hig.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 4 of 4
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard-cite-them-right
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • sv-SE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • de-DE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Bergman, Karl-Olof
    et al.
    Linköping University.
    Burman, Joseph
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences; anterbury Christ Church UniversityCanterburyUK.
    Jonason, Dennis
    Linköping University.
    Larsson, Mattias C.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Ryrholm, Nils
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electrical Engineering, Mathematics and Science, Biology.
    Westerberg, Lars
    Linköping University.
    Milberg, Per
    Linköping University.
    Clear-cuts are temporary habitats, not matrix, for endangered grassland burnet moths (Zygaena spp.)2019In: Journal of Insect Conservation, ISSN 1366-638X, E-ISSN 1572-9753Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Burnet moths (Zygaena spp.) are day-flying Lepidoptera considered indicative of species-rich grasslands. In the present study, our aim was to clarify whether clear-cuts are habitat, supporting habitat or matrix for three species of Zygaena. We did so by sampling these species with sex pheromones on 48 clear-cuts, varying in amount of host and nectar plants, in southern Sweden. To compare the efficiency of such sampling, we also conducted transect walks on these clearcuts. Overall, host-plants on clear-cuts best explained the abundance of Zygaena spp. recorded, better than nectar-plants or connectivity with nearby grasslands. These results indicate that clear-cuts with an abundance of host plants are used as a fully functional habitat, and not a supporting habitat in the sense of only providing nectar. There is no support in these results for considering clear-cuts as an inert matrix. With about half the work-effort, pheromone traps recorded 100 times more Zygaena spp. as transect walks. The poor correspondence between observations during transects walks and pheromone trap catches suggest Zygaena spp. being difficult to monitor by transect walks. In contrast to grasslands, clear-cuts are short-term in nature requiring repeated recolonization, indicating the importance of permanent grasslands. However, clear-cuts are important temporary insect habitats due to their great acreage, and suitable management can increase the time they remain a habitat.

  • 2.
    Burman, Joseph
    et al.
    Department of Plant Protection Biology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Alnarp, Sweden; Ecology Research Group, Canterbury Christ Church University, Canterbury, Kent, United Kingdom .
    Westerberg, Lars
    IFM Biology, Conservation Ecology Group, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden .
    Ostrow, Suzanne
    IFM Biology, Conservation Ecology Group, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden .
    Ryrholm, Nils
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Biology.
    Bergman, Karl-Olof
    IFM Biology, Conservation Ecology Group, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden .
    Winde, Inis
    Department of Plant Protection Biology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Alnarp, Sweden; Department of Biology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden .
    Nyabuga, Franklin N.
    Department of Plant Protection Biology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Alnarp, Sweden; Department of Biology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden .
    Larsson, Mattias C.
    Department of Plant Protection Biology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Alnarp, Sweden.
    Milberg, Per
    IFM Biology, Conservation Ecology Group, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden .
    Revealing hidden species distribution with pheromones: the case of Synanthedonvespiformis (Lepidoptera: Sesiidae) in Sweden2016In: Journal of Insect Conservation, ISSN 1366-638X, E-ISSN 1572-9753, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 11-21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Synanthedonvespiformis L. (Lepidoptera: Sesiidae) is considered a rare insect in Sweden, discovered in 1860, with only a few observations recorded until a sex pheromone attractant became available recently. This study details a national survey conducted using pheromones as a sampling method for this species. Through pheromone trapping we captured 439 specimens in Southern Sweden at 77 sites, almost tripling the number of previously reported records for this species. The results suggest that S. vespiformis is truly a rare species with a genuinely scattered distribution, but can be locally abundant. Habitat analyses were conducted in order to test the relationship between habitat quality and the number of individuals caught. In Sweden, S. vespiformis is thought to be associated with oak hosts, but our attempts to predict its occurrence by the abundance of oaks yielded no significant relationships. We therefore suggest that sampling bias and limited knowledge on distribution may have led to the assumption that this species is primarily reliant on oaks in the northern part of its range, whereas it may in fact be polyphagous, similar to S. vespiformis found as an agricultural pest in Central and Southern Europe. We conclude that pheromones can massively enhance sampling potential for this and other rare lepidopteran species. Large-scale pheromone-based surveys provide a snapshot of true presences and absences across a considerable part of a species national distribution range, and thus for the first time provide a viable means of systematically assessing changes in distribution over time with high spatiotemporal resolution.

  • 3.
    Dennis, Roger L. H.
    et al.
    NERC Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Huntingdon, Cambridgeshire, UK; nstitute for Environment, Sustainability and Regeneration, Staffordshire University, Stoke on Trent, UK.
    Dapporto, Leonardo
    Istituto Comprensivo Materna Elementere Media Convenevole da Prato, Prato, Italy.
    Shreeve, Tim
    School of Life Sciences, Oxford Brookes University, Headington, Oxford, UK.
    John, Eddie
    Davies Cottage, Penllyn, Cowbridge, UK.
    Coutsis, John G.
    Athens, Greece.
    Kudrna, Otakar
    Naturmuseum Südtirol, Bozen, Italy.
    Saarinen, Kimmo
    South Karelia Allergy and Environment Institute, Tiuruniemi, Finland.
    Ryrholm, Nils
    University of Gävle, Department of Mathematics, Natural and Computer Sciences, Ämnesavdelningen för naturvetenskap.
    Williams, W. R. (Bob)
    Applied Psychology, Durham University, Queens Campus, Stockton on Tees, UK.
    Butterflies of European islands: the implications of the geography and ecology of rarity and endemicity for conservation2008In: Journal of Insect Conservation, ISSN 1366-638X, E-ISSN 1572-9753, Vol. 12, no 3-4, p. 205-236Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Depending on their faunal content islands can function as important ‘vehicles’ for conservation. In this study, we examine data on 440 butterfly species over 564 European islands in 10 island groups. To determine the status of the butterfly fauna, we have adopted two approaches, island-focused and species-focused, examined using principal components analysis and regression modelling.

