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  • 1.
    Björklund, Martin
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research. Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy, Umea University, Umeå Sweden.
    Wiitavaara, Birgitta
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Heiden, Marina
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Responsiveness and minimal important change for the ProFitMap-neck questionnaire and the Neck Disability Index in women with neck-shoulder pain2017In: Quality of Life Research, ISSN 0962-9343, E-ISSN 1573-2649, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 161-170Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The aim was to determine the responsiveness and minimal important change (MIC) of the questionnaire ProFitMap-neck that measures symptoms and functional limitations in people with neck pain. The same measurement properties were determined for Neck Disability Index (NDI) for comparison purposes.

    Methods

    Longitudinal data were derived from two randomized controlled trials, including 103 and 120 women with non-specific neck pain, with questionnaire measurements performed before and after interventions. Sensitivity and specificity to discriminate between improved and non-improved participants, based on categorization of a global rating of change scale (GRCS), were determined for the ProFitMap-neck indices and NDI by using area under receiver operator curves (AUC). Correlations between the GRCS anchor and change scores of the questionnaires were also used to assess responsiveness. The change score that showed the highest combination of sensitivity and specificity was set for MIC.

    Results

    The ProFitMap-neck indices showed similar responsiveness as NDI with AUC exceeding 0.70 (Range: ProFitMap-neck, 0.74 – 0.83; NDI, 0.75 – 0.86). The MIC in the two samples ranged between 6.6 – 13.6% for ProFitMap-neck indices and 5.2 and 6.3% for NDI. Both questionnaires had significant correlations with GRCS (Spearman’s rho 0.47 – 0.72).

    Conclusions

    Validity of change scores was demonstrated for the ProFitMap-neck indices with adequate ability to discriminate between improved and non-improved participants. Values of minimal important change were presented.

  • 2.
    Boman, Eva
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Psychology.
    Ballgren, Peter
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Psychology.
    Svedberg, Pia
    Karolinska Inst, CNS, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Is health related quality of life among school children associated with level of semantic memory?2010In: Quality of Life Research, ISSN 0962-9343, E-ISSN 1573-2649, Vol. 19, p. 107-107, article id 194/1380Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Boman, Eva
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Psychology. Univ Gavle, Gavle, Sweden..
    Eriksson, Mårten
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Psychology. Univ Gavle, Gavle, Sweden..
    Svedberg, Pia
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Is perceived autonomy associated with health-related quality of life among adolescents?2016In: Quality of Life Research, ISSN 0962-9343, E-ISSN 1573-2649, Vol. 25, p. 85-85Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Boman, Eva
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Psychology.
    Svedberg, Pia
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Can psychosomatic symptoms explain gender and age differences in health related quality of life among Swedish schoolchildren?2012In: Quality of Life Research, ISSN 0962-9343, E-ISSN 1573-2649, Vol. 21, p. 77-78Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Hedov, Gerth
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Department of Caring Sciences and Sociology, Ämnesavdelningen för vårdvetenskap.
    Annerén, Göran
    Wikblad, Karin
    Self-perceived health in Swedish parents of children with Down's syndrome.2000In: Quality of Life Research, ISSN 0962-9343, E-ISSN 1573-2649, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 415-422Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this comparative study, self-perceived health was investigated in 165 parents of 86 children with Down's syndrome (DS), using the Swedish version of the SF-36 questionnaire. Questionnaires were mailed to parents of children with DS in a defined Swedish population. The results were compared with those in a randomised control group of parents from the Swedish SF-36 norm population. Mothers and fathers replied separately. Student's t-test with the Bonferroni correction was used for multiple statistical comparisons. The mothers of children with DS ('DS mothers') had significantly lower, less favourable scores than did the fathers of DS children ('DS fathers') in the Vitality (p < 0.0005) domain. Further, DS mothers spent significantly more time in caring for their child with DS than did the DS fathers (p < 0.0001). DS mothers also had lower scores than the mothers of the control group in the Vitality (p < 0.001) and Mental Health (p < 0.001) domains. DS fathers and control fathers differed significantly in the Mental Health domain (p < 0.002), but not otherwise. In conclusion, DS mothers showed poorer health than their spouses and the control mothers. No differences similar to those found between the DS mothers and DS fathers were observed between control mothers and control fathers.

  • 6.
    Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Engström, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Nursing Department, Medicine and Health College, Lishui University, Lishui, China.
    Nilsson, Annika
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Coping mediates the relationship between sense of coherence and mental quality of life in patients with chronic illness: a cross-sectional study2018In: Quality of Life Research, ISSN 0962-9343, E-ISSN 1573-2649, Vol. 27, no 7, p. 1855-1863Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The aim of the present study was to investigate relationships between sense of coherence, emotion-focused coping, problem-focused coping, coping efficiency, and mental quality of life (QoL) in patients with chronic illness. A model based on Lazarus’ and Folkman’s stress and coping theory tested the specific hypothesis: Sense of coherence has a direct and indirect effect on mental QoL mediated by emotion-focused coping, problem-focused coping, and coping efficiency in serial adjusted for age, gender, educational level, comorbidity, and economic status.

    Methods

    The study used a cross-sectional and correlational design. Patients (n = 292) with chronic diseases (chronic heart failure, end-stage renal disease, multiple sclerosis, stroke, and Parkinson) completed three questionnaires and provided background data. Data were collected in 2012, and a serial multiple mediator model was tested using PROCESS macro for SPSS.

    Results

    The test of the conceptual model confirmed the hypothesis. There was a significant direct and indirect effect of sense of coherence on mental QoL through the three mediators. The model explained 39% of the variance in mental QoL.

    Conclusions

    Self-perceived effective coping strategies are the most important mediating factors between sense of coherence and QoL in patients with chronic illness, which supports Lazarus’ and Folkman’s stress and coping theory.

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