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  • 1. Lind, M.
    et al.
    Seipel, Stefan
    University of Gävle, Department of Mathematics, Natural and Computer Sciences, Ämnesavdelningen för datavetenskap.
    Mattiason, C.
    Displaying meta-information in context2001In: Behavior and Information Technology, ISSN 0144-929X, E-ISSN 1362-3001, Vol. 20, no 6, p. 427-432Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Very often information exists that would be helpful for process control operators if it could be presented in the context they work in-the process graphics. Examples are instructional material, visualizations of automated sequences, output from knowledge-based systems or simply annotations that one team of operators wants to communicate with another. Several existing distortion techniques were reviewed that would allow the ordinary process graphics to take less space leaving room for additional information. However, these techniques were rejected, mainly because all parts of a process control screen need to be readable at all times. A new technique is proposed and its readability experimentally evaluated with promising results.

  • 2.
    Seipel, Stefan
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Computer science. Centre of Image Analysis, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Evaluating 2D and 3D Geovisualizations for Basic Spatial Assessment2013In: Behavior and Information Technology, ISSN 0144-929X, E-ISSN 1362-3001, Vol. 32, no 8, p. 845-858Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the use of 2D and 3D presentations of maps for the assessment of distances in a geographicalcontext. Different types of 3D representations have been studied: A weak 3D visualisation that provides staticmonocular depth cues and a strong 3D visualisation that uses stereoscopic and kinetic depth cues. Two controlledexperiments were conducted to test hypotheses regarding subjects’ efficiency in visually identifying the shortestdistance among a set of market locations in a map. As a general result, we found that participants were able tocorrectly identify shortest distances when the difference to potential alternatives was sufficiently large, butperformance decreased systematically when this difference decreased. Noticeable differences emerged for theinvestigated visualisation conditions. Participants in this study were equally efficient when using a weak 3Drepresentation and a 2D representation. When the strong 3D visualisation was employed, they reported visualdiscomfort and tasks were solved significantly less correct. Presentations of intrinsic 2D content (maps) in 3Dcontext did, in this study, not benefit from cues provided by a strong 3D visualisation and are adequatelyimplemented using a weak 3D visualisation.

  • 3.
    Walldius, Åke
    et al.
    Centre for User Oriented IT Design, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sundblad, Yngve
    Centre for User Oriented IT Design, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bengtsson, Lars
    University of Gävle, Department of Technology and Built Environment, Ämnesavdelningen för industriell ekonomi. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Sandblad, Bengt
    Department of Human Computer Interaction, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Gulliksen, Jan
    Department of Human Computer Interaction, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    User certification of Workplace Software: Assessing both Artefact and Usage2009In: Behavior and Information Technology, ISSN 0144-929X, E-ISSN 1362-3001, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 101-120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article summarises activities and results from the quality assessment project 'Quality Assurance of IT Support at Work' (ITQ) which has been performed by Swedish researchers in close cooperation with trade unions 1999-2005. The ITQ project is part of a network, UsersAward, which works for the goal to develop and implement a strategy for good software products on the work floor. A main result of the ITQ project is the first version of a software certification programme, User Certified 2002, which is described in some detail. The underlying theoretical arguments for its design and the performed pilot projects which have informed its implementation are also presented. The outcome of performed certifications is discussed in terms of stakeholder response; in terms of whether to certify artefact, processes, or both; and in terms of the relationship between software certification, standardisation, and public procurement agreements. One conclusion from the project is that a viable software certification programme has to cover the software's built-in features, its deployment process, and its actual situated usage. A second conclusion is that the buying organisation has to implement integrative processes in which its organisational development and its implementation of IT systems are coordinated. Conclusions are also drawn with respect to the set of organisational patterns underlying the UsersAward initiative-certifications, user panels, user surveys, user conferences and a yearly IT Prize contest. Finally, implications and plans for the future, especially international research and union cooperation activities, and further development of the certification process are described.

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