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  • 1.
    Abdelrazek, Fathya
    et al.
    Faculty of Nursing, Suez Canal University, Port-Said, Egypt.
    Skytt, Bernice
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Aly, Magda
    Faculty of Nursing, Suez Canal University, Port-Said, Egypt.
    El-Sabour, Mona Abd
    Faculty of Nursing, Suez Canal University, Port-Said, Egypt.
    Ibrahim, Naglaa
    Faculty of Nursing, Suez Canal University, Port-Said, Egypt.
    Engström, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Leadership and management skills of first-line managers of elderly care and their work environment2010In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 18, no 6, p. 736-745Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim To study the leadership and management skills of first-line managers (FLMs) of elderly care and their work environment in Egypt and Sweden. Background FLMs in Egypt and Sweden are directly responsible for staff and quality of care. However, FLMs in Sweden, in elderly care, have smaller units/organizations to manage than do their colleagues in Egypt. Furthermore, family care of the elderly has been the norm in Egypt, but in recent years institutional care has increased, whereas in Sweden, residential living homes have existed for a longer period. Methods A convenience sample of FLMs, 49 from Egypt and 49 from Sweden, answered a questionnaire measuring leadership and management skills, structural and psychological empowerment, job satisfaction and psychosomatic health. Results In both countries, FLMs' perceptions of their leadership and management skills and psychological empowerment were quite high, whereas scores for job satisfaction and psychosomatic health were lower. FLMs had higher values in several factors/study variables in Egypt compared with in Sweden. Conclusion and implications The work environment, both in Egypt and Sweden, needs to be improved to increase FLMs' job satisfaction and decrease stress. The cultural differences and levels of management have an effect on the differences between the two countries.

  • 2.
    Ahlin, Catharina
    et al.
    karolinska institutet, Stockholm.
    Löfmark, Anna
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science.
    Klang, Birgitta
    Karolinska institutet, Stockholm.
    Johansson, Eva
    Karolinska institutet, Stockholm.
    Development of instruments for assessment of nursing students’ knowledge and skills in performing venepuncture and inserting peripheral venous catheters2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Ahlin, Catharina
    et al.
    Karolinska institutet.
    Löfmark, Anna
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science.
    Klang Söderkvist, Birgitta
    Karolinska instituet.
    Johansson, Eva
    Karolinska Instituet.
    Development of instruments for assessment of knowledge and skills in performing venepuncture and inserting peripheral venous catheters2013In: Journal of Vascular Access, ISSN 1129-7298, E-ISSN 1724-6032, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 364-372Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Performing venepuncture is one of the most routinely performed invasive procedures in nursing care. The aim of this study was to develop instruments for the assessment of nursing students' knowledge and skills when performing venepuncture and inserting a peripheral venous catheter. 
Methods: Two instruments were developed using the following steps. 1) Assessment items of importance for the procedures (venepuncture 48 items and peripheral venous catheter 51 items) were collected from focus groups including nurses, lecturers and patients. 2) The number of items was reduced using a method based on the Delphi method. Experts (n=51) reviewed the instruments in two rounds. The revised versions included 31 items for venepuncture and 33 items for peripheral venous catheter insertion. 3) Usability tests were conducted by nurses who tested the instruments to confirm that items were possible to assess. 4) Inter-rater reliability was assessed by twelve lecturers who in pairs, but independently of each other, used the instruments to assess 50 nursing students. 
Results: Proportion of agreement and Cohen's kappa coefficient were calculated for each item to determine inter-rater reliability. Among the tested items for both instruments, the median proportion of agreement was 1 (range 0.66-1) and the median kappa was 0.52 (range 0.22-1). 
Conclusions: The instruments developed for assessing nursing students' knowledge and skills of venepuncture and peripheral venous catheter insertion showed satisfactory inter-rater reliability.

  • 4.
    Andersson, Inger
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science.
    Hofsten, Anna
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Medical science.
    Häggström, Elisabeth
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science.
    Case seminars open new doors to understanding – students’ experiences of learning2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Arenhall, Eva
    et al.
    Örebro universitet.
    Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science.
    Sexualitet och parrelation vid hjärtsjukdom2012In: Kardiologisk omvårdnad / [ed] Bengt Fridlund, Dan Malm, Jan Mårtensson, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2012, 2, p. 403-416Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Arenhall, Eva
    et al.
    Örebro University Hospital, Department of Cardiology.
    Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Section of Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University; Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Malm, Dan
    School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University; County Hospital Ryhov, Jönkoping, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Ulrica
    Department of Anesthesia and Intensive Care, Örebro University.
    The male partners' experiences of the intimate relationships after a first myocardial infarction2011In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 108-114Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Stress in the intimate relationship is found to worsen the prognosis in women suffering from myocardial infarction (MI). Little is known about how male spouses experience the intimate relationship.

    Aim: This study aimed to explore and describe the experience of men’s intimate relationships in connection to and after their female partner’s first MI.

    Methods: An explorative and qualitative design was used. Interviews were conducted with 16 men having a partner who the year before had suffered a first MI. The data were analysed with qualitative content analysis.

    Results: Three themes emerged: masculine image challenged; life takes another direction; and life remains unchanged. The men were forced to deal with an altered image of themselves as men, and as sexual beings. They were hesitant to approach their spouse in the same way as before the MI because they viewed her to be more fragile. The event also caused them to consider their own lifestyle, changing towards healthier dietary and exercise habits.

    Conclusions: After their spouse’s MI, men experienced a challenge to their masculine image. They viewed their spouse as being more fragile, which led the men to be gentler in sexual intimacy and more hesitant to invite sexual activity. This knowledge about how male spouses experience the intimate relationship could be helpful for health personnel in hospitals and primary care when they interact with couples where the woman suffers from cardiac disease or other chronic disorders.

  • 7.
    Arenhall, Eva
    et al.
    Örebro universitet.
    Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Section of Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Hälsohögskolan Jönköping.
    Nilsson, Ulrica
    Örebro universitet.
    The female partners' experiences of intimate relationship after a first myocardial infarction2011In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 20, no 11-12, p. 1677-1684Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim.

    This study aimed to explore and describe women’s experience of intimate relationships in connection to and after their partner’s first myocardial infarction.

     

    Background.

    Support from partners is important for recovery, but little is known about partners’ experience of intimate relationships after myocardial infarction.

     

    Design.

    The study used an explorative, qualitative design.

     

    Methods.

    The first author interviewed 20 women having a partner who had suffered a first myocardial infarction during the preceding year. Qualitative content analysis was used to analyse the data.

     

    Findings.

    Three themes emerged: ‘limited life space’, ‘sense of life lost’ and ‘another dimension of life’. The women described how their self-assumed responsibility led to a more stifling and limited life. Their sense of life lost was described in terms of deficits and feeling the loss. The women also described experiencing another dimension of life characterised by three subthemes: ‘uncertainty of life’, ‘certain of relationship’ and ‘share life more’.

     

    Conclusions.

    The partners’ myocardial infarction had an impact on the interviewees’ intimate relationships; they suffered a major loss and missed their ‘former’ partner, both emotionally and sexually. They struggled with the new asymmetry in their intimate relationship and felt compelled to adapt to their partners’ lack of sexual desire or function. Also, their partner controlled them, which lead towards a stifling, more limited life space.

     

    Relevance to clinical practice.

    Caregivers in hospital and primary care settings could apply the findings in their efforts to help couples recover or maintain intimate relationships following myocardial infarction.

  • 8.
    Blom Johansson, Monica
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Carlsson, Marianne
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science.
    Östberg, Per
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Sonnander, Karin
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    A multiple-case study of a family-oriented intervention practice in the early rehabilitation phase of persons with aphasia2013In: Aphasiology, ISSN 0268-7038, E-ISSN 1464-5041, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 201-226Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Having a family member with aphasia severely affects the everyday life of the significant others, resulting in their need for support and information. Family-oriented intervention programmes typically consist of support, information, and skill training, such as communication partner training (CPT). However, because of time constraints and perceived lack of skills and routines, such programmes, especially CPT, are not common practice among speech-language pathologists (SLPs).

    Aims: To design and evaluate an early family-oriented intervention of persons with stroke-induced moderate to severe aphasia and their significant others in dyads. The intervention was designed to be flexible to meet the needs of each participant, to emotionally support the significant others and supply them with information needed, to include CPT that is easy to learn and conduct for SLPs, and to be able to provide CPT when the persons with aphasia still have access to SLP services.

    Methods & Procedures: An evaluative multiple-case study, involving three dyads, was conducted no more than 2 months after the onset of aphasia. The intervention consisted of six sessions: three sessions directed to the significant other (primarily support and information) and three to the dyad (primarily CPT). The intervention was evaluated both qualitatively and quantitatively based on video recordings of conversations and self-assessment questionnaires.

    Outcomes & Results: The importance of emotional support as well as information about stroke/aphasia was clearly acknowledged, especially by the significant others. All significant others perceived increased knowledge and understanding of aphasia and related issues.

    Communicative skills (as manifested in the video recordings) showed improvements from pre- to post-intervention.

    Conclusions: The results corroborate the need for individualised and flexible family-oriented SLP services that are broad in content. Furthermore, the results support the early initiation of such services with recurrent contact. The usefulness of CPT this early in the rehabilitation process was indicated but is yet to be proved.

  • 9.
    Blom Johansson, Monica
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Carlsson, Marianne
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science.
    Östberg, Per
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Sonnander, Karin
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Communication changes and SLP services according to significant others of persons with aphasia2012In: Aphasiology, ISSN 0268-7038, E-ISSN 1464-5041, Vol. 26, no 8, p. 1005-1028Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Significant others are important to persons with aphasia. For several reasons they should be involved in speech-language pathology (SLP) services, including acquiring facilitating communicative strategies and receiving support. In order to further adapt SLP services there is a need to know the perceptions and views of the significant others. Little is known about how they perceive changes in communication as well as received SLP services and in what way they want to be involved in these services.

    Aims: The study aimed to investigate which communicative changes significant others of persons with aphasia had experienced after a stroke event and to what extent these changes were experienced. A further aim was to describe the significant others' experiences of SLP services and their motivation to participate in these services. Finally, the significant others' experiences were compared in terms of sex, age, type of relationship, time since stroke onset, and type and severity of aphasia.

    Methods & Procedures: An 80-item study-specific questionnaire was answered by 173 significant others of persons with aphasia living throughout Sweden (response rate 69%). Of these, 33% were male and 67% female. Mean age was 64.2 years (range 33–87 years) and 85.5% of the participants were a cohabiting partner to a person with aphasia.

    Outcomes & Results: A total of 64% of participants perceived their conversations as being less stimulating and enjoyable compared with conversations before stroke onset. Aphasia was considered a substantial or very substantial problem by 64%. The participants took on an increased communicative responsibility, and 70% had changed their communicative behaviour in order to facilitate conversations. A total of 75% (n = 130) had met with the SLP of the person with aphasia. Of those, 63% perceived their own support from SLP services to be adequate; 87% considered language ability training as the most important SLP service. Type and severity of aphasia were especially related to the communicative experiences of the participants and their motivation to be involved in SLP services.

    Conclusions: The substantial decrease from pre- to post-stroke regarding enjoyment and meaningfulness of conversations suggests the need to further improve SLP services in order to help the people in question communicate at an optimal level. We suggest that clinicians should put more emphasis on explaining the benefits and availability of different kinds of aphasia rehabilitation services, such as functional communication training and communication partner training in addition to language ability training.

  • 10.
    Borg, Tomas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Carlsson, Marianne
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science.
    Larsson, Sune
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Questionnaire to assess treatment outcomes of acetabular fractures2012In: Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery, ISSN 1022-5536, E-ISSN 2309-4990, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 55-60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: To construct a questionnaire to assess outcomes in patients who underwent internal fixation for acetabular fractures.

    METHODS: 27 female and 100 male consecutive patients (mean age, 50 years) who underwent internal fixation for acetabular fractures were included. Patients were asked to report their outcomes at months 6, 12, and 24 using a questionnaire. The initial questionnaire was constructed by an expert group. There were 11 closed questions, each came with 6 responses from ?no discomfort? to ?very severe discomfort?. Three open questions were added to cover topics that were not included. The content validity and relevance of the 11 closed questions was determined using factor analysis to determine the number of factors involved. Factorability of the correlation matrix was measured via the Bartlett test of sphericity and Kaiser-Meyer- Olkin (KMO) measure of sampling sufficiency. Factor loadings of <0.50 were considered acceptable for factor representation. Reliability in terms of internal consistency was expressed as Cronbach alpha coefficients. The responses to the 3 open questions were analysed and categorised by a single assessor.

    RESULTS: 120 (94%) of the patients completed at least one questionnaire, and 92 (72%) completed all 3 questionnaires during the follow-up period. Based on responses to the 6-month questionnaire, responses to the 11 closed questions were significantly intercorrelated (Spearman 0.17-0.80). After factor analysis and analysis of responses to open questions, the number of questions was reduced to 6 and included questions related to pain, walking, hip motion, leg numbness, sexual life, and operation scar. Reliability of the questionnaire was estimated to alpha=0.89. Criterion validity was adequate with a high correlation with the Short Form 36 (r=0.56-0.80).

    CONCLUSION: Patients treated with acetabular fractures can be adequately assessed using the 6-item questionnaire and one global question concerning impact on activities of daily living.

  • 11.
    Brännström, Margareta
    et al.
    Strategic Research Program in Health Care Sciences (SFO-V), Karolinska Institutet, and Department of Nursing, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Ivarsson, Bodil
    Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Lund University and Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Ulrica
    School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Svedberg, Petra
    School of Social and Health Sciences, Halmstad University, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Thylén, Ingela
    Division of Nursing Sciences, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, and Department of Cardiology UHL, County Council of Östergötland, Linköping, Sweden.
    Sexual knowledge in patients with a myocardial infarction and their partners2014In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-4655, E-ISSN 1550-5049, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 332-339Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Sexual health and sexual activity are important elements of an individual’s well-being. For couples, this topic is often affected after a myocardial infarction (MI). It has become increasingly clear that, after an MI, patients are insufficiently educated on how to resume normal sexual activity. However, sufficient data on the general knowledge that patients and partners have about sexual activity and MI are lacking.

    Objective: The aims of this study were to explore and compare patients’ and partners’ sexual knowledge 1 month after a first MI and 1 year after the event and to compare whether the individual knowledge had changed over time. A second aim was to investigate whether patients and their partners report receiving information about sexual health and sexual activity from healthcare professionals during the first year after the event and how this information was perceived.

    Subjects and Methods: This descriptive, comparative survey study enrolled participants from 13 Swedish hospitals in 2007-2009. A total of 115 patients with a first MI and their partners answered the Sex After MI Knowledge Test questionnaire 1 month after the MI and 1 year after the event. Correct responses generated a maximum score of 75.

    Results: Only 41% of patients and 31% of partners stated that they had received information on sex and relationships at the 1 year follow-up. The patients scored 51±10 on the Sex After MI Knowledge Test at inclusion into the study, compared with the 52±10 score for the partners. At the 1-year follow-up, the patients’ knowledge had significantly increased to a score of 55±7, but the partners’ knowledge did not significantly change (53±10).

    Conclusions: First MI patients and their partners reported receiving limited information about sexual issues during the cardiac rehabilitation and had limited knowledge about sexual health and sexual activity.

  • 12.
    Bååth, Carina
    et al.
    Karlstad Universitet.
    Mårtensson, Gunilla
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science.
    Mamhidir, Anna Greta
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science.
    Florin, Jan
    Högskolan i Dalarna.
    Muntlin-Athlin, Åsa
    Uppsala Universitet.
    Gunningberg, Lena
    Uppsala Universitet.
    Pressure ulcer prevention – is nursing knowledge appropriate or not?: A descriptive multi-center study in Sweden2013In: Proceedings of the 16th Annual European Pressure Ulcer Meeting, Vienna Austria, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Candell, Agneta
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science.
    Engström, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science.
    Dental hygienists' work environment: motivating, facilitating, but also trying2010Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 14.
    Candell, Agneta
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science.
    Engström, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science. Uppsala universitet.
    Dental hygienists’ work environment: motivating, facilitating, but also trying2010In: International Journal of Dental Hygiene, ISSN 1601-5029, E-ISSN 1601-5037, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 204-212Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study was to describe dental hygienists' experiences of their physical and psychosocial work environment. The study was descriptive in design and used a qualitative approach. Eleven dental hygienists participated in the study and data were collected during spring 2008 using semi-structured interviews. The material was analysed using qualitative content analysis. The results showed that the dental hygienists experienced their work environment as motivating and facilitating, but at the same time as trying. The three categories revealed a theme: Being controlled in a modern environment characterized by good relationships. Motivating factors were the good relationship with co-workers, managers and patients, seeing the results of your work, having your own responsibility and making your own decisions. The new, pleasant and modern clinics, good cooperation between co-workers and varying duties were described as facilitating factors. The trying factors, as described by the dental hygienists, were above all being controlled by time limits or by some elements of the work, such as teamwork. The dental hygienists also felt stress because appointments were too-short. To conclude, the participants described their work environment as trying in several ways, despite the modern clinics and good relationships.

  • 15.
    Dahlkvist, Eva
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science. Department of Health and Medicine, Örebro University.
    Nilsson, Annika
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University.
    Skovdahl, Kirsti
    Örebro Universitet, Institutionen för Hälsovetenskap och medicin.
    Engström, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University.
    Is there a caring perspective in garden/patio design in elderly care?: a description and a comparison of residents' and staff members' perceptions of these outdoor spaces2014In: Journal of Housing for the Elderly, ISSN 0276-3893, E-ISSN 1540-353X, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 85-106Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article aimed to describe characteristics of and design elements in gardens/patios at 87 residential living homes for older people and to describe and compare residents’ and staff members’ perceptions of these spaces. The result showed that many gardens/patios had several recommended design elements and at the same time obvious deficiencies. The residents (n=415) valued various aspects of the garden/patio more highly than the staff did (n=667). One conclusion is that managers responsible for residential living homes for older people should pay attention to and takes measures to ameliorate shortcomings and deficient elements in design and accessibility so that the garden/patio can be used as an important health promotion resource in the care of older people. Residents and staff can be seen as very important actors in such development work.

     

  • 16.
    Engström, Maria
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science.
    Skytt, Bernice
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science.
    Ernesäter, Annica
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science.
    Fläckman, Birgitta
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science.
    Mamhidir, Anna-Greta
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science.
    District nurses' self-reported clinical activities, beliefs about and attitudes towards obesity management2013In: Applied Nursing Research, ISSN 0897-1897, E-ISSN 1532-8201, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 198-203Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM:

    To describe district nurses' self-reported clinical activities, beliefs about and attitudes towards obesity management; and to examine associations between the variables.

    BACKGROUND:

    Obesity is increasing worldwide and primary care could play a central role in the management.

    METHODS:

    Questionnaire data were collected from 247 nurses in 33 centres.

    RESULTS:

    The most common activities performed weekly were; advice about physical activity (40.1%) and general lifestyle advice (34.8%). However, nearly one third seldom/never performed these activities. Approximately half seldom/never performed BMI assessment and even fewer waist circumference (78.1%). Values for the factors Importance of obesity and Personal effectiveness were skewed towards a positive view and Negative view close to neutral. Multivariate analysis revealed that nurses with specialized tasks, longer working experience and higher perceived personal effectiveness performed more clinical activities.

    CONCLUSION:

    Managers need to make efforts to engage all personnel in obesity management; and strategies to increase self-efficacy are called for.

  • 17.
    Engström, Maria
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden .
    Skytt, Bernice
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden .
    Nilsson, Annika
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden .
    Working life and stress symptoms among caregivers in elderly care with formal and no formal competence2011In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 19, no 6, p. 732-741Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Working life and stress symptoms among caregivers in elderly care with formal and no formal competence Aim  The aim of the present study was to describe and compare caregivers with formal and no formal competence on job satisfaction, psychosomatic health, structural and psychological empowerment and perceptions of care quality. A further aim was to study relationships among study variables. Methods  A convenience sample of 572 caregivers in elderly care participated. Results  Caregivers with no formal competence perceived higher workload, more communication obstacles, less competence, poorer sleep and more stress symptoms than did their colleagues. Linear regression analyses revealed that the factor self-determination was an explanatory variable of stress levels among caregivers with no formal competence, and self-determination and impact among caregivers with formal competence. Linear regression analysis revealed that different dimensions in structural and psychological empowerment explained the variance in staff job satisfaction, perceived stress symptoms and quality of care. Conclusions  No formal competence seems to be a risk factor for psychosomatic health problems. Implications for nursing management  Managers need to have a strategic plan for how to create a working environment for caregivers with no formal competence. Caregivers' self-determination seems to be important for stress symptoms. Meaning, self-determination, impact and opportunities appear to be important for job satisfaction and competence, opportunities, resources and formal power for quality of care.

  • 18.
    Engström, Maria
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science.
    Wadensten, Barbro
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala universitet.
    Häggström, Elisabeth
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science.
    Caregivers' job satisfaction and empowerment before and after an intervention focused on caregiver empowerment2010In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 14-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: To evaluate a training programme aimed at strengthening caregivers' self-esteem and empowering them, and also to study correlations between psychological empowerment and job satisfaction.

    Background: Structural and psychological empowerment have received increased attention in nursing management, yet few intervention studies on this topic, based on theoretical assumptions, have been conducted in elderly care.

    Method: Data on self-assessed psychological empowerment and job satisfaction were collected in an intervention (n = 14) and a comparison group (n = 32), before and after the intervention.

    Results: When compared over time in the respective groups, there were significant improvements in the intervention group regarding the factor criticism (job satisfaction scale). There were no statistically significant differences in the comparison group. Total empowerment and all factors of empowerment correlated positively with total job satisfaction. Six out of eight factors of job satisfaction correlated positively with total empowerment.

    Conclusions: Caregivers' perception of criticism can improve through an intervention aimed at strengthening their self-esteem and empowering them.

    Implications for nursing management: Intervention focused on psychological empowerment and especially caregivers' communication skills seems to be beneficial for caregivers. Recommendations are to increase the programme's length and scope and to include all staff at the unit. However, these recommendations need to be studied further.

  • 19.
    Eriksson, Henrik
    et al.
    Röda Korset Högskola.
    Christiansen, Mats
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Holmgren, Jessica
    Röda Korset Högskola; Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Engström, Annica
    Mälardalens Högskola.
    Salzmann-Erikson, Martin
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science. Oslo University Hospital.
    Nursing under the skin: a netnographic study of metaphors and meanings in nursing tattoos2014In: Nursing Inquiry, ISSN 1320-7881, E-ISSN 1440-1800, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 318-326Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aims of this study were to present themes in nursing motifs as depicted in tattoos and to describe how it reflects upon nursing in popular culture as well as within professional nursing culture. An archival and cross-sectional observational study was conducted online to search for images of nursing tattoos that were freely available, by utilizing the netnographic methodology. The 400 images were analyzed in a process that consisted of four analytical steps focusing on metaphors and meanings in the tattoos.

    The findings present four themes: angels of mercy and domination; hegemonic nursing technology; embodying the corps; and nurses within the belly of the monster. The tattoos serve as a mirror of popular culture and the professional culture of nurses and nursing practice within the context of body art. Body art policy statements have been included in nursing personnel dress code policies. Usually these policies prohibit tattoos that are sexist, symbolize sex or could contribute and reproduce racial oppression. The results show that the tattoos can be interpreted according to several layers of meanings in relation to such policies. We therefore stress that this is an area highly relevant for further analyses in nursing research.

  • 20.
    Eriksson, Henrik
    et al.
    Röda Korsets Högskola; Mälardalens högskola.
    Salzmann-Erikson, Martin
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science. Oslo University Hospital.
    Pringle, Keith
    Uppsala universitet; London Metropolitan University.
    Virtual Invisible Men: privacy and invisibility as forms of privilege in online venues for fathers during early parenthood2014In: Culture, Society and Masculinities, ISSN 1941-5583, E-ISSN 1941-5591, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 52-68Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Given the proliferation of support technology for men entering parenthood in virtual forums this project’s aim was to explore a virtual forum exclusively for fathers and elaborate on gendered questions for men’s parenthood within that milieu. An archival forum study was undertaken using principles for nethnography. The categories presented in the results overall indicate that the online venue creates a privileged invisibility from experiences in “real life” gender relations. This suggests that both horizontal and vertical homo-social dimensions are present in the forum support/negotiations which occur among the forum posters, whereby issues of invisibility and entitlement in some cases take a central position. We suggest that being virtual invisible men entails participation in both a marketplace of opinions and a homo-social competition.

