hig.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 10 of 10
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard-cite-them-right
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • sv-SE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • de-DE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Burström, Bo
    et al.
    Department of Public Health Sciences Equity and Health Policy Research Group Karolinska Institutet Stockholm Sweden;Centre for Epidemiology and Community Medicine Stockholm County Council Health Services Stockholm Sweden.
    Mellblom, Johanna
    Rinkeby Child Health Care Centre Stockholm County Council Health Services Stockholm Sweden.
    Marttila, Anneli
    Department of Public Health Sciences Equity and Health Policy Research Group Karolinska Institutet Stockholm Sweden.
    Kulane, Asli
    Department of Public Health Sciences Equity and Health Policy Research Group Karolinska Institutet Stockholm Sweden.
    Martin, Helena
    Stockholm County Council Child Health Services Stockholm Sweden.
    Lindberg, Lene
    Centre for Epidemiology and Community Medicine Stockholm County Council Health Services Stockholm Sweden;Department of Public Health Sciences Prevention, Intervention and Mechanisms in Public Health Research Group Karolinska Institutet Stockholm Sweden.
    Burström, Kristina
    Department of Public Health Sciences Equity and Health Policy Research Group Karolinska Institutet Stockholm Sweden;Department of Learning, Informatics, Medical Management and Ethics Stockholm Centre for Healthcare Ethics Health Outcomes and Economic Evaluation Research Group Karolinska Institutet Stockholm Sweden;Centre for Health Economics, Informatics and Healthcare Research Stockholm County Council Health Services Stockholm Sweden.
    Healthcare utilisation and measles, mumps and rubella vaccination rates among children with an extended postnatal home visiting programme in a disadvantaged area in Stockholm, Sweden - A 3‐year follow‐up2020In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 109, no 9, p. 1847-1853Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim

    To follow up healthcare utilisation and measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccination rates among children 0-36 months, receiving an extended postnatal home visiting programme in a disadvantaged area with poorer child health, and in control groups, in Stockholm, Sweden.

    Methods

    We analysed electronic child health records regarding outpatient visits, inpatient episodes and MMR vaccination for children 0-36 months receiving the home visiting programme (Intervention Group) and in control groups (Control Group and Rinkeby Comparison Group).

    Results

    Children in the Intervention Group had significantly higher MMR vaccination rate than children in the Rinkeby Comparison Group. Healthcare utilisation was similar in the Intervention Group and the control groups. In stratified analyses by number of home visits received, children receiving the recommended six home visits had significantly fewer inpatient episodes and somewhat fewer emergency visits than those receiving fewer home visits.ConclusionThe extended home visiting programme had a positive impact on the MMR vaccination rate. Children receiving the recommended six home visits had lower use of inpatient care. In addition to being positively perceived by parents in an area with greater healthcare needs, the programme may have a positive impact on their children's healthcare utilisation.

  • 2.
    Degerstedt, Frida
    et al.
    Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden; Umeå Center for Gender Studies, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Enberg, Birgit
    Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Keisu, Britt-Inger
    Umeå Center for Gender Studies, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Björklund, Martin
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research. Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Inequity in physiotherapeutic interventions for children with Cerebral Palsy in Sweden - a national registry study2020In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 109, no 4, p. 774-782Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: The aim of this study was to investigate the distribution of physiotherapeutic interventions for children with Cerebral Palsy in Sweden from an equity perspective, considering sex, country of birth and geographical region.

    METHOD: This national cross-sectional registry study includes children with Cerebral Palsy aged 0-18 years who participated in 2015 in the Swedish national quality registry, the Cerebral Palsy follow-up program, CPUP. Comparisons and associations between physiotherapeutic interventions and sex, country of birth and geographical regions were conducted using Chi2 and logistic regression analysis, controlling for cognitive level, level of motor function, age group and dominating symptom.