    In the former, we relate species richness, rarity and endemicity to island geography (area, elevation, isolation and location in latitude and longitude); in the latter, species occurrence on islands is examined in relation to distribution, range, range boundaries, and altitudinal limits on the continent as well as species’ ecology (number of"/> host plants) and morphology (wing expanse). Species on islands are also assessed for their status on the continental mainland, their distributional dynamics (extinctions, distribution changes) and conservation status (Red Data Book, European Habitat Directive, Species of European Conservation Concern and Bern Convention listing.

    Unexpectedly, we find that a large fraction of the European butterfly species is found on the islands (63.4%; 59% on small islands) comprising some 6.2% of the land area of Europe. Although species occurring on the islands tend, on the whole, to have lower conservation status and are not declining over Europe, 45 species are endemics restricted to the islands. Species richness shows only a weak locational pattern and is related as expected to isolation from the continental source and island area; but, both rarity and endemicity have distinctive geographical bias to southern Europe, on islands now under increasing pressure from climate change and increasingly intensive human exploitation. The vulnerability of species on islands is emphasised in the relationship of island occurrence (% occurrence and presence/absence of species on any island) with continental distributions. A large proportion of the variation (84%) is accounted by continental distribution, the southern range limit and lower altitudinal limit. Most species (69%) occur on very few islands (\5%). In view of ongoing species dynamics on islands, migrations and extinctions of species, island repositories of species depend in large part on conservation of butterflies at continental sources. The unique faunas and rare species on islands also depend on appropriate concern being given to the island faunas. Conservation of European islands is thus a two-way process, sustaining sources and conserving island refuges. Residuals from the regressions (islands with more or fewer species, rare and endemic species; species occurring more or less frequently than expected on islands) provide warning signals of regions and islands deserving immediate attention.

  • 4. Maes, Dirk
    et al.
    Verovnik, Rudi
    Wiemers, Martin
    Brosens, Dimitri
    Beshkov, Stoyan
    Bonelli, Simona
    Buszko, Jaroslaw
    Cantú-Salazar, Lisette
    Cassar, Louis-Francis
    Collins, Sue
    Dincă, Vlad
    Djuric, Milan
    Dušej, Goran
    Elven, Hallvard
    Franeta, Filip
    Garcia-Pereira, Patricia
    Geryak, Yurii
    Goffart, Philippe
    Gór, Ádám
    Hiermann, Ulrich
    Höttinger, Helmut
    Huemer, Peter
    Jakšić, Predrag
    John, Eddie
    Kalivoda, Henrik
    Kati, Vassiliki
    Kirkland, Paul
    Komac, Benjamin
    Kőrösi, Ádám
    Kulak, Anatolij
    Kuussaari, Mikko
    L’Hoste, Lionel
    Lelo, Suvad
    Mestdagh, Xavier
    Micevski, Nikola
    Mihoci, Iva
    Mihut, Sergiu
    Monasterio-León, Yeray
    Morgun, Dmitry V.
    Munguira, Miguel L.
    Murray, Tomás
    Nielsen, Per Stadel
    Ólafsson, Erling
    Õunap, Erki
    Pamperis, Lazaros N.
    Pavlíčko, Alois
    Pettersson, Lars B.
    Popov, Serhiy
    Popović, Miloš
    Pöyry, Juha
    Prentice, Mike
    Reyserhove, Lien
    Ryrholm, Nils
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electrical Engineering, Mathematics and Science, Biology.
    Šašić, Martina
    Savenkov, Nikolay
    Settele, Josef
    Sielezniew, Marcin
    Sinev, Sergey
    Stefanescu, Constanti
    Švitra, Giedrius
    Tammaru, Toomas
    Tiitsaar, Anu
    Tzirkalli, Elli
    Tzortzakaki, Olga
    van Swaay, Chris A. M.
    Viborg, Arne Lykke
    Wynhoff, Irma
    Zografou, Konstantina
    Warren, Martin S.
    Integrating national Red Lists for prioritising conservation actions for European butterflies2019In: Journal of Insect Conservation, ISSN 1366-638X, E-ISSN 1572-9753, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 301-330Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Red Lists are very valuable tools in nature conservation at global, continental and (sub-) national scales. In an attempt to prioritise conservation actions for European butterflies, we compiled a database with species lists and Red Lists of all European countries, including the Macaronesian archipelagos (Azores, Madeira and Canary Islands). In total, we compiled national species lists for 42 countries and national Red Lists for 34 of these. The most species-rich countries in Europe are Italy, Russia and France with more than 250 species each. Endemic species are mainly found on the Macaronesian archipelagos and on the Mediterranean islands. By attributing numerical values proportionate to the threat statuses in the different national Red List categories, we calculated a mean Red List value for every country (cRLV) and a weighted Red List value for every species (wsRLV) using the square root of the country’s area as a weighting factor. Countries with the highest cRLV were industrialised (NW) European countries such as the Netherlands, Belgium, the Czech Republic and Denmark, whereas large Mediterranean countries such as Spain and Italy had the lowest cRLV. Species for which a Red List assessment was available in at least two European countries and with a relatively high wsRLV (≥ 50) are Colias myrmidone, Pseudochazara orestes, Tomares nogelii, Colias chrysotheme and Coenonympha oedippus. We compared these wsRLVs with the species statuses on the European Red List to identify possible mismatches. We discuss how this complementary method can help to prioritise butterfly conservation on the continental and/or the (sub-)national scale.

1 - 4 of 4
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard-cite-them-right
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • sv-SE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • de-DE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf