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  • 1.
    Fröjd, Camilla
    et al.
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Psyc hosocial oncology, Uppsala Un iversity, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Larsson, Gunnel
    Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala Un iversity, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Lampic, Claudia
    University of Gävle, Department of Caring Sciences and Sociology, Ämnesavdelningen för vårdvetenskap. Department of Public Health and Caring Sc iences, Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    von Essen, Louise
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Psyc hosocial oncology, Uppsala Un iversity, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Health related quality of life and psychosocial function among patients with carcinoid tumours: a longitudinal, prospective, and comparative study2007In: Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, ISSN 1477-7525, E-ISSN 1477-7525, Vol. 5, article id 18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The aim was to investigate HRQoL and psychosocial function among patients with carcinoid tumours, longitudinally and prospectively, and to compare HRQoL among patients with carcinoid tumours to that of the Swedish general population. The aim was also to investigate the prevalence of distress during the first year after diagnosis. Methods: At four assessments during the first year after diagnosis, HRQoL was measured by the EORTC QLQ-C30 3.0, anxiety and depression by the HADS, and prevalence, and worst aspects of distress by an interview guide. ANOVA was performed in order to study changes over time with regard to HRQoL, anxiety and depression. Comparisons regarding HRQoL between patients and the Swedish population were made by the use of one-sample t-tests and changes over time regarding the prevalence of distress was investigated by means of Cochran's Q. Results: High levelsof physical-, emotional-, cognitive-, and social function and somewhat lower levels of role function and global quality of life were reported at all assessments. Role- and emotional function increased over time. Patients reported lower role function and global quality of life and more problems with fatigue and diarrhoea than the Swedish general population, at all assessments. Fatigue, limitations to work and pursue daily activities, and worry that the illness will get worse were among the most prevalent aspects at all assessments. At all assessments the majority reported worrying about the family's situation, the ability to care for the family, and worrying before the check-up. Conclusion: It is concluded that HRQoL and psychosocial function among patients with carcinoid tumours remains stable during the first year, that the patients report a lower HRQoL than the Swedish general population, and that a majority of the patients report a number of aspects of emotional distress. In the clinical care, it should be considered that the majority of patients report not only fatigue and diarrhoea but also worries about their prognosis, their families, tests, and examinations. Efforts to reduce these worries should be made.

  • 2.
    Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science. Uppsala universitet.
    Ternesten-Hasséus, Ewa
    Department of Respiratory Medicine and Allergology, Institution of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    A study of two generic health-related quality of life questionnaires - Nottingham Health Profile and Short-Form 36 Health Survey - and of coping in patients with sensory hyperreactivity2013In: Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, ISSN 1477-7525, E-ISSN 1477-7525, Vol. 11, article id 182Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Sensory hyperreactivity (SHR) is one explanation for airway symptoms induced by chemicals and scents. Little is known about health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and coping, in this group of patients. A study was done in patients with SHR to (1) compare the Nottingham Health Profile (NHP) and the Short-Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36) in regard to their suitability, validity, reliability, and acceptability; (2) evaluate how the patients cope with the illness; (3) assess whether there are differences between women and men with respect to HRQOL and coping; and (4) assess whether there are differences between patients and normative data with respect to HRQOL and coping.

    Methods

    A total of 115 patients (91 women) with SHR were asked to answer five questionnaires: a study-specific questionnaire, the Chemical Sensitivity Scale for Sensory Hyperreactivity (CSS-SHR), the NHP, the SF-36, and the Jalowiec Coping Scale-60.

    Results

    Eighty-three patients (72%; 70 women) completed all questionnaires. The SF-36 scores were less skewed and more homogeneously distributed and showed fewer floor and ceiling effects than the NHP scores. The SF-36 was also discriminated better between patients with high and low CSS-SHR scores. The reliability standard for both questionnaires was satisfactory. There were no gender differences in HRQOL. Patients with SHR had significantly lower HRQOL scores than the normative data in comparable domains of the NHP and the SF-36: emotional reactions/mental health, energy/vitality, physical mobility/functioning, and pain/bodily pain. In social isolation/functioning, the results were different; the NHP scores were similar to the normative data and the SF-36 scores were lower. The most commonly used coping styles were optimistic, self-reliant, and confrontational. Women used optimistic coping more than men. Compared with the normative group, patients with SHR used confrontational and optimistic coping more and emotive coping less.

    Conclusions

    The current findings showed that both the NHP and the SF-36 were reliable instruments; but the results suggest that the SF-36 is a more sensitive instrument than the NHP for elucidating HRQOL in patients with SHR. Patients with SHR experienced a poor HRQOL and they followed the Western tradition of preferring problem-focused coping strategies to palliative and emotive strategies.

  • 3.
    Svedberg, Pia
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Inst för klinisk neurovetenskap, sektionen för försäkringsmedicin.
    Eriksson, Mårten
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Psychology.
    Boman, Eva
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Psychology.
    Associations between scores of psychosomatic health symptoms and health-related quality of life in children and adolescents2013In: Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, ISSN 1477-7525, E-ISSN 1477-7525, Vol. 11, no 176Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The aims of the present study are to investigate whether there are differences in health-related quality of life (HRQoL) between girls and boys in two different age groups, to study how much of children’s variance in HRQoL can be explained by common psychosomatic health symptoms, and to examine whether the same set of psychosomatic symptoms can explain differences in HRQoL, both between girls and boys and between older and younger school children.

    Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted of 253 children, 99 of ages 11-12 years (n=51 girls, n=48 boys) and 154 of ages 15-16 years (n=82 girls, n=72 boys), in Swedish schools. The KIDSCREEN-52 instrument, which covers 10 dimensions of HRQoL and additional questions about psychosomatic health symptoms, were used. Analyses of variance were conducted to investigate differences between the genders and age groups, and in interaction effects on the KIDSCEEN-52 dimensions. Regression analyses were used to investigate the impacts of psychosomatic symptoms on gender and age group differences in HRQoL.

    Results: Boys rated themselves higher than girls on the KIDSCREEN dimensions: physical and psychological well-being, moods and emotions, self-perception, and autonomy. Main effects of age group were found for physical well-being, psychological well-being, moods and emotions, self-perception, autonomy, and school environment, where younger children rated their HRQoL more highly than those aged 15-16 years. Girls rated their moods and emotions dramatically lower than boys in the older age group, but the ratings of emotional status were more similar between genders at younger ages. Psychosomatic symptoms explained between 27% and 50% of the variance in the children’s HRQoL. Sleeping difficulties were a common problem for both girls and boys. Depression and concentration difficulties were particularly associated with HRQoL among girls whereas stomach aches were associated with HRQoL among boys.  

    Conclusions: Girls and adolescents experience poorer HRQoL than boys and younger children, but having psychosomatic symptoms seem to explain a substantial part of the variation. Strategies to promote health among school children, in particular to alleviate sleep problems among all children, depression and concentration difficulties among girls, and stomach aches among boys, are of great importance.

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