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  • 1.
    Han, Song
    et al.
    Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för hållbar samhälls- och teknikutveckling.
    Dotzauer, Erik
    Mälardalens högskola, Framtidens energi.
    Thorin, Eva
    Mälardalens högskola, Framtidens energi.
    Yan, Jinyue
    Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för hållbar samhälls- och teknikutveckling.
    Techno-economic analysis of an integrated biorefinery system for poly-generation of power, heat, pellets and bioethanol2014Inngår i: International Journal of Energy Research, ISSN 0363-907X, E-ISSN 1099-114X, Vol. 38, nr 5, s. 551-563Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Bioethanol is an alternative to fossil fuels in the transportation sector. The use of pellet for heating is also an efficient way to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions. This paper evaluates the techno-economic performance of a biorefinery system in which an existing combined heat and power (CHP) plant is integrated with the production of bioethanol and pellet using straw as feedstock. A two-stage acid hydrolysis process is used for bioethanol production, and two different drying technologies are applied to dry hydrolysis solid residues. A sensitivity analysis is performed on critical parameters such as the bioethanol selling price and feedstock price. The bioethanol production cost is also calculated for two cases with either 10 year or 15 year payback times. The results show that the second case is currently a more feasible economic configuration and reduces production costs by 36.4%-77.3% compared to other types of poly-generation plants that are not integrated into existing CHP plants. 

  • 2.
    Johannes, Schmidt
    et al.
    Doctoral School Sustainable Development, University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Peter Jordan StraBe 82,.
    Leduc, Sylvain
    International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis, Schlossplatz 1, A-2361 Laxenburg, Austria.
    Dotzauer, Erik
    Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för hållbar samhälls- och teknikutveckling.
    Kindermann, Georg
    International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis, Schlossplatz 1, A-2361 Laxenburg, Austria.
    Schmid, Erwin
    Institute for Sustainable Economic Development, University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, FeistmantelstraBe 4,.
    Potential of biomass-fired combined heat and power plants considering the spatial distribution of biomass supply and heat demand2010Inngår i: International Journal of Energy Research, ISSN 0363-907X, E-ISSN 1099-114X, Vol. 34, nr 11, s. 970-985Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Combined heat and power (CHP) plants fired by forest wood can significantly contribute to attaining the target of increasingthe share of renewable energy production. However, the spatial distribution of biomass supply and of heat demand limits thepotentials of CHP production. This article assesses CHP potentials using a mixed integer programming model that optimizeslocations of bioenergy plants. Investment costs of district heating infrastructure are modeled as a function of heat demanddensities, which can differ substantially. Gasification of biomass in a combined cycle process is assumed as productiontechnology. Some model parameters have a broad range according to a literature review. Monte-Carlo simulations havetherefore been performed to account for model parameter uncertainty in our analysis. The model is applied to assess CHPpotentials in Austria. Optimal locations of plants are clustered around big cities in the east of the country. At current powerprices, biomass-based CHP production allows producing around 3% of the total energy demand in Austria. Yet, the heatutilization decreases when CHP production increases due to limited heat demand that is suitable for district heating.Production potentials are most sensitive to biomass costs and power prices.

  • 3.
    Klugman, Sofia
    et al.
    Högskolan i Gävle, Institutionen för teknik och byggd miljö, Ämnesavdelningen för energi- och maskinteknik.
    Karlsson, Magnus
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Division of Energy Systems, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Moshfegh, Bahram
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Division of Energy Systems, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Modeling an industrial energy system: Perspectives on regional heat cooperation2008Inngår i: International Journal of Energy Research, ISSN 0363-907X, E-ISSN 1099-114X, Vol. 32, nr 9, s. 793-807Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Through energy efficiency measures, it is possible to reduce heat surplus in the Pulp and paper industry. Yet pulp and paper mills situated in Countries with a heat demand for residential and commercial buildings for the major part of the year are potential heat Suppliers. However, striving to utilize the heat within the mills for efficient energy use Could conflict with the delivery of excess heat to a district heating system. As part of a project to optimize a regional energy system, a sulfate pulp mill situated in central Sweden is analyzed, focusing on providing heat and electricity to the mill and its surrounding energy systems. An energy system optimization method based on mixed integer linear programming is used for studying energy system measures on an aggregated level. An extended system, where the mill is integrated in a regional heat market (HM), is evaluated in parallel with the present system. The use of either hot sewage or a heat PUMP for heat deliveries is analyzed along with process integration measures. The benefits of adding a condensing unit to the back-pressure steam turbine are also investigated. The results show that the use of hot sewage or a heat pump for heat deliveries is beneficial only in combination with extended heat deliveries to an HM. Process integration measures are beneficial and even increase the benefit of selling more heat for district heating. Adding a condensing turbine unit is most beneficial in combination with extended heat deliveries and process integration. Copyright (c) 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • 4.
    Leduc, Sylvain
    et al.
    LTH; International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis, Schlossplatz 1, 2361 Laxenburg, Austria.
    Schwab, Dagmar
    University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Feistmantelstrasse 4, 1180 Vienna, Austria.
    Dotzauer, Erik
    Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för hållbar samhälls- och teknikutveckling.
    Schmid, Erwin
    University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Feistmantelstrasse 4, 1180 Vienna, Austria.
    Obersteiner, Michael
    University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Feistmantelstrasse 4, 1180 Vienna, Austria.
    Optimal location of wood gasification plants for methanol production with heat recovery2008Inngår i: International Journal of Energy Research, ISSN 0363-907X, E-ISSN 1099-114X, Vol. 32, nr 12, s. 1080-1091Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Second generation biofuels from wood gasification are thought to become competitive in the face of effective climate and energy security policies. Cost competitiveness crucially depends on the optimization of the entire supply chain-field-wheel involving optimal location, scaling and logistics. In this study, a linear mixed integer programming model has been developed to determine the optimal geographic locations and sizes of methanol plants and gas stations in Austria. Optimal locations and sizes are found by the minimization of costs with respect to biomass and methanol production and transport, investments for the production plants and the gas stations. Hence, the model covers competition in all levels of a biofuel production chain including supply of biomass, biofuel and heat, and demand for bio- and fossil fuels. The results show that Austria could be self-sufficient in the production of methanol for biofuels like M5, M10 or M20, using up to 8% of the arable land share. The plants are optimally located close to the potential supply of biomass (i.e. poplar) in Eastern Austria, and produce methanol around 0.4 is an element of(-1). Moreover, heat production could lower the methanol cost by 12%.

  • 5.
    Leduc, Sylvain
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Energivetenskap.
    Schwab,, Dagmar
    University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Vienna.
    Dotzauer, Erik
    Mälardalen University.
    Schmid, Erwin
    University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Vienna.
    Obersteiner, Michael
    International Institute for Applied System Analysis (IIASA), Laxenburg.
    Optimal location of wood gasification plants for methanol production with heat recovery2008Inngår i: International Journal of Energy Research, ISSN 0363-907X, E-ISSN 1099-114X, Vol. 32, nr 12, s. 1080-1091Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Second generation biofuels from wood gasification are thought to become competitive in the face of effective climate and energy security policies. Cost competitiveness crucially depends on the optimization of the entire supply chain-field-wheel involving optimal location, scaling and logistics. In this study, a linear mixed integer programming model has been developed to determine the optimal geographic locations and sizes of methanol plants and gas stations in Austria. Optimal locations and sizes are found by the minimization of costs with respect to biomass and methanol production and transport, investments for the production plants and the gas stations. Hence, the model covers competition in all levels of a biofuel production chain including supply of biomass, biofuel and heat, and demand for bio- and fossil fuels.The results show that Austria could be self-sufficient in the production of methanol for biofuels like M5, M10 or M20, using up to 8% of the arable land share. The plants are optimally located close to the potential supply of biomass (i.e. poplar) in Eastern Austria, and produce methanol around 0.4 is an element of(-1). Moreover, heat production could lower the methanol cost by 12%.

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