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  • 1.
    Daerga, Laila
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research. Southern Lapland Research Department, Vilhelmina, Sweden.
    Edin-Liljegren, Anette
    Southern Lapland Research Department, Vilhelmina, Sweden.
    Sjölander, Per
    University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research. Southern Lapland Research Department, Vilhelmina, Sweden.
    Quality of life in relation to physical, psychosocial and socio-economic conditions among reindeer-herding Sami2008In: International Journal of Circumpolar Health, ISSN 1239-9736, Vol. 67, no 1, 8-26 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives. To analyse different aspects of health-related quality of life factors among members of reindeer-herding families.

    Study design. Cross-sectional study based on data from a comprehensive survey.

    Methods. The health-related quality of life (SF-36) factors were analysed on 99 (56 men, 43 women) adult members of reindeer-herding families. Comparisons were made between the reindeer-herding family members and a Swedish reference population. Associations between mental and physical component summary measures and a number of sociodemographic, biomedical, physical, psychosocial and socio-economic variables were analysed with multivariate regression statistics.

    Results. Men scored higher than women on physical and social functioning and vitality. The average scores on the subscales for the reindeer-herding family members were similar to those of

    the Swedish reference population, except for reindeer-herding men who scored higher on physical functioning and lower on bodily pain. For women, the quality of life was related to age, sense of coherence, life-style and behavioural variables, as well as to issues such as diseases among close relatives, social networks and the economy of their business. For men, it was mainly related to musculoskeletal pain conditions, age, sense of coherence and physical and psychosocial working conditions.

    Conclusions. Men and women of the reindeer-herding families need partly different conditions to enjoy a high quality of life. From the results, it might be predicted that poor somatic and psychosocial health, increased intrusion from exploiters on the grazing land and declining profit in reindeer husbandry constitute important threats to a good quality of life among members of reindeer-herding families

  • 2.
    Daerga, Laila
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Belastningsskadecentrum.
    Edin-Liljegren, Anette
    Sjölander, Per
    University of Gävle, Belastningsskadecentrum.
    Work-related musculoskeletal pain among reindeer herding Sami in Sweden: a pilot study on causes and prevention2004In: International Journal of Circumpolar Health, ISSN 1239-9736, Vol. 63 Suppl 2, 343-348 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. To investigate the prevalence and to identify causes of musculoskeletal pain (MSP) among reindeer herding Sami, and to evaluate the impact on the MSP symptoms elicited by an intervention-pre- vention programme (lP programme). Study Design. A prospective cohort study in which alterations in MSP symptoms were documented over a two-year period. Methods. Data were collected from 51 rein- deer herders (26 men, 25 w omen) before and af ter a two-year lP programme. Information on MSP cha- racteristics (affected body regions, pain duration and pain intensity) and exposure to a number of phy- sical and psychosocial risk factors were collected as part of comprehensive health examinations. Cli- nical examinations and interviews complemented self-reported data collected through questionnaires. Results. MSP symptoms were prevalent, both among w omen and men. High exposure to physical risk factors, to a large extent related to extensive use of snowmobiles and motorcycles, was the main cau- se of MSP among men, while psychosocial risk factors were suggested to be more important among wo- men. About one-third of the reindeer herders reported fewer MSP symptoms as a resull of the lP programme. Conclusions. This pilot study suggests that it is possible to reduce the number and the se- verity of the MSP symptoms among reindeer herders by implementing suitably tailored intervention- prevention measures.

  • 3. Edin-Liljegren, Anette
    et al.
    Hassler, Sven
    Sjölander, Per
    University of Gävle, Belastningsskadecentrum.
    Daerga, Laila
    University of Gävle, Belastningsskadecentrum.
    Risk factors for cardiovascular diseases among Swedish Sami: a controlled cohort study2004In: International Journal of Circumpolar Health, ISSN 1239-9736, Vol. 63 Suppl 2, 292-297 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. To investigate the occurrence of clinical, psychosocial and behavioural risk factors for cardiovascular di seases (C VD) among reindeer herding (RS) and non-reindeer herding Sami (NRS). Study Design. A retrospective cohort study, comparing risk factors behind C VD between Sami and non-Sami, RS and NRS, and Sami men and w omen. Methods. A cohort of 611 Swedish Sami (276 men and 335 w omen) was constructed from national population registers. A twice as large control co- hort of non-Sami was created, matched by age, gender and area of residence. Information on risk factors was obtained from a database containing clinical and psychosocial-behavioural data from a regional C VD preventive programme for the period 1990-2001. Results. The Sami and thenon-Sa- mi showed similar risk factor patterns. The main differences were related to working conditions and lifestyle factors of the RS. The RS men had lower blood pressure, were more physically active and had higher job demand and decision latitude. The RS w omen showed more negative scores on the in- dices of the job strain model. Conclusions. Previously reported differences in C VD mortality between Sami and non-Sami, and Sami men and w omen, can only partly be explained by different exposure to the psychosocial and behaviour risk factors investigated in this study.

  • 4. Hassler, Sven
    et al.
    Sjölander, Per
    University of Gävle, Belastningsskadecentrum.
    Johansson, Robert
    Grönberg, Henrik
    Damber, Lena
    Fatal accidents and suicide among reindeer-herding Sami in Sweden2004In: International Journal of Circumpolar Health, ISSN 1239-9736, Vol. 63 Suppl 2, 384-388 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. Over the last decades, reindeer-herding management has experienced drarnatic changes, e.g. increased motorization and socio-econornic pressure. The airn of the present study was to investigate whether these changes have increased the risk of fatal, work-related accidents and suicide between 1961 and 2000. Study design and methods. A c oh ort containing 7,482 members of reindeer-herding Sami families was extracted from national population registers. Information on fatal accidents and suicide was obtained from the Swedish Causes of Death Register, and compared to the expected number of deaths in a dernographica11y matched control population of non-Sami. Results. The ffiale reindeer her- ding Sami showed a significantly increased risk of dying from accidents such as vehicle accidents and poisoning. No significant increased risk of suicide was observed. A comparison between the periods of 1961-1980 and 1981- 2000 showed non-significant differences in risk, although a trend towards incre- ased risks was observed for most types of external causes of death except suicide. Conclusions. It is suggested that the increased socio-econornic pressure and the extensive use of terrain vehicles have increased the risk for fatal accidents arnong Swedish reindeer herders, and that commercial reindeer ma- nagement is one of the most dangerous occupations in Sweden

  • 5. Hassler, Sven
    et al.
    Soininen, Leena
    Sjölander, Per
    University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Pukkala, Eero
    Cancer among the Sami: a review on the Norwegian, Swedish and Finnish Sami populations2008In: International Journal of Circumpolar Health, ISSN 1239-9736, Vol. 67, no 5, 421-432 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives. The Sami are the Indigenous people of the northernmost parts of Sweden, Finland and Norway, and of the Kola Peninsula of Russia. The present review summarizes the main results from studies on cancer morbidity and mortality among the Sami and discusses these results in relation to exposure of known risk factors.

    Study Design. Literature review.

    Methods. A systematic search over the time period 1966–2008 for relevant articles was conducted on MEDLINE. Updates and recalculations of some of the results from the original data were also done.

    Results. Nine articles whose main focus is on cancer incidence or mortality among the Sami were identified. In all studies, the overall incidence of cancer or cancer mortality was lower among the Sami in comparison with the national populations. The differences were less striking in relation to regional reference populations, but the rates were still significantly lower for all populations of Sami, except for Swedish Sami women. Beyond the general trend of a lower cancer incidence among the Sami, there were some notable differences between the various Sami subpopulations.

    Conclusions. The risk of developing and dying from cancer is low among the Sami. A life-style that includes cancer-protective factors, such as certain dietary components and physical activity, is the most likely explanation for the lower incidence of cancer among the Sami.

  • 6.
    Kaiser, Niclas
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Division of Psychiatry, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Sjölander, Per
    University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research. University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences. Southern Lapland Research Department, Vilhelmina, Sweden.
    Liljegren, Annette Edin
    Southern Lapland Research Department, Vilhelmina, Sweden.
    Jacobsson, Lars
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Division of Psychiatry, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Renberg, Ellinor Salander
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Division of Psychiatry, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Depression and anxiety in the reindeer-herding Sami population of Sweden2010In: International Journal of Circumpolar Health, ISSN 1239-9736, Vol. 69, no 4, 383-393 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives. The objective of this study was to investigate symptoms and predicting factors of depression and anxiety among reindeer-herding Sami in Sweden. Study design. A total of 319 reindeer-herding Sami (168 men, 151 women) were compared with urban and rural reference populations comprising 1,393 persons (662 men, 731 women). Methods. A cross-sectional questionnaire study on mental health, which included the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Data were analysed with regard to population, gender, age group, education and work-related stress. Results. The Sami population disclosed higher mean values for both depression and anxiety than the reference groups, with Sami men reporting the highest rates. Work-related stress was associated with anxiety and depression in the Sami group. Conclusions. By comparing Sami men and women with reference groups of men and women living in urban and rural areas in northern Sweden, this study identified that reindeer-herding Sami men require special attention with regard to mental health problems.

  • 7.
    Ross, Alastair B
    et al.
    Department of Genetics and Pathology, Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala University, Sweden; Nestlé Research Center, Lausanne, Switzerland.
    Johansson, Åsa
    Department of Genetics and Pathology, Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Vavruch-Nilsson, Veronika
    Department of Genetics and Pathology, Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Hassler, Sven
    Southern Lappland Research Department, Vilhelmina, Sweden.
    Sjölander, Per
    University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research. Southern Lappland Research Department, Vilhelmina, Sweden.
    Edin-Liljegren, Anette
    Southern Lappland Research Department, Vilhelmina, Sweden.
    Gyllensten, Ulf
    Department of Genetics and Pathology, Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Adherence to a traditional lifestyle affects food and nutrient intake among modern Swedish Sami2009In: International Journal of Circumpolar Health, ISSN 1239-9736, Vol. 68, no 4, 372-385 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives. To compare the nutrient and food intake of Sami still engaged in reindeer herding (traditional lifestyle or reindeer-herding Sami [RS]) and Sami not involved in reindeer herding (industrialized lifestyle or non-reindeer-herding Sami [NRS]) with other northern Swedish populations. Study design. Cross-sectional analysis of data from a prospective cardiovascular intervention program in northern Sweden. Methods. Data were used from a prospective cardiovascular intervention program in northern Sweden. Sami recruited into this study were divided according to whether they were involved in reindeer herding (traditional lifestyle, RS) (66 females, 79 males) or not (NRS) (255 females, 195 males), and compared to non-Sami from the same area taking part in the same study (controls) (499 females, 501 males). Subjects completed a Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ) and clinical parameters were analysed. Results. RS had a higher overall intake of energy for both females (P<0.01) and males (P<0.05), but not total food intake compared to controls and NRS. The overall Sami diet was characterized by a higher proportion of energy from protein and fat. RS had a lower energy adjusted intake of vitamins A and E, and fibre, and a higher intake of sodium. RS and NRS both had a lower intake of vegetables and a higher intake of meat, and for RS, fish. Nutrient and food-intake patterns were similar for males and females. Conclusions. Classification of Sami into RS and NRS indicates that a traditional lifestyle defined by occupation is reflected in differences in food and nutrient intake.

  • 8.
    Soares, Joaquim
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Macassa, Gloria
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Miranda, Jamilette
    Viitasara, Eija
    Mid Sweden Univ, Dept Hlth Sci, Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Health among lifetime victimized men2007In: International Journal of Circumpolar Health, ISSN 1239-9736, Vol. 66, no 4, 351-364 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives. We examined differences in demographics/socio-economics, lifestyles and mental/physical health between victimized/non-victimized men, and identified/quantified factors associated with mental/physical health.Study design. The study design was cross-sectional.Methods. The men were assessed in various areas (e.g., depression) by means of a questionnaire.Results. The univariate analyses showed that victims compared with non-victims were younger. They also had higher intermediate education levels, were more often blue-collar/low white-collar workers, were on student allowances and financially strained, smoked more, had a lower BMI, and reported headaches, depression, tension and cognitive difficulties more frequently. The regression analyses showed that financial strain rather than violence was a more important factor for ill-health. Only headaches and cognitive difficulties were associated with violence.Conclusions. Quite an number of men were in a poor physical/mental state, but there were few differences between victims/non-victims. Financial strain was determined to be a more important factor for ill-health than violence. Our data indicate that violence had little effect on men's health. Our findings do not generally support a relationship between poor health and the abuse of men.

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