    RESULTS: Of the 2855 participants, 2201 (79%) had received physiotherapy. Children born in Sweden had 1.60 times higher odds (95% CI 1.10-2.33) of receiving physiotherapy compared with children born in foreign countries. Distribution of physiotherapeutic interventions differed significantly between geographical regions. No associations between sex and physiotherapeutic interventions were observed.

    CONCLUSION: The results of this study indicate inequity in care in Sweden towards children with Cerebral Palsy born in other counties. Further, physiotherapeutic interventions were not equally distributed in different.

  • 3.
    Hedov, Gerth
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Department of Caring Sciences and Sociology, Ämnesavdelningen för vårdvetenskap.
    Wikblad, Karin
    Annerén, Göran
    First information and support provided to parents of children with Down syndrome in Sweden: clinical goals and parental experiences.2002In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 91, no 12, p. 1344-1349Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When parents are informed that their newborn child has Down syndrome (DS), they often respond with a traumatic crisis reaction. The aims of this study were to assess the clinical goals regarding the first information and support provided to parents of newborn children with DS at the Swedish paediatric departments, and to analyse the parents' experiences of how they were first informed and treated. Data were collected during 1992-1993 from all of the 51 departments of paediatrics in Sweden. Information on the parents' experiences, collected retrospectively in 1996, was based on recollection by 165 parents of 86 children with DS born between 1989 and 1993 at 10 of the paediatric departments considered representative for Sweden. Seventy-five percent of the families were informed about the diagnosis within 24 h post partum. Some parents felt they were informed too late, and a few parents that they were told too soon. Half of the parents were satisfied with the timing. About 70% of the parents considered the information insufficient and 60% felt that they had been unsupported. Seventy percent would have liked more frequent information. Parental criticisms concerning the way in which the information was provided were that they received too much negative information about DS and that both the communication skills and the basic knowledge of DS on the part of the professionals could have been better. CONCLUSION: The Swedish paediatric departments fall short of their reported strong clinical goals regarding the initial information in Sweden, and improvements in this area are desirable.

  • 4.
    Nayeb, Laleh
    et al.
    Uppsala University.
    Lagerberg, Dagmar
    Uppsala University.
    Sarkadi, Anna
    Uppsala University.
    Salameh, Eva-Kristina
    Skåne University Hospital, Malmö.
    Eriksson, Mårten
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Psychology.
    Answer to the letter concerning our published paper about identifying language disorder in bilingual children2021In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 110, no 1, p. 362-363Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Reply by the current authors to the comments made by Daisy I. Perry & Gurdas V. Singh (see record 2020-99156-061) on the original article (see record 2020-99156-046). We read the commentary by Perry and Singhs with great interest and would like to take the opportunity to respond to their concerns, namely exclusion criteria; quality of parental information; control for SES; limited languages; varying expertise of professionals; and low sample size. The purpose of the screening was to identify new cases. Premature (<37 weeks) children and those with known disabilities were excluded as they are already in receipt of CHC services. Although we agree with Perry and Singhs that SES is associated with the prevalence of DLD, we cannot see that SES would affect the choice between the four screening models tested, negating the need for a control group. The issue of different professionals, with unclear or inadequate training, being involved is discussed. To this, we want to clarify that the screening method was already established and has been used for around two decades in the CHCs, albeit conducted solely in Swedish with 36-month-old children, rather than in multiple languages with 30-month-olds. Finally, we are in agreement with Perry and Singhs that the sample size was relatively small and the inclusion of more children would strengthen reliability. 

  • 5.
    Nayeb, Laleh
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet.
    Lagerberg, Dagmar
    Uppsala universitet .
    Sarkadi, Anna
    Uppsala universitet.
    Salameh, Eva-Kristina
    Speech and Language Clinic, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö.
    Eriksson, Mårten
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Psychology.
    Identifying language disorder in bilingual children aged 2.5 years requires screening in both languages2021In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 110, no 1, p. 265-272Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: Bilingual children are at risk of being overlooked for early identification of language difficulties. We investigated the accuracy of four screening models for children aged 2.5. The first model screened the child using their mother tongue, the second screened in Swedish, and the third screened in both languages used by the child. The fourth model consisted of direct screening in Swedish and using parental information about the child's language development in their mother tongue.

