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  • 1.
    Bildtgård, Torbjörn
    et al.
    Social Work, Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Öberg, Peter
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Social work.
    Time as a structuring condition behind new intimate relationships in later life2015In: Ageing & Society, ISSN 0144-686X, E-ISSN 1469-1779, Vol. 35, no 7, p. 1505-1528Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although mobility in and out of intimate relationships has become more common in later life, it has been a neglected issue in social gerontology. In this article, we ask what characterises the formation of new intimate relationships in later life, and whether there are any specific conditions that separate these from relationships in earlier stages of the lifecourse. On the basis of qualitative interviews with 28 persons aged 63-91 who have established a new intimate heterosexual relationship after the age of 60 or who are dating singles, we argue that time constitutes such a central structuring condition. We discuss and theorise two aspects of time - post-(re)productive free time and remaining time - which have an important formative power on new late-in-life relationships. We argue that together these aspects form a central existential structure of ageing in many Western societies - the paradoxical condition of having lots of available free time but little time left in life - which, besides influencing new late-in-life relationships, might also be relevant to other aspects of and choices in later life. 

  • 2. Jelley, H.
    et al.
    Kerpershoek, L.
    Verhey, F.
    Wolfs, C.
    De Vugt, M.
    Bieber, A.
    Stephan, A.
    Meyer, G.
    Michelet, M.
    Norwegian National Advisory Unit on Ageing and Health, V.
    Selbaek, G.
    Sjölund, Britt-Marie
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Caring Science, Caring Science. School of Nursing and Human Sciences, Dublin City University, Dublin, Ireland.
    Sköldunger, A.
    Hopper, L.
    Irving, K.
    Marques, M.
    Balsinha, M. C.
    Gonçalves-Pereira, M.
    Portolani, D. M.
    Zanetti, O.
    Woods, B.
    Carers' experiences of timely access to and use of dementia care services in eight European countries2019In: Ageing & Society, ISSN 0144-686X, E-ISSN 1469-1779Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Timely access to care services is crucial to support people with dementia and their family carers to live well. Carers of people with dementia (N = 390), recruited from eight countries, completed semi-structured interviews about their experiences of either accessing or not using formal care services over a 12-month period in the Access to Timely Formal Care (Actifcare) study. Participant responses were summarised using content analysis, categorised into clusters and frequencies were calculated. Less than half of the participants (42.3%) reported service use. Of those using services, 72.8 per cent reported timely access and of those not using services 67.2 per cent were satisfied with this situation. However, substantial minorities either reported access at the wrong time (27.2%), or feeling dissatisfied or mixed feelings about not accessing services (32.8%). Reasons for not using services included use not necessary yet, the carer provided support or refusal. Reasons given for using services included changes in the condition of the person with dementia, the service's ability to meet individual needs, not coping or the opportunity to access services arose. Facilitators and barriers to service use included whether participants experienced supportive professionals, the speed of the process, whether the general practitioner was helpful, participant's own proactive attitude and the quality of information received. To achieve timely support, simplified pathways to use of formal care services are needed.

  • 3.
    Öberg, Peter
    Uppsala universitet, Sociologiska instutionen.
    The absent body: a social gerontolo­gical paradox1996In: Ageing & Society, ISSN 0144-686X, E-ISSN 1469-1779, Vol. 16, no 6, p. 701-719Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Öberg, Peter
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet.
    Tornstam, Lars
    Sociologiska institutionen, Uppsala universitet.
    Body images among men and women of different ages1999In: Ageing & Society, ISSN 0144-686X, E-ISSN 1469-1779, Vol. 19, no 5, p. 629-644Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The exterior territories, or surfaces, of the body have become symbols of the self in late modernity. People are increasingly overwhelmed with messages of youthful ideals: how to stay young or how to get old without signs of ageing. However, studies of the effects of these images on people’s own experiences as they grow older seem to be lacking. The present paper reports an empirical study which focuses on body image for men and women of different ages. Four hypotheses, derived from social gerontological theories, are developed and tested against data: the female beauty hypothesis, the double marginality hypothesis, the ageing mask hypothesis and the ageless self hypothesis. The survey, taken by 2,002 Swedes, reveals a response pattern with basically positive body images and, for women, increasingly positive with age. The results are, thus, in sharp contrast to the gerontophobic messages from consumer culture as well as to some gerontological theories

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