hig.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 2 of 2
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard-cite-them-right
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • sv-SE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • de-DE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Knudsen, Kati
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Ulrica
    Faculty of Medicine and Health, School of Health Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Högman, Marieann
    Centre for Research & Development, Uppsala University/Region Gävleborg, 801 88 Gävle, Sweden; Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden .
    Pöder, Ulrika
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Awake intubation creates feelings of being in a vulnerable situation but cared for in safe hands: a qualitative study2016In: BMC Anesthesiology, ISSN 1471-2253, E-ISSN 1471-2253, Vol. 16, no 1, article id 71Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Awake fiberoptic intubation is an alternative procedure for securing the airway and is a recommended option when a difficult airway is expected. The aim of the present study was to describe patient experiences with this procedure.

    Methods

    A qualitative, descriptive design was used and patients were recruited from three county hospitals and one university hospital in Sweden. Data was collected by semi-structured interviews with 13 patients who underwent awake fiberoptic intubation. A qualitative content analysis extracted theme, categories, and subcategories.

    Results

    From the patient statements, one main theme emerged, feelings of being in a vulnerable situation but cared for in safe hands, which were described in five categories with 15 subcategories. The categories were: a need for tailored information, distress and fear of the intubation, acceptance and trust of the staff’s competence, professional caring and support, and no hesitation about new awake intubation. The patients felt they lacked information about what to expect and relied on the professionals’ expertise. Some patients felt overwhelmed by the information they were given and wanted less specific information about the equipment used but more information about how they would be cared for in the operating room. Undergoing awake intubation was an acceptable experience for most patients, whereas others experienced it as being painful and terrifying because they felt they could not breathe or communicate during the procedure itself.

    Conclusions

    Tailored information about what to expect, ensuring eye contact and breathing instruction during the procedure seems to reduce patient distress when undergoing awake fiberoptic intubation. Most of the patients would not hesitate to undergo awake intubation again in the future if needed.

  • 2.
    Knudsen, Kati
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Pöder, Ulrika
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Högman, Marieann
    Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden, and Centre for Research & Development Uppsala University/ County Council of Gävleborg, Gavle, Sweden.
    Larsson, Anders
    Department of surgical sciences, Uppsala University, Anaesthesiology & ICM, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Ulrica
    School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    A nationwide postal questionnaire survey: The presence of airway guidelines in anaesthesia department in Sweden2014In: BMC Anesthesiology, ISSN 1471-2253, E-ISSN 1471-2253, Vol. 14, no 25, p. 25-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    In Sweden, airway guidelines aimed toward improving patient safety have been recommended by the Swedish Society of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care Medicine. Adherence to evidence-based airway guidelines is known to be generally poor in Sweden. The aim of this study was to determine whether airway guidelines are present in Swedish anaesthesia departments.

    Methods

    A nationwide postal questionnaire inquiring about the presence of airway guidelines was sent out to directors of Swedish anaesthesia departments (n = 74). The structured questionnaire was based on a review of the Swedish Society of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care voluntary recommendations of guidelines for airway management. Mean, standard deviation, minimum/maximum, percentage (%) and number of general anaesthesia performed per year as frequency (n), were used to describe, each hospital type (university, county, private). For comparison between hospitals type and available written airway guidelines were cross tabulation used and analysed using Pearson’s Chi-Square tests. A p- value of less than 0 .05 was judged significant.

    Results

    In total 68 directors who were responsible for the anaesthesia departments returned the questionnaire, which give a response rate of 92% (n 68 of 74). The presence of guidelines showing an airway algorithm was reported by 68% of the departments; 52% reported having a written patient information card in case of a difficult airway and guidelines for difficult airways, respectively; 43% reported the presence of guidelines for preoperative assessment; 31% had guidelines for Rapid Sequence Intubation; 26% reported criteria for performing an awake intubation; and 21% reported guidelines for awake fibre-optic intubation. A prescription for the registered nurse anaesthetist for performing tracheal intubation was reported by 24%. The most frequently pre-printed preoperative elements in the anaesthesia record form were dental status and head and neck mobility.

    Conclusions

    Despite recommendations from the national anaesthesia society, the presence of airway guidelines in Swedish anaesthesia departments is low. From the perspective of safety for both patients and the anaesthesia staff, airway management guidelines should be considered a higher priority.

1 - 2 of 2
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard-cite-them-right
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • sv-SE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • de-DE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf