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  • 1.
    Björn, Catrine
    et al.
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences, Uppsala University.
    Rissén, Dag
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Wadensten, Barbro
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences, Uppsala University.
    Josephson, Malin
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Uppsala University.
    Goal-setting documents did not facilitate nurses’ work at an operating department – a descriptive qualitative study2014In: Nursing Inquiry, ISSN 1320-7881, E-ISSN 1440-1800Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Both effectiveness and good care is demanded of nurses in a complex environment. The aim of the study was to describe how nurse managers and nurses interpret and are guided by stated goals in their health-care organisation, their own influence over work and obstacles to carry out work in an operating department. A qualitative study, consisting of interviews with nurse managers and nurses, and a description of goal documents and the workplace, were conducted in an operating department in Sweden. The interviews were analysed with manifest content analysis. Work was guided by daily goals for the nurses: to meet the operating schedule and to ensure good-quality patient care. The organisational goals were little known and used. The nurse managers and nurses had limited influence over their work, changes in assignments and in the operating schedule, and unsuitable environmental premises created obstacles in their work. If organisational goals are to guide work there is a need for nurse managers to transform them into understandable, applicable goals and incorporate them into nurses’ daily work. Letting the nurses influence the operating schedule could be one way to overcome obstacles in work. The study also highlights the importance of a functional physical work environment.

  • 2.
    Eriksson, Henrik
    et al.
    Röda Korset Högskola.
    Christiansen, Mats
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Holmgren, Jessica
    Röda Korset Högskola; Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Engström, Annica
    Mälardalens Högskola.
    Salzmann-Erikson, Martin
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science. Oslo University Hospital.
    Nursing under the skin: a netnographic study of metaphors and meanings in nursing tattoos2014In: Nursing Inquiry, ISSN 1320-7881, E-ISSN 1440-1800, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 318-326Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aims of this study were to present themes in nursing motifs as depicted in tattoos and to describe how it reflects upon nursing in popular culture as well as within professional nursing culture. An archival and cross-sectional observational study was conducted online to search for images of nursing tattoos that were freely available, by utilizing the netnographic methodology. The 400 images were analyzed in a process that consisted of four analytical steps focusing on metaphors and meanings in the tattoos.

    The findings present four themes: angels of mercy and domination; hegemonic nursing technology; embodying the corps; and nurses within the belly of the monster. The tattoos serve as a mirror of popular culture and the professional culture of nurses and nursing practice within the context of body art. Body art policy statements have been included in nursing personnel dress code policies. Usually these policies prohibit tattoos that are sexist, symbolize sex or could contribute and reproduce racial oppression. The results show that the tattoos can be interpreted according to several layers of meanings in relation to such policies. We therefore stress that this is an area highly relevant for further analyses in nursing research.

  • 3.
    Eriksson, Henrik
    et al.
    Department of Nursing and Care, The Red Cross University College, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Salzmann-Erikson, Martin
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science.
    The digital generation and nursing robotics: a netnographic study about nursing care robots posted on social media2017In: Nursing Inquiry, ISSN 1320-7881, E-ISSN 1440-1800, Vol. 24, no 2, article id e12165Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to present the functionality and design of nursing care robots as depicted in pictures posted on social media. A netnographic study was conducted using social media postings over a period of 3 years. One hundred and Seventy-two images were analyzed using netnographic methodology. The findings show that nursing care robots exist in various designs and functionalities, all with a common denominator of supporting the care of one's own and others' health and/or well-being as a main function. The results also show that functionality and design are influenced by recent popular sci-fi/cartoon contexts as portrayed in blockbuster movies, for example. Robots'designs seem more influenced by popular sci-fi/cartoon culture than professional nursing culture. We therefore stress that it is relevant for nursing researchers to critically reflect upon the development of nursing care robots as a thoughtful discussion about embracing technology also might generate a range of epistemological possibilities when entering a postmodern era of science and practice.

  • 4.
    Fläckman, Birgitta
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Department of Caring Sciences and Sociology, Ämnesavdelningen för vårdvetenskap. Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hansebo, Görel
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; Ersta Sköndal University College, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kihlgren, Annica
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Struggling to adapt: Caring for older persons while under threat of organizational change and termination notice : Feature2009In: Nursing Inquiry, ISSN 1320-7881, E-ISSN 1440-1800, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 82-91Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Organizational changes are common in elder care today. Such changes affect caregivers, who are essential to providing good quality care. The aim of the present study was to illuminate caregivers' experiences of working in elder care while under threat of organizational change and termination notice. Qualitative content analysis was used to examine interview data from 11 caregivers. Interviews were conducted at three occasions during a two-year period. The findings show a transition in their experiences from 'having a professional identity and self-confidence', to 'being a professional in a threatening situation caused by someone else' and to 'struggling to adapt to a changed working environment as a person and a professional'. The caregivers experienced a loss of pride and satisfaction. Previous literature indicates that this may have consequences for the quality of care and that employees may be at risk of negative health effects. However, the caregivers continued to struggle, doing their best to complete their duties. The study has implications for high-level decision-makers, managers and caregivers in similar work-life situations in that it deals with factors that facilitate or impede similar transitions.

  • 5.
    Salzmann-Erikson, Martin
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science.
    Space invaders: A netnographic study of how artefacts in nursing home environments exercise disciplining structures2016In: Nursing Inquiry, ISSN 1320-7881, E-ISSN 1440-1800, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 138-147Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aims to present culturally situated artefacts as depicted in nursing home environments and to analyze the underlying understandings of disciplining structures that are manifested in these kinds of places. Our personal geographies are often taken for granted, but when moving to a nursing home, geographies are glaringly rearranged. The study design is archival and cross-sectional observational, and the data is comprised of 38 photos and 13 videos showing environments from nursing homes. The analysis was inspired by the methodological steps in Roper’s and Shapira’s description of conducting an ethnography. The results are presented in four categories: 1) public areas, 2) orderliness, 3) staff’s places and 4) devices. The rearrangement of geography implies a degrading of agency and loss of authority over one’s place. The places should be understood in their relation to the agents and their temporarily claims upon them. The material and immaterial artefacts, that is the items, people and behaviours, transform the nursing staff into “space invaders”. Future inquiries may take into consideration the ways that space invasion in participative space intersect and construct the identities of the agents it invades upon.

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