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  • 1.
    Barnekow-Bergkvist, Margareta
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Hedberg, Gudrun
    University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Pettersson, Ulf
    Sports Medicine Unit, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, University of Umeå, Umeå, Sweden; Clinical Pharmacology, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, University of Umeå, Umeå, Sweden.
    Lorentzon, R.
    Sports Medicine Unit, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, University of Umeå, Umeå, Sweden.
    Relationships between physical activity and physical capacity in adolescent females and bone mass in adulthood2006In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 16, no 6, p. 447-455Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates whether physical activity and physical performance in adolescence are positively related to adult bone mineral density (BMD). In 1974, physical activity, endurance, and muscular strength were measured in 204 randomly selected female students, age 16.1 +/- 0.3 year (range 15-17 years). Twenty years later, 36 of the women volunteered to undergo a measurement of their BMD. Women who were members in a sports club in adolescence had significantly higher adult BMD (mean differences of 5% to 17% depending on site) compared with subjects who were not engaged in a sports club. Furthermore, women with persistent weight-bearing activity in adulthood had significantly higher BMD compared with women who had stopped being active or had never been active. The differences ranged between 5% and 19% with the highest difference found in trochanter BMD. Stepwise regression analyses showed that membership in a sports club at baseline was a significant independent predictor of BMD in the total body, lumbar spine, legs, trochanter, and femoral neck, explaining 17-26% of the variation in BMD. Change in body weight was a strong independent predictor of BMD of the total body and arms, explaining 8% of the variation in both sites. In addition, running performance at baseline was an independent predictor of total body BMD, whereas the two-hand lift performance significantly predicted BMD of the total body, legs and trochanter. The hanging leg-lift and handgrip were both significant predictors of arm BMD. In conclusion, membership in a sports club and site-specific physical performance in adolescence together with the change in body weight were significantly associated with adult BMD in premenopausal women

  • 2.
    Fahlström, Martin
    et al.
    Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Yeap, Joo Seng
    International Medical University, Jalan Rasah, Seremban, Negeri Sembilan, Malaysia.
    Alfredson, Håkan
    University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research. Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Söderman, Kerstin
    Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Shoulder pain - a common problem in world-class badminton players2006In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 168-173Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Badminton is a sport that requires a lot of over-shoulder motion, with the shoulder in abduction/external rotation. This questionnaire study on 188 international top-level badminton players during the World Mixed Team Championships showed that previous or present shoulder pain on the dominant side was reported by 52% of the players. Previous shoulder pain was reported by 37% of the players and on-going shoulder pain by 20% of the players. There were no significant differences in the prevalence of shoulder pain between men and women. The majority of the shoulder pain had started gradually. The pain was usually associated with shoulder activity, and stiffness was a common, associated symptom. Furthermore, the shoulder pain was associated with consequences such as sleeping disturbances, changes in training and competition habits, and it also affected activities of daily living. The majority of the players had sought medical advice and had been given different kinds of treatment. The study showed that shoulder pain is a common and significant problem in world-class badminton players, and the consequences are most likely of importance for their training and playing capacity.

  • 3. Westerståhl, M
    et al.
    Barnekow-Bergkvist, Margareta
    University of Gävle, Belastningsskadecentrum.
    Jansson, E
    Low physical activity among adolescents in practical education.2005In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 15, no 5, p. 287-297Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate physical activity levels and factors related to physical activity among 16-year old girls and boys in secondary school practical and theoretical programs. An additional aim was to identify factors contributing to differences in physical activity patterns between the educational programs. Sixteen-year old students in the first year of secondary school in Sweden (n = 585) were systematically selected and 93% agreed to complete a questionnaire. Compared with students in theoretical programs, those in practical programs spent less time and energy per day in physical activity. Girls in practical programs were the least physically active, and boys in theoretical programs the most physically active students. Statistical analysis showed that, among students in practical programs, the influence of educational program on physical activit y level was explained by lower socio-econornic level, less parental support, lower perceived health level, and negative attitudes towards outdoor physical activities. These data suggest that promotion of physical activity should focus on students, especially girls, in practical programs. Because the difference in physical activity levels between educational programs was partly an effect of less positive parental influence, school-based programs may be especially influential in increasing physical activity levels among secondary school students.

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