    METHODS: Overall, 111 bilingual children (51% girls), 29-33 months, were recruited from three child health centres in Gävle, Sweden, from November 2015 to June 2017. All children were consecutively assessed by a speech and language pathologist, blinded to the screening outcomes.

    RESULTS: Developmental language disorder was confirmed in 32 children (29%). Only the third model, based on direct assessment using the two languages used by the child, attained adequate accuracy; 88% sensitivity, 82% specificity, 67% positive and 94% negative predictive values.

    CONCLUSION: Bilingual children should be screened directly in both their languages in order to achieve adequate accuracy. Such screening procedure is particularly important for children from families with low socio-economic status living in complex linguistic environments.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 6.
    Nayeb, Laleh
    et al.
    Uppsala University.
    Lagerberg, Dagmar
    Uppsala University.
    Westerlund, Monica
    Uppsala University.
    Sarkadi, Anna
    Uppsala University.
    Lucas, Steven
    Uppsala University.
    Eriksson, Mårten
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Psychology.
    Modifying a language screening tool for three-year-old children identified severe language disorders six months earlier2019In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 108, no 9, p. 1642-1648Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: We examined if routine Swedish language screening for developmental language disorder (DLD) carried out at three years of age could be performed as effectively six months earlier. Methods: This study observed 105 monolingual Swedish-speaking children (53% boys) aged 29-31 months at three Swedish child health centres. We compared their ability to combine three words, as per the existing protocol, and two words. They also underwent a comprehension task. Speech and language pathologists clinically assessed the children for DLD and their results were compared with the nurse-led screening. Results: The results for the three-word and two-word criterion were the following: sensitivity (100% versus 91%) specificity (81% versus 91%), positive predictive (38% versus 56%) and negative predictive value (100% versus 99%). The three-word criterion identified 29 children with possible DLD, including 11 cases later confirmed, and the two-word criterion identified 18 possible cases, including 10 confirmed cases. DLD was overrepresented in the 10% of children who did not cooperate with the nurse-led screening. Conclusion: Changing the required word combinations from three to two words worked well. The three-word test identified one extra confirmed case, but resulted in 10 more false positives. Lack of cooperation during screening constituted an increased risk for DLD. 

  • 7.
    Sepp, Hanna
    et al.
    Department of Domestic Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Lennernäs, Maria
    Swedish Dairy Association AB, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Pettersson, Rickard
    Department of Information Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Abrahamsson, Lillemor
    Department of Domestic Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Children's nutrient intake at preschool and at home2001In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 90, no 5, p. 483-491Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A preschool-based dietary survey, using 7-d records, was carried out in a suburb of Stockholm. The aim was to assess the intake of food and the quality of the diet of preschool children aged 3-5 y at preschool and at home, and to compare the dietary intake with the Swedish dietary recommendations for preschool children. The respective mean intakes of protein, fat, carbohydrates and sucrose, expressed as a percentage of total energy intake were 14, 38, 50 and 9 at preschool, and at home 14, 36, 52 and 12 on weekdays, 14, 34, 55 and 16 on weekend days. The mean intakes of seven vitamins and minerals were low only for selenium as compared with the recommended level. No differences were found in nutrient density between diet at preschool and diet at home, with the exception of dietary fibre (higher at preschool). On weekdays there was a significantly higher nutrient density for calcium, zinc, selenium, vitamin A, riboflavin, vitamin C and dietary fibre compared with weekend days. Conclusion: The average intakes of energy and nutrients per meal at preschool compared with the recommended levels for children aged 4-6 y were low for all meals (breakfast, lunch and afternoon snack). This, however, was compensated for by home meals.

