ove
    Department of Nursing Sciences, Mid-Sweden University, Östersund, Sweden.
    The Importance of Being Acceptable - Psychiatric Staffs' Talk about Women Patients in Forensic Care2019In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 40, no 2, p. 124-132Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Currently, women comprise about ten percent of those sentenced to psychiatric forensic clinics in Sweden. Those who are sentenced to forensic care because of offending and violent behaviour have already taken a step away from the usually expected female behaviour. On the other hand, there are many women in forensic care who have not committed crimes, but who instead self-harm. Studies have identified a gender bias in diagnosing and care in psychiatric settings, but there are few studies conducted on women in forensic care. The present study therefore examined how the situation of women patients and female norms are expressed in the staff's talk about these women during verbal handovers and ward rounds at a forensic clinic in Sweden. The aim was to explore how psychiatric staff, in a context of verbal handovers and ward rounds, talk about women who have been committed to forensic psychiatric care, and what consequences this might have for the care of the patients. The content of speech was examined using audio recordings and a method of analysis that was inspired by thematic analysis. The analysis identified that the staff talked about the women in a way that indicates that they expected the women to follow the rules and take responsibility for their bodies in order to be regarded as acceptable patients.

  • 4.
    Salzmann-Erikson, Martin
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science.
    Söderqvist, Cecilia
    School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, University of Mälardalen, Västerås, Sweden; Centre for Clinical Research, Västmanland County Hospital, Västerås, Sweden .
    Being subject to restrictions, limitations and disciplining: a thematic analysis of individuals’ experiences in psychiatric intensive care2017In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 38, no 7, p. 540-548Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to describe individuals' experiences of being hospitalized in psychiatric intensive care units (PICUs). Four participants who had previously been admitted in a PICU were interviewed using open-ended questions. The data were analyzed using thematic analysis. Analysis resulted in a synthesis of the various ways patients experienced limitations: (1) Descriptions of Being Limited in the Environment, (2) Descriptions of being Limited in Interactions with Staff, (3) Descriptions of Being Limited in terms of Access to Information, and (4) Descriptions of Having Limited Freedom and Autonomy. Hospitalization is experienced as a life-changing event that shows a kaleidoscopic view of limitation. We stress that the conceptualization of limitation must be considered due to its historical origins, sociopolitical aspirations, and philosophy of care. Thus, nurse practitioners and nursing leaders are advised to put the patient's experience at the center of care, and to involve and integrate patients throughout the recovery process.

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