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  • 1.
    Aasa, Ulrika
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Belastningsskadecentrum.
    Brulin, Christine
    Angquist, Karl-Axel
    Barnekow-Bergkvist, Margareta
    University of Gävle, Belastningsskadecentrum.
    Work-related psychosocial factors, worry about work conditions and health complaints among female and male ambulance personnel.2005In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 251-258Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed at investigating the relationships between work-related psychosocial factors, worry about work conditions and health complaints (sleeping problems, headache and stomach symptoms) among female and male ambulance personnel. Out of 4000 ambulance personnel in Sweden, 1500 (300 female and 1200 male personnel) were randomly selected. They answered a questionnaire including items on self-reported health complaints, individual characteristics, work-related psychological demands, decision latitude, social support and worry about work conditions. Twenty-five per cent of the female and 20% of the male ambulance personnel reported two or more health complaints sometimes or often. According to the demand-control-support questionnaire, ambulance personnel reported a generally positive psychosocial work environment, although psychological demands were associated with sleeping problems, headache and stomach symptoms among both female and male ambulance personnel. Another factor that was significantly associated with health complaints among both genders was worry about work conditions. When worry about work conditions was added to the regression models, this variable took over the role from psychological demands as a predictor for health complaints among the female ambulance personnel. The prevalence of sleeping problems, headache and stomach symptoms were significantly associated with psychological demands among both female and male ambulance personnel. Notably, worry about work conditions seems to be an important risk factor for health complaints. This suggests that worry about work conditions should not be neglected when considering risk factors among ambulance personnel.

  • 2.
    Fläckman, Birgitta
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Department of Caring Sciences and Sociology, Ämnesavdelningen för vårdvetenskap. Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Fagerberg, Ingegerd
    Department of Caring and Public Health Sciences, Mälardalen University, Västerås; Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Häggström, Elisabeth
    University of Gävle, Department of Caring Sciences and Sociology, Ämnesavdelningen för vårdvetenskap. Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kihlgren, Annica
    Department of Health Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kihlgren, Mona
    Centre of Nursing Science, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Despite shattered expectations a willingness to care for elders remains with education and clinical supervision2007In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 379-389Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite shattered expectations a willingness to care for elders remains with  education and clinical supervision The aim was to describe nursing home (NH) caregivers’ work experiences while receiving education and clinical supervision for 2 years. Working in elder care seems to be losing its attraction especially with organizational changes, cutbacks and changes in work place conditions. Clinical supervision has been reported to increase job satisfaction and creativity. Semi-structured interviews from caregivers working at an NH in Sweden were conducted, at the start and again at 12 and 24 months. At about 12 months the caregivers were informed of planned cutbacks. Content analysis was the method used to analyse the interviews from seven caregivers who participated throughout the entire period. Findings show that the value of a caring milieu was one category generated by the subcategories: experiences related to work activities and changes, and experiences related to relationships. The value of knowledge was the other category that was influenced by the experiences related to the different backgrounds and the experiences related to increased knowledge gained from the support through education and clinical supervision. The categories contained positive as well as negative influences on care. The initial focus on practical duties associated with the opening of the NH shifted towards caregiver activities with the elders they spoke warmly about. After 2 years the caregivers’ willingness to care continued despite their disappointment in the worsened working conditions. The main theme that resulted was: Despite shattered expectations a willingness to care for elders remained. Continued education and clinical supervision seems to be one factor behind the retained willingness. These findings demonstrate that support and caregiver involvement in educational programmes are important during times of change and when disappointments arise in the workplace.

  • 3.
    Fröjd, Camilla
    et al.
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Psychosocial Oncology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Lampic, Claudia
    University of Gävle, Department of Caring Sciences and Sociology, Ämnesavdelningen för vårdvetenskap. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Larsson, Gunnel
    Department of Medical Sciences, Section of Endocrine Oncology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Birgegård, Gunnar
    Department of Medical Sciences, Section of Haematology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    von Essen, Louise
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Psychosocial Oncology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Patient attitudes, behaviours, and other factors considered by doctors when estimating cancer patients' anxiety and desire for information2007In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 523-529Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim was to describe the patient attitudes, behaviours, and other factors, considered by doctors when estimating cancer patients' worry about how the disease may develop and the desire for information about the disease and its treatment. Data was gathered through semi-structured interviews with 19 doctors regarding 29 patients within endocrine oncology and haematology care, and the data were analysed by content analysis. The doctors considered the patients' verbal expressions, verbal behaviours, questions, body language, and facial expressions together with their own professional knowledge and experience, when estimating the patients' worry and desire for information. The doctors also considered contextual factors, patients' demographical factors, and medical situation when estimating the patients' worry, and also when estimating the patients' desire for information. The findings illustrate that estimating patients' worry and desire for information is a multifaceted and complex task, and that doctors consider not only the patients' verbal and nonverbal cues, but also factors, such as their own professional knowledge and experience, contextual factors, and patients' demographical variables. The findings should be communicated to doctors who meet cancer patients in medical consultations in order to illuminate the complexity of the medical consultation. The awareness of potentially important patient cues and other factors may aid doctors in their efforts to gain insight about their patients' emotions and informational needs.

  • 4.
    Fröjd, Camilla
    et al.
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Psychosocial Oncology, Uppsala University, Uppsala Science Park, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Lampic, Claudia
    University of Gävle, Department of Caring Sciences and Sociology, Ämnesavdelningen för vårdvetenskap. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Larsson, Gunnel
    Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    von Essen, Louise
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Is satisfaction with doctors' care related to health-related quality of life, anxiety and depression among patients with carcinoid tumours?: A longitudinal report2009In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 107-116Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate (i) whether specific aspects of the initial consultation (IC) and/or patients' satisfaction with doctors' care are related to health-related quality of life (HRQoL), anxiety and depression among patients with carcinoid tumours and (ii) whether patients' satisfaction with doctors' care changes over time. The study has a longitudinal design. The HRQoL and psychosocial function among patients who met the doctors showing good ability to identify patients' worry and wish for information were compared with those patients who met doctors showing less good ability. Patients' HRQoL, anxiety, depression and satisfaction with doctors' care were assessed longitudinally, shortly after each of the first four admissions to specialist care. Patients who met doctors showing good ability to identify their wish for information at the IC reported higher levels of cognitive function. Higher satisfaction with doctors' care was related to higher emotional and cognitive function, to higher global QoL, and to lower levels of problems with diarrhoea, financial difficulties, constipation, anxiety and depression shortly after each of the first three admissions, although not after the fourth admission to the specialist care. Although most patients with carcinoid tumours report high satisfaction with care, it is important to be aware of the fact that some patients may be less satisfied. Doctors should provide patients with information which matches the individual patients' needs and preferences as patients' satisfaction with doctors' provision of information is related to patients' HRQoL, anxiety and depression.

  • 5.
    Hedman, Maria
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science. Inst. för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap, Uppsala universitet.
    Pöder, Ulrika
    Inst. för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap, Uppsala universitet.
    Mamhidir, Anna-Greta
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science. Inst. för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap, Uppsala universitet.
    Nilsson, Annika
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science. Inst. för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap, Uppsala universitet.
    Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science. Inst. för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap, Uppsala universitet.
    Häggström, Elisabet
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science. Inst. för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap, Uppsala universitet.
    Life memories and the ability to act: the meaning of autonomy and participation for older people when living with chronic illness2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 824-833Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a lack of knowledge about how older people living with chronic illness describe the meaning of autonomy and participation, indicating a risk for reduced autonomy and participation in their everyday life. The purpose of this study was to describe the meaning of autonomy and participation among older people living with chronic illness in accordance with their lived experience. The design was descriptive with a phenomenological approach guided by Giorgi's descriptive phenomenological psychological method. Purposive sampling was used, and 16 older people living with chronic illness who lived in an ordinary home participated in individual interviews. The findings showed that the meaning of autonomy and participation among the older people emerged when it was challenged and evoked emotional considerations of the lived experience of having a chronic illness. It involved living a life apart, yet still being someone who is able, trustworthy and given responsibility – still being seen and acknowledged. The meaning of autonomy and participation was derived through life memories and used by the older people in everyday life for adjustment or adaption to the present life and the future. Our conclusion is that autonomy and participation were considered in relation to older people's life memories in the past, in their present situation and also their future wishes. Ability or disability is of less importance than the meaning of everyday life among older people. We suggest using fewer labels for limitations in everyday life when caring for older people and more use of the phrase ‘ability to act’ in different ways, based on older people's descriptions of the meaning of autonomy and participation.

  • 6.
    Hedov, Gerth
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Department of Caring Sciences and Sociology, Ämnesavdelningen för vårdvetenskap.
    Annerén, Göran
    Wikblad, Karin
    Swedish parents of children with Down's syndrome.2002In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 424-430Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Becoming parents of a child with Down's syndrome (DS) challenges the adjustment ability in parenthood. Individuals with higher sense of coherence (SOC) are supposed to manage stressors better than those with lower SOC. The aims of this study were to investigate parental self-perceived stress, SOC, frequency of gainful employment and amount of time spent on child care in Swedish DS parents (165 parents; 86 mothers, 79 fathers) and to compare those with control parents of healthy children (169 parents; 87 mothers, 82 fathers). The mean age of the children was 4.7 years. Parents responded to questionnaires separately including Hymovich's Parent Perception Inventory as stress measurement and Antonovsky's short version of the Orientation to Life. No differences concerning total employment rate were observed, but the DS mothers were more often employed part-time than control mothers. The DS parents did not spend more time on child care than the control parents and they did not differ in mean SOC score, but the DS parents perceived greater stress. The differences in stress, particularly between the DS and control mothers, were related to time-demanding areas. Parents with high SOC scores experienced significantly less self-perceived stress.

  • 7.
    Hägglund, Doris
    et al.
    Department of Health Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Wadensten, Barbro
    University of Gävle, Department of Caring Sciences and Sociology, Ämnesavdelningen för vårdvetenskap. Department of Health Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Fear of humiliation inhibits women's care-seeking behaviour for long-term urinary incontinence2007In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 305-312Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most women with urinary incontinence (UI) do not seek professional help. Women's experiences of their behaviour when seeking care for incontinence are important to improve understanding by nurses and encourage as well as enable women to seek help. The aim of this study was to illuminate the meaning of women's lived experiences of their behaviour when seeking care for long-term UI. Thirteen women were interviewed (range 37-52 years) who had not sought professional help for incontinence. A phenomenological hermeneutic method was used to analyse and interpret the interview texts. Three themes evolved from data: being in an affected situation, having personal beliefs about seeking care and having desired expectations about care. Being in an affected situation, means that the women were negatively affected by their long-term incontinence. Living with shame, altered sexual relationships and a need for distancing have negatively influenced their care-seeking behaviour (CSB). Having personal beliefs about seeking care means that the women had their own beliefs regarding morally acceptable behaviour for seeking care because of incontinence. This led to a toning down of their problem and a minimization of the problem associated with incontinence as it was considered to be a normal consequence of pregnancy and childbirth. Having desired expectations about care means that the women had opinions relevant to the care and felt being asked about incontinence and an understanding atmosphere should be included. The conclusion is that fear of humiliation inhibited women from seeking care for long-term UI. The findings suggest that nurses should be precise when asking about women's experiences of UI because otherwise they do not bring it up. Additionally, CSB can help nurses to explain the experience and enable women to seek help for this manageable condition.

  • 8.
    Karlsson, Margareta
    et al.
    Åbo Academy University, Vasa, Finland; University West, Trollhättan, Sweden .
    Karlsson, Christina
    Barbosa da Silva, Antonio
    Ansgar Theological Seminary, Kristiansand, Norway.
    Berggren, Ingela
    University West, Trollhättan, Sweden .
    Söderlund, Maud
    Department of Caring Science, Åbo Academy University, Vasa, Finland.
    Community nurses' experiences of ethical problems in end-of-life care in the patient's own home2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 831-838Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM:

    To gain a deeper understanding of community nurses' experiences of ethical problems in end-of-life care in the patient's own home.

    METHOD:

    Ten female nurses from five different communities with experience of end-of-life care were interviewed. A hermeneutic approach inspired by Gadamer was used to analyse the qualitative data from the interviews.

    FINDINGS:

    In the first step of interpretation, two themes emerged: Uncomfortable feelings and Lack of cooperation and in the second step, one theme Lack of security emerged. Finally, the overall interpretation revealed the theme Feelings of loss of control in end-of-life care in the patient's own home.

    CONCLUSION:

    The nurses exhibited commitment and a desire to do good when caring for patients in the end-of-life phase, even if they sometimes experienced feelings of lack of control. This implies that, when confronted with care-related issues, they have the power to both act and react. This study aimed to increase understanding of ethical problems that arise in end-of-life care in the patient's own home and revealed the need to take the patients', relatives' and nurses' perspectives on health and suffering into consideration to ensure good end-of-life home care.

  • 9. Kihlgren, Annica
    et al.
    Wimo, Anders
    Mamhidir, Anna-Greta
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science. Uppsala universitet.
    Older patients referred by community nurses to emergency departments: a descriptive cross-sectional follow-up study in a Swedish context2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 97-103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The objective of this study was to examine on what extent nursing home (NH) older patients aged 75 or older, referred to hospitals by registered nurses (RNs) in the community, utilise the emergency department (ED) over a 1-year period and for what reason. A further objective was to identify factors that may explain these referrals. Methods: A cross-sectional follow-up study, examining older patients' disabilities, resources and needs, was carried out in a county in Sweden. Assessments were made using Residents Assessment Instrument/Minimum Data Set, among 719 individuals in 24 NHs and the RNs' documentation were followed. Results: The result showed that of 719 residents, 209 accounted for 314 referrals to an ED over the 1-year period. No gender differences were observed. The main reasons for referrals were falls (23%), cardiovascular problems (16%), gastrointestinal problems (12%) and infections (11%). Most of the referrals (65%) were made on weekdays during daytime hours. In 62% of the cases, there had been a consultation with a physician prior to the referral. The nursing documentation was poor in connection with the referral. Conclusion: Older patients with dementia diseases were significant less refereed and questions are raised whether this group is undetected and undertreated, and therefore, it is important with further investigation. 

  • 10. Kristensson, Per
    et al.
    Öhlund, Lennart S
    University of Gävle, Department of Education and Psychology, Ämnesavdelningen för folkhälsovetenskap.
    Swedish upper secondary school pupils' sense of coherence, coping resources and aggressiveness in relation to educational track and performance2005In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 77-84Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The health of an individual depends on how well he or she can handle various stressors in his or her environment. One vulnerable period occurs during the transition from child to adult. The overall aim of this research project was to determine whether differences in the ability to deal with stress are related to various health indicators, aggression, and school marks during primary and upper secondary school. Data were collected class-wise and 253 Swedish upper secondary school pupils participated. Three well-established questionnaires [Sense of Coherence (SOC), Coping Resources Inventory (CRI) and Aggression Questionnaire (AQ)] were used. In addition, blood pressure, teacher evaluation and school marks were collected. Some demographic data such as gender, age and type of study programme were also collected. Both SOC and Coping Resources Inventory correlated significantly positively with many of the primary and upper secondary marks, while the AQ had significantly negative correlations with the mark. Females obtained higher values than males in Coping Resources Inventory, but lower in SOC and AQ.

  • 11.
    Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science. University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Section of Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Lindqvist, Ragny
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science. University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science.
    Nilsson, Annika
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science. University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science.
    Relationships between coping, coping resources and quality of life in patients with chronic illness: a pilot study2011In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 476-483Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden there are approximately about 3500 end-stage renal disease and 250 000 chronic heart failure patients. 

    Objectives: The original purpose of the study was to determine differences between two groups of patients with chronic illness (end-stage renal disease and chronic heart failure) regarding the following study variables: coping, sense of coherence, self-efficacy and quality of life. Following this, the aim was to explore the relationships between demographic variables (sex, age, educational level and living area) and quality of life as well as between coping, sense of coherence, self-efficacy and quality of life for the combined sample of patients with end-stage renal disease and chronic heart failure.

    Methods: A comparative and correlative design was used with a sample of 100 patients (n=41 end-stage renal disease, n=59 chronic heart failure). The data were collected during 2004, using four standardized questionnaires and regression analyses were conducted.

    Results: No significant differences were found between the two groups. Positive correlations were identified between sense of coherence, general self-efficacy and quality of life, whereas negative correlations emerge between emotion-focused coping, sense of coherence, general self-efficacy and quality of life. Sense of coherence, general self-efficacy and emotion-focused coping explained 40% of the variance in quality of life. Those with low sense of coherence and general self-efficacy showed negative correlations between emotion-focused coping and quality of life, whereas no such correlations were shown for those with high values on sense of coherence and general self-efficacy.    

    Conclusions: The present results on coping and quality of life correspond with previous research regarding how other groups with chronic illness handled their daily life. Preliminary results indicate that how individuals tackle their present situation is more important than which chronic illness they have. Women used more emotion-focused coping than men, which constitute an important finding for further research.

  • 12.
    Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Department of Caring Sciences and Sociology, Ämnesavdelningen för vårdvetenskap. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Section of Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Löfmark, Rurik
    Centre for Bioethics, Karolinska Institutet, Uppsala University, Solna, Sweden.
    Carlsson, Marianne
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Section of Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Managing consequences and finding hope: experiences of Swedish women and men 4-6 months after myocardial infarction2008In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 367-375Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research has focused more on symptoms, risk factors and treatment, than on individuals’ experiences of illness and recovery after myocardial infarction (MI). Therefore, the aim of the study was to describe the experiences of present everyday life of women and men 4–6 months after MI and their expectations for the future. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 20 women and 19 men from January 2000 to November 2001. Data were analysed with content analysis. Two themes, ‘Managing consequences of MI’ and ‘Finding a meaning in what had happened’, were generated. The first theme reveals that many of the patients had not established a stable health condition, even if symptoms and emotional distress had diminished over time. They had to manage health problems, lifestyle modifications, emotional reactions and changes in social life. The support from their social network encouraged them to move on. The second theme shows that patients also found positive consequences of what they had gone through, new life values and hopes in the future. The conclusions were that most of the patients moved on and began to regain a balance in everyday life, but some patients still struggled hard to find this balance. Those patients experienced large difficulties with managing their everyday life and felt a lack of support from their social network. Health professionals can be an important resource in helping patients in their adaptation to changes if they are more sensitive to patients’ needs of support both in a short- and long-term perspective.

  • 13.
    Nilsson, Annika
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Department of Caring Sciences and Sociology, Ämnesavdelningen för vårdvetenskap.
    Sjödén, Per-Olow
    Inst.folkhälsovetenskap och vårdvetenskap Uppsala.
    Dahl, Joanne
    Inst.för psykologi Uppsala.
    Denison, Eva
    University of Gävle, Department of Caring Sciences and Sociology, Ämnesavdelningen för vårdvetenskap.
    Factors related to long-duration pain and sick leave among Swedish staff working in the public health service2005In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 419-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study was to provide information about factors related to long-duration pain (LDP) (>3 months), sick leave (SL) and long sick leave (LSL) (>3 months) among staff in the community health services. The specific research question was: To what extent do data on activity, physical function, pain severity, psychological/cognitive factors, expectations of LDP, expectations to be working within 6 months and work satisfaction predict LDP, SL and LSL respectively? Logistic regression analyses were used to test predicted membership in the groups LDP, SL and LSL. In this context prediction refers to statistical prediction only, due to the cross-sectional design. Staff (n = 914) in the public health services in a medium-sized Swedish city completed a questionnaire during the spring of 2000. The results show that musculoskeletal pain and SL for this occupational group are common. Pain severity, expectations of LDP and fear-avoidance increased the odds of being in the LDP group, while kinesiophobia decreased the odds. Pain severity and kinesiophobia increased the odds of being in the SL group, while expectations to be working in 6 months decreased the odds. Only expectations to be working in 6 months predicted membership in the LSL group, decreasing the odds. Although some caution is warranted concerning the representativity of the sample, the results indicate that expectations about pain duration and ability to work are important psychosocial factors in LDP and LSL.

  • 14.
    Olsson, Annakarin
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science.
    Engström, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science.
    Skovdahl, Kirsti
    Örebro Universitet.
    Lampic, Claudia
    Karolinska Institutet.
    My, your and our needs for safety and security: relatives’ reflections on using information and communication technology in dementia care2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 104-112Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Ristiniemi, Heli
    et al.
    Stress Clinic, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Perski, Aleksander
    Stress Research Institute Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lyskov, Eugene
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Emtner, Margareta
    Department of Medical Sciences and Neuroscience Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Hyperventilation and exhaustion syndrome2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 657-664Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chronic stress is among the most common diagnoses in Sweden, most commonly in the form of exhaustion syndrome (ICD-10 classification – F43.8). The majority of patients with this syndrome also have disturbed breathing (hyperventilation). The aim of this study was to investigate the association between hyperventilation and exhaustion syndrome. Thirty patients with exhaustion syndrome and 14 healthy subjects were evaluated with the Nijmegen Symptom Questionnaire (NQ). The participants completed questionnaires about exhaustion, mental state, sleep disturbance, pain and quality of life. The evaluation was repeated 4 weeks later, after half of the patients and healthy subjects had engaged in a therapy method called ‘Grounding’, a physical exercise inspired by African dance. The patients reported significantly higher levels of hyperventilation as compared to the healthy subjects. All patients’ average score on NQ was 26.57 ± 10.98, while that of the healthy subjects was 15.14 ± 7.89 (t = −3.48, df = 42, p < 0.001). The NQ scores correlated strongly with two measures of exhaustion (Karolinska Exhaustion Scale KES r = 0.772, p < 0.01; Shirom Melamed Burnout Measure SMBM r = 0.565, p < 0.01), mental status [Hospital Anxiety and Depression Score (HADS) depression r = 0.414, p < 0.01; HADS anxiety r = 0.627, p < 0.01], sleep disturbances (r = −0.514, p < 0.01), pain (r = −.370, p < 0.05) and poor well-being (Medical Outcomes Survey Short Form 36 questionnaire- SR Health r = −0.529, p < 0.05). In the logistic regression analysis, the variance in the scores from NQ were explained to a high degree (R2 = 0.752) by scores in KES and HADS. The brief Grounding training contributed to a near significant reduction in hyperventilation (F = 2.521, p < 0.124) and to significant reductions in exhaustion scores and scores of depression and anxiety. The conclusion is that hyperventilation is common in exhaustion syndrome patients and that it can be reduced by systematic physical therapy such as Grounding.

  • 16.
    Salzmann-Erikson, Martin
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science.
    Lagerqvist, Linda
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Pousette, Sandra
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Keep calm and have a good night: nurses' strategies to promote inpatients' sleep in the hospital environment2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 356-364Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patients in the hospital environment are suffering from disrupted sleep, which adversely affects their recovery process, health and well-being. The aim of this study was to explore nurses' experiences and their strategies to promote inpatients' sleep. An empirical qualitative design was applied. Eight nurses at a hospital in Sweden were purposefully selected to be included in semi-structured interviews. Burnard's method for inductively analysing interview transcripts was applied. The findings are presented in four categories: (i) prevention and planning as a sleep-promoting nursing strategy; (ii) adaptation of the environment as a sleep-promoting nursing strategy; (iii) use of drugs as a sleep-promoting nursing strategy; and (iv) caring conversation as a sleep-promoting nursing strategy. Using strategies to promote sleep is important as it affects the recovery of the patients. We argue for the use of simple strategies of sensory reduction as cost-effective sleep-promoting measures that also reduce the use of sedative drugs.

  • 17.
    Swenne, Christine L.
    et al.
    Uppsala Universitet.
    Skytt, Bernice
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science. Uppsala universitet.
    The ward round: patient experiences and barriers to participation2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 297-304Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Patients' participation is essential to their well-being and sense of coherence, as well as to their understanding of and adherence to prescribed treatments. Ward rounds serve as a forum for sharing information between patient and caregiver. The purpose of the ward round is to obtain information and plan medical and nursing care through staff-patient communication.

    AIM AND OBJECTIVE:

    The aim and objective of this study was to investigate patients' experiences during the ward round and their ability to participate in their care.

    METHODOLOGICAL DESIGN AND JUSTIFICATION:

    The study was qualitative and descriptive in design. Fourteen inpatients at a cardiovascular ward were interviewed. Qualitative content analysis was used for the analysis.

    ETHICAL ISSUES AND APPROVAL:

    The ethics of scientific work were adhered to. Each study participant gave his/her informed consent based on verbal and written information. The study was approved by the Research Ethics Committee at Uppsala University.

    RESULTS:

    The analysis revealed one theme and three subthemes related to patients' experiences of ward rounds. The main theme was handling of information from the daily ward round while waiting for private consultation. The subthemes were making the best of the short time spent on ward rounds; encountering traditional roles and taking comfort in staff competency; and being able to choose the degree to which one participates in the decision-making process.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Several aspects of traditional ward round routines could be improved in regard to the two-way information exchange process between caregivers and patient. Patients' and caregivers' ability to communicate their goals and the environment in which the communication occurs are of great importance. The information provided by nurses is easier to understand than that provided by physicians. The atmosphere must be open; the patient should be treated with empathy by staff; and patients' right to participate must be acknowledged by all healthcare professionals involved.

  • 18.
    Wadensten, Barbro
    University of Gävle, Department of Caring Sciences and Sociology, Ämnesavdelningen för vårdvetenskap. Department of Health Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    An analysis of psychosocial theories of ageing and their relevance to practical gerontological nursing in Sweden2006In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 347-354Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Theories exist to challenge current practice, create new approaches to practice and remodel the structure of rules and principles. One question is whether nurses could find in psychosocial theories of ageing a theoretical foundation on which to base support of older people in their ageing process. AIM: The aim of the present paper was to analyse five psychosocial theories of ageing and to discover what they could mean for gerontological nursing in Sweden. METHOD: A literature search was conducted to find original works. Research questions inspired by Fawcett's framework guided the analysis. FINDINGS: Psychosocial theories of ageing cover different aspects of the ageing process, but do not address crucial issues regarding the attitudes and structure of good nursing care. These theories provide no clear guidance on how to care for older people and how to support them in their ageing process. However, the analysis did show that the theories contain underlying values that influence society and staff as regards their views on the ageing process and how care of older people should be carried out. Nursing interventions to support ageing will be quite different depending on the theoretical perspective taken by nurses. CONCLUSIONS: There is a need to translate the ageing theories into guidelines, so that staff in gerontological care will have tools to use in practice irrespective of which theoretical perspective they choose to use in care. This could also promote care that is tailored to each individual older person.

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