  • 8.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    et al.
    Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Division of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    Lampic, Claudia
    University of Gävle, Department of Caring Sciences and Sociology, Ämnesavdelningen för vårdvetenskap. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala Science Park, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Sunnerud, Sofia
    Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Division of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    Skoog Svanberg, Agneta
    Department of Women's and Children's Health, Academic Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Nurses promote openness regarding the genetic origins after gamete donation2007In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 96, no 10, p. 1500-1504Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To study attitudes and knowledge concerning different aspects of sperm and oocyte donation among paediatric nurses at child health care centres (CHCs) in Sweden. Method: A study-specific questionnaire, to be completed anonymously, was sent to 188 nurses, 141 of whom (75%) responded. Results: The majority of the respondents (62%) stated that they had no professional experience of families created with the help of a donor. A majority (53%) stated that they had good knowledge of the procedure followed in sperm donation, whereas 43% stated that they had good knowledge of the procedure of oocyte donation. More than 80% agreed that the parents should be honest with their child with regard to the child's genetic origin. Among the respondents who were in favour of disclosure, the preferred age for informing the child varied between 0 to 19 years (mean 7.2, SD 5.7). Conclusion: We conclude that the nurses working in CHCs need guidance and information about gamete donation in order to be able to support parents in the disclosure of information to their children and also how to inform or withhold information to significant others in their surrounding milieu.

  • 9. Westerlund, M.
    et al.
    Eriksson, Mårten
    University of Gävle, Department of Education and Psychology, Ämnesavdelningen för psykologi.
    Berglund, E.
    A short-term follow-up of children with poor word production at the age of 18 months2004In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 93, no 5, p. 702-706Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: (a) To study the stability of poor language development assessed by a new screening instrument based on parents' recognition of words their 18-mo-old children use; (b) to evaluate the predictability of the less-than-eight-words cut-off used by Child Health Centres (CHCs) in Sweden at the present 18-mo check-up--an assessment based on parents' recall of their children's vocabulary. Methods: All failures of the less-than-eight-words criterion, corresponding to about 10% of 1000 children from a community-based study, were followed up within half a year after the first assessment. The follow-up instrument was an extensive, internationally well-known and structured parent questionnaire, standardized for Swedish children. Results: Almost half of the followed-ups performed below the 10th percentile and more than two-thirds were found below the 20th percentile. Thus, after a few months about one-third of the children had caught up to a fairly normal level of performance. Two of the children who had recovered performed above median. More relaxed cut-off criteria were applied ad hoc , reducing the proportion of children with a fast recovery.

  • 10.
    Öborn, Helena
    et al.
    Division of Pediatrics, Department of Clinical Science, Technology and Intervention, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wettergren, Lena
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Nursing, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Herthelius, Maria
    Division of Pediatrics, Department of Clinical Science, Technology and Intervention, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Forinder, Ulla
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Social work. Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Social Work, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Associations between lower urinary tract dysfunction and health-related quality of life in children with chronic kidney disease2016In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 105, no 8, p. 959-966Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim Little is known about the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of children with lower urinary tract dysfunction (LUTD) and chronic kidney disease (CKD). We investigated LUTD and other possible predictors of impaired HRQoL in children with conservatively treated moderate to severe CKD or with a kidney transplant.

    Methods All 64 children with CKD or a kidney transplant treated at Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden, between June 2011 and December 2012 were approached and 59 children aged 8-18 were enrolled in the study. Lower urinary tract function was evaluated with voiding history, frequency and volume chart, uroflowmetry and post void ultrasound measurements. Self-reported HRQoL was assessed with validated generic instruments.

    Results The HRQoL of the study cohort was as good as the general paediatric population, apart from the physical and psychological well-being dimensions, and was no different to children with other chronic conditions. Urinary incontinence, but not LUTD in general, was associated with impaired HRQoL, as was having a kidney transplant and being female in some dimensions.

    Conclusion LUTD was common in children with CKD or a kidney transplant but did not affect their general HRQoL. Predictors of impaired HRQoL included incontinence, having had a kidney transplant and being female.

1 - 10 of 10
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard-cite-them-right
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • sv-SE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • de-DE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf