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  • 1.
    Larsson, I. -M
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Wallin, E.
    Uppsala University, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science.
    Rubertsson, S.
    Uppsala University, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Health related quality of life improves during the first 6 month after cardiac arrest and hypothermia treatment2013In: Intensive Care Medicine, ISSN 0342-4642, E-ISSN 1432-1238, Vol. 39, no Suppl. 2, p. S221-S221Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION

    Patients’ quality of life (QoL) after having survived a cardiac arrest hasbeen reported negatively influenced or acceptable to good [1–3]. Feelings of anxiety anddepression are present in CA patients [3] and depressions have been shown to be related toQoL [4]. There is little known, however about changes over time in anxiety, depression and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) after surviving CA treated with therapeutic hypothermia (TH). Therefore, the aim of the study was to investigate if there were any changes and correlation in anxiety, depression and HRQoL from hospital discharge until one and 6 months after CA in patients treated with TH.

    OBJECTIVES

    During a 4-year period at three hospitals in Sweden, 26 patients were prospectively included after CA treated with TH.

    METHODS

    The patients answered the questionnaires Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), Euroqol (EQ5D), Euroqol visual analogue scale (EQ-VAS) and Short Form12 (SF12) at three occasions; in connection with hospital discharge, and at one and 6 months after CA.

    RESULTS

    There was improvement over time in HRQoL, in EQ5D index (p=0.002) and SF12 physical component score (PCS) (p=0.005). Changes over time in anxiety and depression were not found. Seventy-three percentages scored overall health status with EQ-VAS below 70 (scale 0–100) at discharge from hospital and at 6 months this was found in 41 %. Physical problems were most common cause of affected HRQoL. Correlation was found between depression and HRQoL and this was strongest at 6 months (rs=-0.44 to-0.71,pB0.001).

    CONCLUSIONS

    HRQoL are affected negatively in patients after CA treated with TH, but improvement over the first 6 months can be seen. The patients scored lower self-reported levels of HRQoL in physical than in mental components. The result indicates that time is an important factor and patients may require more support the first time after discharge from hospital.

    REFERENCE(S)

    1. Torgersen J, Strand K, Bjelland TW, et al. Cognitive dysfunction and health-related quality of life after a cardiac arrest and therapeutic hypothermia. Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2010;54:721–8. 2. Horsted TI, Rasmussen LS, Meyhoff CS and Nielsen SL. Long-term prognosis after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Resuscitation. 2007;72:214–8.3. Wachelder EM, Moulaert VR, van Heugten C, Verbunt JA, Bekkers SC and Wade DT. Life after survival: long-term daily functioning and quality of life after an out-of-hospitalcardiac arrest. Resuscitation. 2009;80:517–22. 4. Moulaert VR, Wachelder EM, Verbunt JA, Wade DT and van Heugten CM. Determinants of quality of life in survivors of cardiac arrest. J Rehabil Med. 2010;42:553–8.

  • 2.
    Larsson, I.-M.
    et al.
    Department of Surgical Sciences/Anesthesiology & Intensive Care, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Wallin, E.
    Department of Surgical Sciences/Anesthesiology & Intensive Care, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Sellert-Rydberg, M.
    Department of Anesthesiology & Intensive Care, Intensive Care Unit, Falun, Sweden.
    Rubertsson, S.
    Department of Surgical Sciences/Anesthesiology & Intensive Care, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science.
    Therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest: Relatives experiences during the first six weeks after cardiac arrest2011In: Intensive Care Medicine, ISSN 0342-4642, E-ISSN 1432-1238, Vol. 37, no Suppl. 1, p. S74-S74, article id 0274Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION

    The aim was to describe the relatives need for support and information during the acute phase when a next of kin has survived cardiac arrest treated with hypothermia at the intensive care unit (ICU). The aim was also to describe how everyday life is affected.

    OBJECTIVES

    Twenty relatives were interviewed at the time the person who had suffered acardiac arrest was discharged from hospital, 1.5–6 weeks after the cardiac arrest.

    METHODS

    The interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim and were analyzed with qualitative content analysis.

    RESULTS

    Support and information.The relatives emphasized the importance of support from the family but they could also feel loneliness in difficult moments. The staff’s presence in the ICU was supportive but how much of support the relatives experienced varied among the groups of relatives. Several of them experienced that the contact with other relatives and friends was a requirement and that all telephone calls to other relatives and friends took a lot of time and also that they could not cope with it. The relatives described that the information received at the ICU was adequate and correct. They felt, however, difficulties to assimilate the information because of difficulties in concentration and language confusion affecting the interpretation of the information. They appreciated the opportunity to ask questions but felt that the answers they sought for was not available. In comparison with ICU, the relatives experienced less information and contact with the staff in the medical ward. The relatives wished more written information and were missing information about prevention. Impact on daily life. The relatives experienced that every day life was affected through increased responsibility for the home. They also experienced that they had to support other relatives and had difficulty to take care of other relatives’ worries. The injured person’s disease resulted in a lot of practical things to take care of, like certificate, absence from work and travels to the hospital. They felt worry for the injured person and how the disease had affected them, mostly they were concerned about personality changes. They felt responsible for the injured person and were also concerned about how to cope with daily life after the person being discharged from the hospital. The relatives felt uncertainty about the future but hopeful. The interviews also revealed that many of the relatives had not discussed with the person stricken by the disease what really had happened.

    CONCLUSIONS

    The most important support when a next of kin had suffered a cardiac arrest was from other family members. The relatives wished repeated and more written information. Increased responsibility for the home and for the person stricken by the disease was the experience by the relatives on how everyday life was affected

  • 3.
    Wallin, E.
    et al.
    Department of Surgical Sciences/Anesthesiology & Intensive Care, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Larsson, I. M.
    Department of Surgical Sciences/Anesthesiology & Intensive Care, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Sellert-Rydberg, M.
    Department of Anesthesiology & Intensive Care, Intensive Care Unit, Falun, Sweden.
    Rubertsson, S.
    Department of Surgical Sciences/Anesthesiology & Intensive Care, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science.
    Support and impact on everyday life after survival from cardiac arrest: Relatives' descriptions 6 months after a significant other's cardiax arrest2011In: Intensive Care Medicine, ISSN 0342-4642, E-ISSN 1432-1238, Vol. 37, no Suppl. 1, p. S74-S74, article id 0276Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION

    The aim was to describe relatives’ need of support and information whena significant other has survived cardiac arrest and the impact on everyday life 6 months after theevent.OBJECTIVES.Interviews with 20 relatives were conducted 6 months after a significantother’s cardiac arrest.

    METHODS

    The interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim and were analyzed withqualitative content analysis.

    RESULTS

    The result illustrated various experiences by relatives. Six months after the sig-nificant other’s cardiac arrest relatives experienced support mainly from other family membersand friends. Relatives stated that the care, support and information in the intensive care unit hadbeen good but that they felt abandoned by the health care when the significant other wasdischarged from the intensive care unit. There were various requests to get more support fromthe health care mainly around issues concerning prognosis, rehabilitation and follow-up care.There were also requests to meet others in same situation, like family groups where they couldshare experiences. They experienced that the everyday life was affected especially withincreased responsibilities and requirements at home, restrictions in social life, a sense ofabandoned and a lack of understanding from the surroundings and a constant concern for thesignificant other.

    CONCLUSIONS

    Relatives’ everyday life was still affected 6 months after the event withincreased responsibilities at home and a constant concern for the person stricken by a cardiacarrest. The study illustrates that health care personnel need to offer relatives follow-upappointments to clarify issues concerning support and information.

  • 4.
    Wallin, E.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology & Intensive Care, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Larsson, I.-M.
    Uppsala University, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology & Intensive Care, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science.
    Rubertsson, S.
    Uppsala University, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology & Intensive Care, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Survivors after cardiac arrest and hypothermia treatment: Function and satisfaction in the first 6 months2013In: Intensive Care Medicine, ISSN 0342-4642, E-ISSN 1432-1238, Vol. 39, no Suppl. 2, p. S289-S289, article id 0270Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION

    The purpose of resuscitation and subsequent hypothermia treatment isto regain the health the patient had before the cardiac arrest. The effect can be classified indifferent ways: survival, time of survival and quality of life (QoL) (1). The life after cardiacarrest survival are affected and described as severe fatigue, feelings of anxiety and/ordepression, increased dependency in activity of daily life (ADL) and decreased QoL. (2)The aim of the study was to describe differences over time regarding functional outcome,physical and cognitive function of survivors after cardiac arrest treated with hypothermiaand also to examine survivors’ life satisfaction 6 months after cardiac arrest and genderdifferences.

    OBJECTIVES

    A prospective study including 40 cardiac arrest survivors admitted to threeSwedish hospitals between 2008 and 2012.

    METHODS

    Participants were studied from intensive care unit discharge to one and6 months after cardiac arrest. In addition to cerebral performance category (CPC), partic-ipants were asked to answer questionnaires regarding activities in daily life (Barthel Index),cognitive function (Mini Mental State Examination) and life satisfaction (LiSat-11).

    RESULTS

    At discharge from intensive care unit 9 (22.5 %) participants were defined withbad functional outcome (CPC 3–4). CPC improved over time and at 6 month all participantswere estimated with good functional outcome (CPC 1–2). At 1 month participants wereimpaired but they improved over time in their activities in daily life and cognitive function.Satisfaction with ‘‘life as a whole’’ was seen in 72.5 %.

    CONCLUSIONS

    Cardiac arrest survivors are satisfied with life as a whole despite a severeillness which has impaired their physical and cognitive function but seemed to improve overtime. To predict patients’ functional outcome in early stages is difficult and cerebral per-formance category alone is not sufficient to assess patients function. The healthcare teamneeds to work interdisciplinary and furthermore get a consensus of the instruments that bestcan reflect physical and cognitive function to specify the rehabilitation.

    REFERENCE(S)1: Cummins RO, Chamberlain D, Hazinski MF, Nadkarni V, Kloeck W,Kramer E, et al. Recommended guidelines for reviewing, reporting, and conducting researchon in-hospital resuscitation: the in-hospital ‘Utstein style’. American Heart Association.Circulation. 1997;95(8):2213–39. PubMed PMID: 9133537. 2. Moulaert VR, WachelderEM, Verbunt JA, Wade DT, van Heugten CM. Determinants of quality of life in survivors ofcardiac arrest. J Rehabil Med. 2010;42(6):553–8. PubMed PMID: 20549160.

1 - 4 of 4
CiteExportLink to result list
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  • apa
  • harvard-cite-them-right
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
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  • sv-SE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • de-DE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf