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  • 1. Bellamy, Chyrell D.
    et al.
    Jarrett, Nichole C.
    Mowbray, Orion
    MacFarlane, Peter
    Mowbray, Carol T.
    University of Michigan.
    Holter, Mark
    University of Kansas.
    Relevance of spirituality for people with mental illness attending consumer-centered services2007In: Psychiatric rehabilitation journal, ISSN 1095-158X, E-ISSN 1559-3126, Vol. 30, no 4, p. 287-294Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Spirituality has been cited in the literature as having a positive effect on mental health outcomes. This paper explores the relationship of spirituality to demographic, psychiatric illness history and psychological constructs for people with mental illness (N=1835) involved in consumer-centered services (CCS-Clubhouses and Consumer run drop-in centers). Descriptive statistics indicate that spirituality is important for at least two thirds of the members in the study. Members primarily indicated participation in public spiritual activities (i.e., church, bible study groups), followed by private activities (prayer, reading the bible, and meditation) (both of which were centered on belief in the transcendent). A logistic regression analysis was done to explore variables related to spirituality (i.e., demographics, psychiatric illness history, and psychological constructs). Results suggest that age, gender, having psychotic symptoms, having depressive symptoms, and having a higher global quality of life, hope and sense of community were all significant correlates of spirituality. 

  • 2. Fukui, Sadaaki
    et al.
    Davidson, Lori J
    Holter, Mark
    Rapp, Charles A
    Pathways to Recovery (PTR): Impact of peer-led group participation on mental health recovery outcomes2010In: Psychiatric rehabilitation journal, ISSN 1095-158X, E-ISSN 1559-3126, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 42-48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This study examined the positive effects on recovery outcomes for people with severe and persistent mental illness using peer-led groups based on Pathways to Recovery: A Strengths Recovery Self-Help Workbook (PTR). PTR translates the evidence-supported practice of the Strengths Model into a self-help approach, allowing users to identify and pursue life goals based on personal and environmental strengths. Methods: A single-group pretest-posttest research design was applied. Forty-seven members in 6 consumer-run organizations in one Midwestern state participated in a PTR peer-led group, completing a baseline survey before the group and again at the completion of the 12-week sessions. The Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, the General Self-Efficacy Scale, Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support, the Spirituality Index of Well-Being, and the Modified Colorado Symptom Index were employed as recovery outcomes. Paired Hotelling's T-square test was conducted to examine the mean differences of recovery outcomes between the baseline and the completion of the group. Results: Findings revealed statistically significant improvements for PTR participants in self-esteem, self-efficacy, social support, spiritual well-being, and psychiatric symptoms. Conclusions: This initial research is promising for establishing PTR as an important tool for facilitating recovery using a peer-led group format. The provision of peer-led service has been emphasized as critical to integrating consumers' perspectives in recovery-based mental health services. Given the current federal funding stream for peer services, continued research into PTR and other peer-led services becomes more important. Copyright 2010 Trustees of Boston University.

  • 3.
    Holter, Mark
    et al.
    University of Michigan.
    Mowbray, Carol T
    University of Michigan.
    Consumer-run drop-in centers: Program operations and costs2005In: Psychiatric rehabilitation journal, ISSN 1095-158X, E-ISSN 1559-3126, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 323-331Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In-depth phone surveys were conducted with 32 consumer-run drop-in centers in Michigan. Results indicate that centers serve a diverse array of consumers at an average cost of about $8 daily per person. Funding levels, salaries, and services are quite heterogeneous among centers. Those with higher funding levels, greater involvement with other human service agencies, and higher overall CMH county budgets differed significantly in total services and activities provided than those centers with less of each of these resources. Daily attendance was predicted by other-agency involvement, participation of volunteer personnel, and negative neighborhood context.

  • 4.
    Mowbray, Carol T
    et al.
    University of Michigan.
    Megivern, Deborah
    Holter, Mark
    University of Michigan.
    Supported education programming for adults with psychiatric disabilities: Results from a national survey2003In: Psychiatric rehabilitation journal, ISSN 1095-158X, E-ISSN 1559-3126, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 159-167Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the last 10 years, supported education (SEd) programs have been the topic of many journal publications and conference presentations, but little is known about their numbers and types across the U.S. This article reports the results of a national survey of all known SEd programs, numbering over 100. The largest number was associated with clubhouses, where full and partial SEd models could be identified. On-site supported education programs were located in community colleges and universities. A dozen "free-standing" programs were also identified. Analyses documented differences across program types in services provided, budget amounts and sources, and coordination with mental health and higher educational institutions. If supported education is to move beyond a specialty program in mental health, providers need to do more to market these services and to work collaboratively with stakeholder groups to expand supported education programming.

  • 5. Starnino, Vincent R
    et al.
    Mariscal, Susana
    Holter, Mark
    Davidson, Lori J
    Cook, Karen S
    Fukui, Sadaaki
    Rapp, Charles A
    Outcomes of an illness self-management group using wellness recovery action planning2010In: Psychiatric rehabilitation journal, ISSN 1095-158X, E-ISSN 1559-3126, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 57-60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of this preliminary study was to examine the impact of participation in an illness self-management recovery program (Wellness Recovery Action Planning - WRAP) on the ability of individuals with severe mental illnesses to achieve key recovery related outcomes. Methods: A total of 30 participants from three mental health centers were followed immediately before and after engaging in a 12-week WRAP program. Results: Three paired sample f-tests were conducted to determine the effectiveness of WRAP on hope, recovery orientation, and level of symptoms. A significant positive time effect was found for hope and recovery orientation. Participants showed improvement in symptoms, but the change was slightly below statistical significance. Conclusions: These preliminary results offer promising evidence that the use of WRAP has a positive effect on self-reported hope and recovery-related attitudes, thereby providing an effective complement to current mental health treatment.

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