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  • 1.
    Andreassen Devik, S.
    et al.
    Centre of Care Research, Department of Health Sciences, Nord University, Steinkjer, Norway; Department of Health Sciences, Nord University, Namsos, Norway.
    Hellzén, Ove
    Department of Nursing Sciences, Mid-Sweden University, Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Enmarker, Ingela
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science. Centre of Care Research, Department of Health Sciences, Nord University, Steinkjer, Norway; Department of Nursing Sciences, Mid-Sweden University, Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Bereaved family members' perspectives on suffering among older rural cancer patients in palliative home nursing care: a qualitative study2017In: European Journal of Cancer Care, ISSN 0961-5423, E-ISSN 1365-2354, Vol. 26, no 6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Little is known about experiences with receiving home nursing care when old, living in a rural area, and suffering from end-stage cancer. The aim of this study was thus to investigate bereaved family members' perceptions of suffering by their older relatives when receiving palliative home nursing care. Qualitative semi-structured interviews were conducted with 10 family members, in Norway during autumn 2015, and directed content analysis guided by Katie Eriksson's theoretical framework on human suffering was performed upon the data. The two main categories identified reflected expressions of both suffering and well-being. Expressions of suffering were related to illness, to care and to life and supported the theory. Expressions of well-being were related to other people (e.g. familiar people and nurses), to home and to activity. The results indicate a need to review and possibly expand the perspective of what should motivate care. Nursing and palliative care that become purely disease and symptom-focused may end up with giving up and divert the attention to social and cultural factors that may contribute to well-being when cure is not the goal.

  • 2.
    Godskesen, Tove
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Centrum för forsknings- och bioetik.
    Kihlbom, Ulrik
    Uppsala universitet, Centrum för forsknings- och bioetik.
    Nordin, Karin
    Uppsala universitet; University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
    Silén, Marit
    Uppsala universitet, Vårdvetenskap.
    Nygren, Peter
    Uppsala universitet, Experimentell och klinisk onkologi.
    Differences in trial knowledge and motives for participation among cancer patients in phase 3 clinical trials2015In: European Journal of Cancer Care, ISSN 0961-5423, E-ISSN 1365-2354, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 516-523Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While participants in clinical oncology trials are essential for the advancement of cancer therapies, factors decisive for patient participation have been described but need further investigation, particularly in the case of phase 3 studies. The aim of this study was to investigate differences in trial knowledge and motives for participation in phase 3 clinical cancer trials in relation to gender, age, education levels and former trial experience. The results of a questionnaire returned from 88 of 96 patients (92%) were analysed using the Mann-Whitney U-test. There were small, barely relevant differences in trial knowledge among patients when stratified by gender, age or education. Participants with former trial experience were less aware about the right to withdraw. Male participants and those aged ≥65 years were significantly more motivated by a feeling of duty, or by the opinions of close ones. Men seem more motivated than women by external factors. With the awareness that elderly and single male participants might be a vulnerable group and participants with former trial experience are less likely to be sufficiently informed, the information consent process should focus more on these patients. We conclude that the informed consent process seems to work well, with good results within most subgroups.

  • 3.
    Mårtensson, Gunilla
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science.
    Carlsson, Marianne
    Uppsala universitet.
    Lampic, Claudia
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science.
    Are cancer patients whose problems are overestimated by nurses less satisfied with their care?2010In: European Journal of Cancer Care, ISSN 0961-5423, E-ISSN 1365-2354, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 382-392Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The main aim of the present study was to investigate whether patient-nurse dis/agreement concerning cancer patients' situation was of importance to patients' satisfaction with care. Another aim was to describe cancer patients' satisfaction with care and to investigate its relationship to cancer patients' emotional distress. A consecutive sample of individual patient-nurse pairs (n = 82) was recruited and followed during 3 days. Each pair consisted of a cancer patient newly admitted to an oncological/haematological ward and a nurse responsible for that patient's care. The known phenomenon of nurse overestimation of cancer patients' problems did not appear to be of importance to patients' satisfaction with care. However, patients whose depressive problems were underestimated by nurses were significantly less satisfied with the care they received. Furthermore, anxious and depressed patients were less satisfied with some aspects of the care they received than were the remaining patients. Although the patients' ratings and experiences of received care indicated a high degree of satisfaction, the patients also expressed negative experiences of care. To improve the quality of cancer care, nurses need to improve their ability to identify cancer patients' emotional distress if they are to satisfy patients' needs.

  • 4.
    Mårtensson, Gunilla
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Department of Caring Sciences and Sociology, Ämnesavdelningen för vårdvetenskap. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala.
    Carlsson, Marianne
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala.
    Lampic, Claudia
    University of Gävle, Department of Caring Sciences and Sociology, Ämnesavdelningen för vårdvetenskap. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala.
    Do nurses and cancer patients agree on individual patients' coping resources, emotional distress and quality of life?2008In: European Journal of Cancer Care, ISSN 0961-5423, E-ISSN 1365-2354, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 350-360Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study examines differences, associations and agreement in cancer patients' and their nurses' ratings of cancer patients' coping resources, emotional distress and quality of life. The study sample includes 90 individual patient-nurse pairs. The patient and nurse in each pair independently completed the Cancer Behaviour Inventory, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Spiritual Well-being. The results indicate a distinct pattern in which nurses overestimate patients' emotional distress and underestimate patients' coping resources and quality of life. A nurse who overestimated a patient's emotional distress and underestimated his/her resources for handling the situation was also likely to underestimate the patient's quality of life. Patient-nurse pairs who demonstrated consistent agreement differed from remaining pairs in that they had a larger percentage of nurses with advanced education and previous responsibility for their patients' care and in that they had higher frequencies of patients who had previously received care at the ward >5 days. Nurses caring for patients with cancer should be aware of the risk of making systematic misjudgements of patients' status. Increased attention to patients' internal resources may improve nurses' ability to make correct assessments and plan for individualized care.

  • 5.
    Senn, B.
    et al.
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Inselspital, University Hospital Berne, Berne, and Institute of Nursing Science, Faculty of Medicine, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.
    Kirsch, M.
    Department of Haematology, University Hospital Basel, Basel, and Institute of Nursing Science, Faculty of Medicine, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.
    Sanz, C. C.
    Department of Oncology-Haematology, University Hospital Germans Trias i Pujol, Badalona, and Department of Nursing, School of Health Sciences Tecnocampus Mataró-Maresme, Mataró, Spain.
    Karlou, C.
    Department of Nursing, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, and Oncology Department, General Air Force Hospital, Athens, Greece.
    Tulus, Kirsi
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science. Department of Nursing Science, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    De Leeuw, J.
    Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre,Nijmegen, the Netherlands.
    Ringner, A.
    Department of Nursing, Umeå University, Sweden.
    Goossens, G. A.
    Department of Surgical Oncology, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven, and Center for Health Services and Nursing Research, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
    Cleary, V.
    Catherine McAuley School of Nursing and Midwifery, Brookfield Health Sciences Complex, University College Cork, Cork, Eire.
    How cancer research could benefit from the Complex Intervention Framework: students' experiences of the European Academy of Nursing Science summer school2011In: European Journal of Cancer Care, ISSN 0961-5423, E-ISSN 1365-2354, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 1-4Article in journal (Refereed)
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