  • 21.
    Ernesäter, Annica
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science.
    National telephone advice nursing in Sweden: patient safety and communication2012Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Ernesäter, Annica
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science.
    Engström, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science.
    Malpractice claims regarding calls to Swedish telephone advice nursing: what went wrong and why?2012In: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, ISSN 1357-633X, E-ISSN 1758-1109, Vol. 18, no 7, p. 379-383Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Ernesäter, Annica
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science.
    Engström, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science.
    Holmström, Inger
    Mälardalens Högskola.
    Winblad, Ulria
    Uppsala Universiet.
    Identification of incident reporting within nurse-led national telephone triage in Sweden2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Ernesäter, Annica
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science.
    Engström, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science.
    Holmström, Inger
    Winblad, Ulrika
    Comparison of malpractice claimed calls versus “normal calls” within Swedish HealthcareDirect – open-ended questions matters2014In: 12thInternational Conference on Communication in Healthcare (ICCH) Amsterdam- theNetherlands, 28 September to 1 October 2014, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Ernesäter, Annica
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Engström, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Holmström, Inger
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Winblad, Ulrika
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Incident reporting in nurse-led national telephone triage in Sweden: The reported errors reveal a pattern that needs to be broken2010In: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, ISSN 1357-633X, E-ISSN 1758-1109, Vol. 16, no 5, p. 243-247Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We conducted a retrospective study of incident reports concerning the national, nurse-led telephone triage system in Sweden. The Swedish Health Care Direct organization (SHD) is staffed by registered nurses who act as telenurses and triage the callers' need for care, using a computerized decision support system. Data were collected during 2007 from all county councils that participated in the SHD and were analysed using content analysis. Incident reports were then compared concerning differences in reported categories and who reported the errors. The 426 incident reports included 452 errors. Of the analysed incident reports, 41% concerned accessibility problems, 25% incorrect assessment, 15% routines/guidelines, 13% technical problems and 6% information and communication. The most frequent outgoing incident reports (i.e. sent from SHD to other health-care providers) concerned accessibility problems and the most frequently incoming reports (i.e. sent to SHD from other health-care providers) concerned incorrect assessment. There was a significant difference (P < 0.001) between outgoing and incoming reports regarding the main category. Telenurses have limited possibilities for referring the caller to their primary health-care provider or specialist, which may cause them to over-triage or under-triage the callers' need for care. This over-triage or under-triage may in turn cause other health-care providers to report incorrect assessment to SHD. The implications for practice are that poor accessibility is a matter that should be addressed and that the reasons for incorrect assessment should be explored.

  • 26.
    Ernesäter, Annica
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science.
    Engström, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science.
    Holmström, Inger
    Mälardalens Högskola.
    Winbland, Ulrika
    Uppsala Universitet.
    Medical errors within Swedish national telephone advice nursing: what went wrong and why?2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Ernesäter, Annica
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science.
    Engström, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science.
    Winblad Spångberg, Ulrika
    Uppsala universitet, Vårdvetenskap.
    Rahmqvist, M
    Holmström, Inger
    Uppsala universitet, Hälso- och sjukvårdsforskning.
    Communication challenges in Swedish telephone advice nursing: analysis of actual calls2011Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Ernesäter, Annica
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science. Uppsala universitet.
    Engström, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science. Uppsala universitet.
    Winblad, Ulrika
    Uppsala universitet.
    Holmström, Inger
    Mälardalens Högskola, Uppsala universitet.
    A comparison of calls subjected to a malpractice claim versus 'normal calls' within the Swedish Healthcare Direct: a case–control study2014In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 4, no 10, p. e005961-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The purpose of this study is to compare communication patterns in calls subjected to a malpractice claim with matched controls. Setting: In many countries, telephone advice nursing is patients' first contact with healthcare. Telenurses' assessment of callers' symptoms and needs are based on verbal communication only, and problems with over-triage and under-triage have been reported. Participants: A total sample of all reported medical errors (n=33) during the period 2003-2010 within Swedish Healthcare Direct was retrieved. Corresponding calls were thereafter identified and collected as sound files from the manager in charge at the respective call centres. For technical reasons, calls from four of the cases were not possible to retrieve. For the present study, matched control calls (n=26) based on the patient's age, gender and main symptom presented by the caller were collected. Results: Male patients were in majority (n=16), and the most common reasons for calling were abdominal pain (n=10) and chest pain (n=5). There were statistically significant differences between the communication in the cases and controls: telenurses used fewer open-ended medical questions (p<0.001) in the cases compared to the control calls; callers provided telenurses with more medical information in the control calls compared to the cases (p=0.001); and telenurses used more facilitation and patient activation activities in the control calls (p=0.034), such as back-channel response (p=0.001), compared to the cases. Conclusions: The present study shows that telenurses in malpractice claimed calls used more closed-ended questioning compared to those in control calls, who used more open-ended questioning and back-channel response, which provided them with richer medical descriptions and more information from the caller. Hence, these communicative techniques are important in addition to solid medical and nursing competence and sound decision aid systems.

  • 29.
    Ernesäter, Annica
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science.
    Engström, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science.
    Winblad, Ulrika
    Uppsala Universitet.
    Holmström, Inger
    Örebro Universitet.
    Communication analysis of all malpractice claimed telephone calls to Swedish Health care Direct (SHD) during 2003-20112012In: / [ed] Kate Sampson, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Hedov, Gerth
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science.
    Annerén, Göran
    Uppsala universitet.
    Bättre stöd åt nyblivna föräldrar till barn med livslångt funktionshinder: förslag till nya riktlinjer2010In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 107, no 22, p. 1477-1479Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Hellström-Hyson, Eva
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science.
    Mårtensson, Gunilla
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science. Uppsala universitet.
    Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science. Uppsala universitet.
    To take responsibility or to be an onlooker: Nursing students' experiences of two models of supervision2012In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 105-110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: The present study aimed at describing how nursing students engaged in their clinical practice experienced two models of supervision: supervision on student wards and traditional supervision. BACKGROUND: Supervision for nursing students in clinical practice can be organized in different ways. In the present study, parts of nursing students' clinical practice were carried out on student wards in existing hospital departments. The purpose was to give students the opportunity to assume greater responsibility for their clinical education and to apply the nursing process more independently through peer learning. METHOD: A descriptive design with a qualitative approach was used. Interviews were carried out with eight nursing students in their final semester of a 3-year degree program in nursing. The data were analyzed using content analysis. FINDINGS: Two themes were revealed in the data analysis: When supervised on the student wards, nursing students experienced assuming responsibility and finding one's professional role, while during traditional supervision, they experienced being an onlooker and having difficulties assuming responsibility. CONCLUSIONS: Supervision on a student ward was found to give nursing students a feeling of acknowledgment and more opportunities to develop independence, continuity, cooperation and confidence.

  • 32.
    Hofsten, Anna
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Medical science.
    Andersson, Inger
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science.
    Häggström, Elisabeth
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science.
    Case seminars open new doors to understanding: nursing students’ experiences of learning2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    The Case Method is a teaching method in which cases from real life inspire students to actively seek knowledge that they discuss in seminars. During seminars, different solutions and ideas are written in a structured way on the white board. Hofsten (2010) described how case seminars in cardiology help nursing students share knowledge and identify possible ways of dealing with patients.

    Summary of work

    To deepen the understanding of learning in case seminars, we asked students in a very different educational context, psychiatric care, about their experiences. Written narratives from 44 nursing students were analyzed using a content analysis.

    Summary of results

    The students described the importance of different perspectives and of seeing a context and of learning in a climate that promotes discussions; they felt that the overview on the white board encouraged students to participate. Different categories and the preliminary themes To reflect on thoughts, To give and take, and To see what is said are shown in Figure 1. When we presented these results to the students, most reported recognizing our description of learning situation to a great or very great degree; see Figure 2.

    Conclusions

    The Case Method seems to involve students in a way that deepens their understanding and this effect seems to be independent of subject or teacher

  • 33.
    Hofsten, Anna
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Medical science.
    Gustafsson, Christina
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Culture Studies, Religious Studies and Educational Sciences, Curriculum studies.
    Häggström, Elisabeth
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science.
    Case seminars open doors to deeper understanding: Nursing students’ experiences of learning2010In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 30, no 6, p. 533-538Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    The Case Method is a teaching method in which cases from real life inspire students to actively seek knowledge that they discuss in structured seminars. Case seminars in health education have been evaluated, compared and discussed, but descriptions that can help us understand how students learn in the seminars have not previously been published. In a Swedish nursing programme, where case seminars have been used for several years, students were asked to write about their experiences of learning in the seminars. The aim of the present study was to describe this learning process from the students' point of view.

    METHOD:

    Written data were analysed using content analysis.

    FINDINGS:

    A theme concerning how the Case Method opens doors to deeper understanding was identified as a thread running through different codes and categories. Students described the importance of new perspectives and their wish to participate in discussions with other students. The students indicated that the structure, which involved pre-prepared cases and writing on the white board, positioned their own knowledge in a wider context and that the learning atmosphere enabled everyone to participate.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    The Case Method seems to involve students in a way that deepens their understanding and critical thinking.

  • 34.
    Hofsten, Anna
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Medical science.
    Häggström, Elisabeth
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Alternating large group seminars using the white board with small group discussions helps students be active and reflective2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Discussion and reflection are important in university education, and in healthcare education patient cases are commonly used for this purpose. Learning in case seminars has recently been the topic of a systematic BEME review, which called for more qualitative research on how students learn and how much structure is required (1).

    Summary of work

    The number of students in healthcare education is increasing, and case seminars can involve as many as twenty students. How can we increase students’ opportunities for reflection? To address this question, we alternated large group with small group (three students) discussion approximately four times during a case. Large group discussion including white board notes was unaltered. To understand more about how students learn, we asked them to describe their learning in these kinds of seminars. Written data were collected in September 2013 from 68/80 students in a Swedish nursing program with case seminars. The narratives were analyzed using latent qualitative content analysis (2).

    Summary of results

    Three themes describing how students learn were identified in the analysis: Being active, Being part of a discussion and Seeing new problems and solutions. The analysis with examples of quotations will be presented at the conference.

    Conclusions

    In the small group, students were able to test ideas and build self-confidence, allowing them to act as problem-solvers in the large group discussion. Alternating large group seminars using the white board with small group discussions helps students be active and reflective and allows larger numbers of students per seminar.

  • 35.
    Hofsten, Anna
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Medical science.
    Häggström, Elisabeth
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science.
    Case seminars open doors to deeper understanding: Nursing students’ experiences of learning2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Creation of new knowledge is mainly accomplished by students themselves, and the main task of teachers in higher education is thus to facilitate this learning process (Ramsden 2003). The Case Method is a teaching method in which cases from real life inspire students to actively seek knowledge to be discussed in structured seminars. In the seminars, the problem-solving process is important and the aim of the seminar discussion is to consider different solutions and identify possible ways of dealing with the situation. Case seminars in health education have been evaluated and discussed, but descriptions that can help us understand how students learn in the seminars have not previously been published. In a Swedish nursing programme, where case seminars have been used in teaching cardiovascular diseases for several years, students were asked to describe how the case seminars had helped them in their learning and what had been troublesome with the seminars, and 69/72 did. The aim of the present study was to describe this learning process from the students’ point of view.

    Methods: Written data were analyzed using content analysis, a process of organizing and integrating qualitative information into themes, categories and codes. All quotations were read and commented on by the three authors, but the analysis was made by two of the authors in collaboration.

    Results: A theme concerning how the Case Method opens doors to deeper understanding was identified as a thread running through different codes and categories. Students described the importance of new perspectives and their wish to participate in discussions with other students. The structure, which involved pre-prepared cases and writing on the white board, positioned the students’ own knowledge in a wider context and the learning atmosphere seemed to enable everyone to participate in the discussions (Hofsten et al 2009).

    Discussion: The interest in reflective discussions, other students’ points of view and solutions to the cases indicate a deep approach to learning (Ramsden 2003). Two years later the findings were presented to the students who participated in the study. All students agreed much or very much to the analysis presented.

    Conclusion: The Case Method seems to involve students in a way that deepens their understanding and critical thinking.

  • 36.
    Hofsten, Anna
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Medical science.
    Häggström, Elisabeth
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science.
    Case seminars open doors to deeper understanding: Nursing students’ experiences of learning2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Creation of new knowledge is mainly accomplished by students themselves, and the main task of teachers in higher education is thus to facilitate this learning process. The Case Method is a teaching method in which cases from real life inspire students to actively seek knowledge that they discuss in structured seminars. Case seminars in health education have been evaluated, compared and discussed, but descriptions that can help us understand how students learn in the seminars have not previously been published. In a Swedish nursing programme, where case seminars have been used in teaching cardiovascular diseases for several years, students were asked to freely write down answers to three open questions concerning how the case seminars had helped them in their learning,what had been troublesome with the seminars, and whether they had any other comments on the seminars. The aim of the present study was to describe this learning process from the students’ point of view.

    Methods

    Written data were analyzed using content analysis, which is a process of organizing and integrating qualitative information into themes, categories and codes.

    Findings

    A theme concerning how the Case Method opens doors to deeper understanding was identified as a thread running through different codes and categories. Students described the importance of new perspectives and their wish to participate in discussions with other students. The structure, which involved pre-prepared cases and writing on the white board, seemed to position the students’ own knowledge in a wider context.This interest in reflective discussions andother students’ different opinions indicate a deep approach to learning. To see if the findings reflected the participants ́ voice, the analysis with quotations, codes, categories and a theme was presented two years later to 62/69 students participating in the study. In a questionnaire after the presentation all agreed much or very much with the findings presented. To conclude the Case Method seems to involve students in a way that deepens their understanding and critical thinking.

  • 37.
    Hofsten, Anna
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Medical science.
    Häggström, Elisabeth
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science.
    Case-seminarier – ett sätt att med patientfall engagera studenter till djupinlärning2010In: FOU-dagen: aktuell forskning och utveckling för alla intresserade i landstinget / [ed] Centrum för forskning och utveckling / Uppsala universitet, Landstinget Gävleborg, 2010, p. 23-23Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 38.
    Hofsten, Anna
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Medical science.
    Häggström, Elisabeth
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science.
    Caseseminarier öppnar dörrar till djupare förståelse2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Ny kunskap skapas av studenten själv och lärarens uppgift i högskolan är därför huvudsakligen att underlätta denna lärprocess. I sjuksköterskeutbildningen i Gävle har vi i mer än tio år arbetat med studentaktiva undervisningsformer och under de senaste fem åren bedrivit forskning om studenters lärande. Av dessa olika forskningsprojekt väljer jag att här presentera och diskutera två projekt om studenters lärande vid caseseminarier. Casemetoden utvecklades ursprungligen för jurist- och ekonomistudenter och använder äkta fall som ska inspirerar studenter att aktivt söka kunskap (1,2,3). I vårdundervisning utgår vi från patientfall där sjukdomar och olika lösningar på problem diskuteras i strukturerade lärarledda seminarier (3,4). Casemetoden har på olika sätt utvärderats och diskuteras men beskrivande studier av hur studenter lär vid caseseminarier har tidigare saknats varför våra studier tillför ny kunskap som också publicerats (5).

    Casemetoden i undervisning av sjuksköterskor

    För att öka förståelsen för hur studenter lär bad vi alla andraårsstudenter i en kurs om hjärtsjukdomar berätta om sitt lärande i caseseminarier. Syftet med studien var att belysa lärandet från studenternas perspektiv. 69 studenter från sjuksköterskeprogrammet deltog och deras skrivna berättelser analyserades med hjälp av en innehållsanalys (6). Studenterna beskrev på olika sätt kreativa seminarier som gav nya perspektiv i diskussionerna tillsammans med andra studenter, men också problem med att göra sig hörda och vikten av bekräftelse. Upplägget, med egna förberedelser av patientfall och hur tavlan användes under seminarierna, gav enligt studenterna ökad förståelse för sambanden mellan sjukdomars symtom, diagnos och vård och den tillåtande atmosfären gav en lust att ställa frågor och diskutera. Intresse för reflektion och nya lösningar var tydligt och ett tema om djupare förståelse kunde ses som en röd tråd i berättelserna (5). Efter avslutad analys valde vi att presenterade resultaten för de deltagande studenterna. Av 62/69 närvarande studenterna ansåg alla att vår analys stämde väl eller mycket väl med deras erfarenheter av lärande i caseseminarier.

    För att undersöka våra resultat oberoende av kurs, studenter och lärare återupprepade vi våra frågeställningar i en ny studie år 2011. Nu i en helt annan context, med sjuksköterskestudenter i psykiatrisk omvårdnad och med två kliniska adjunkter som lärare. I denna lite mindre kurs deltog 34 studenter med berättelser om sitt lärande. Analysen gav åtta kategorier samlade i tre teman Att reflektera tankar, Att ge och ta och Att se vad som sägs. Även dessa resultat presenterades för               

    Vår slutsats är att Casemetoden öppnar dörrar till djupare förståelse oberoende av lärare och kurs i sjuksköterskeprogrammet. Slutligen, vilka styrkor och svagheter har de här studierna och är resultaten något ni känner igen från er egen undervisning med studentaktiva undervisningsformer?

    1. Barnes, L.B., Christensen, C.R., Hansen, A.J., 1994. Teaching and the Case Method. Harvard Business School Press. Boston, Massachusetts.
    2. Erskine J.A., Leenders M.R., Mauffette-Leenders L.A., 2003. Teaching with Cases. IveyPublishing, Richard Ivey School of Business, The University of Western Ontario, London,Ontario, Canada.
    3. Nordquist J., Sundberg K., Johansson L., 2011. Case – verktyg för professionslärande. Liber AB, Stockholm.
    4. Stjernquist M., Crang-Svalenius E., 2007. Problem based learning and the case method - medical students change preferences during clerkship. Medical Teacher 29, 814-820.
    5. Hofsten A., Gustafsson C, Häggström E., 2010. Case seminars open doors to deeper understanding - Nursing students’ experiences of learning. Nurse Educ Today 30, 533–538.
    6. Graneheim, U.H., Lundman B., 2004. Qualitative content analysis in nursing research:concepts, procedures and measures to achieve trustworthiness. Nurse Education Today 24,105-112.

     

  • 39.
    Häggström, Elisabeth
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science.
    Mamhidir, Anna-Greta
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science.
    Kihlgren, Annica
    Health Academy, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Caregivers' strong commitment to their relationship with older people2010In: International Journal of Nursing Practice, ISSN 1322-7114, E-ISSN 1440-172X, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 99-105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study was to describe caregivers' good as well as bad experiences of working with older people. The study was based on five focus group interviews. One theme emerged from a latent content analysis: strong commitment to the relationship. This theme functioned as a thread of underlying meaning throughout the entire interpretative process of 48 caregivers' experiences of work. A delicate relationship existed that could be vulnerable and could reveal itself in feelings of lack of knowledge, guilt and fear. The caregivers' committed relationship to the older adults created independency in the ways in which they protected the older people's needs. Further studies are needed that focus on caregivers' transition from dependency to independency. The findings highlight the importance of clinical supervision to personal development and identity, and to promoting caregivers' self-esteem and maintaining a committed relationship. Commitment is a deep human feeling, and it should be promoted in order to maintain and further develop quality care for older adults

  • 40.
    Johansson, Monica Blom
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Carlsson, Marianne
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science.
    Sonnander, Karin
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Communication difficulties and the use of communication strategies: from the perspective of individuals with aphasia2012In: International journal of language and communication disorders, ISSN 1368-2822, E-ISSN 1460-6984, Vol. 47, no 2, p. 144-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: To enhance communicative ability and thereby the possibility of increased participation of persons with aphasia, the use of communication strategies has been proposed. However, little is known about how persons with aphasia experience having conversations and how they perceive their own and their conversation partner's use of communication strategies.

    AIMS: To explore how people with aphasia experience having conversations, how they handle communication difficulties, and how they perceive their own and their communication partners' use of communication strategies. Methods &

    PROCEDURES: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with four women and seven men with chronic aphasia (n = 11). Interviews were video-recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed by qualitative content analysis.

    OUTCOMES & RESULTS: Informants appreciated having conversations despite the fact that they perceived their aphasia as a serious hindrance. Different factors related to the informants, the conversation partners, the conversation itself and the physical environment were perceived to impact on conversations. The importance of the communication partners' knowledge and understanding of aphasia and their use of supporting conversation strategies were acknowledged by the informants. The informants' views on using communication aid devices or strategies varied considerably. Four themes that characterized the informants' narratives were: loss and frustration, fear and uncertainty, shared responsibility based on knowledge, and longing for the past or moving forward.

    CONCLUSIONS & IMPLICATIONS: The informants longed to regain their former language ability and role as an active participant in society. To enhance participation of persons with aphasia, it is suggested that communication partner training should be an important and integral part of aphasia rehabilitation. Important elements of such training are reflecting on communication behaviours, training in real-life situations, and acknowledging each individual's special needs and preferences. To deal with the consequences of aphasia, counselling and psychological support may be needed.

  • 41.
    Kaltenbrunner Nykvist, Monica
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Bengtsson, Lars
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Engström, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science.
    Towards a Questionnaire to Measure Lean in Health Care2014In: 8th NOVO Symposium, Sustainable health care production systems - Abstract book / [ed] Kasper Edwards och Jørgen Winkel, Lyngby: Danmarks Tekniske Universitet, DTU, 2014, p. 19-20Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The rapid spread of Lean implementation within the health care sector has made it urgent to evaluate the effects of Lean on productivity, working conditions and health. Therefor an instrument is needed to measure Lean in primary care. The aim with this research is to find an instrument that captures the character of Lean. A literature search was conducted in Academic Search Elite, WileyOnlineLibrary, PubMed, Cinahl, PsycInfo, JSTOR, ScienceDirect, Emerald and Scopus. Keywords used were reflecting Lean and measurement and the search resulted in 7933 hits. Included were articles that presented an instrument that had the possibilities to distinguish between high or low Lean adoption. Malmbrandt and Åhlstöm´s (2014) instrument fulfilled criteria and was chosen. The original instrument was firstly translated to Swedish. A back translation was made by a bilingual authorized translator. The prototype will be tested among health care professions in Sweden using the think aloud method (TA) with the aim to explore how the participants perceive and interpret the Swedish version (Collins 2003). Immediately afterwards, they will be interviewed about how they interprets specific expressions in the questionnaire. After every round of 5-15 interviews the prototype will be adjusted and when saturation is reached the TA will terminate. After psychometric tests the finalized Swedish version of the instrument is to be used in a longitudinal study to describe status of Lean and how Lean correlate with the health of primary health care staff, there working conditions and productivity over time.

  • 42. Kaminski, Elenor
    et al.
    Carlsson, Marianne
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science.
    Röing, Marta
    Holmström, Inger K.
    ‘If I didn’t trust Swedish Healthcare Direct, I would never call’ – views of making pediatric health calls2013In: Clinical Nursing Studies, ISSN 2324-7959, Vol. 1, no 3, p. 57-69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The focus of the presented research is parents’ expectations and experiences of calling Swedish Healthcare Direct (SHD)regarding pediatric health issues. Telenursing is a rapidly expanding service and SHD handles up to 2.4 million pediatrichealth calls yearly. Mothers make the majority of the calls and reportedly receive self-care advice more than fathers.Parents’ views are important for the development and safe use of telenursing health services. The study is qualitative, withan exploratory and descriptive design. Twenty-one interviews with parents were analysed using content analysis.According to the interviewees, the decision to contact SHD or not is influenced by their degree of worry or trust in theservice. Calls are carefully prepared, and who will call is often predetermined and affected by gender. Parents want to begiven a chance to speak first in their communication with telenurses. They want to be listened to carefully and to beaccorded respect, to have their needs fully explored and to have their concerns relieved. Most parents follow telenurses’recommendations, a few exclusively. Some primarily trust their own intuition. Learning is frequent, implying the publichealth potential of calls, not least for foreign-born callers. Exploring parents’ expectations provides insight into parents’worries, potential to increase parents’ learning and may develop their trust in telenurses’ recommendations. Telenurses’awareness of gender impact can further develop the telenursing health service in providing safe care on equal terms for avulnerable patient group, children.

  • 43. Kaminsky, Elenor
    et al.
    Carlsson, Marianne
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden .
    Holmström, Inger K
    Larsson, Jan
    Fredriksson, Mio
    Goals of telephone nursing work - the managers' perspectives: a qualitative study on Swedish Healthcare Direct2014In: BMC Health Services Research, ISSN 1472-6963, E-ISSN 1472-6963, Vol. 14, p. 188-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Swedish Healthcare Direct (SHD) receives 6 million calls yearly and aims at increased public sense of security and healthcare efficiency. Little is known about what SHD managers perceive as the primary goals of telephone nursing (TN) work and how the organisation matches goals of health promotion and equitable healthcare, so important in Swedish healthcare legislation. The aim of the study was to explore and describe what the SHD managers perceive as the goals of TN work and how the managers view health promotion and implementation of equitable healthcare with gender as example at SHD.

    METHODS: The study was qualitative using an exploratory and descriptive design. All 23 managers employed at SHD were interviewed and data analysis used deductive directed content analysis.

    RESULTS: The findings reveal four themes describing the goals of TN work as recommended by the SHD managers. These are: 'create feelings of trust', 'achieve patient safety', 'assess, refer and give advice', and 'teach the caller'. Most of the managers stated that health promotion should not be included in the goals, whereas equitable healthcare was viewed as an important issue. Varying suggestions for implementing equitable healthcare were given.

    CONCLUSIONS: The interviewed managers mainly echoed the organisational goals of TN work. The managers' expressed goal of teaching lacked the caller learning components highlighted by telenurses in previous research. The fact that health promotion was not seen as important indicates a need for SHD to clarify its goals as the organisation is part of the Swedish healthcare system, where health promotion should always permeate work. Time used for health promotion and dialogues in a gender equitable manner at SHD is well invested as it will save time elsewhere in the health care system, thereby facing one of the challenges of European health systems.

  • 44.
    Kihlgren, Annica
    et al.
    School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Sunvisson, Helena
    School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Ziegert, Kristina
    School of Social and Health Sciences, Halmstad University, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Mamhidir, Anna-Greta
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Referrals to emergency departments: the processes and factors that influence decision-making among community nurses2014In: Open Journal of Nursing, ISSN 2162-5336, E-ISSN 2162-5344, Vol. 4, no 5, p. 366-374Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to describe the basis on which municipal care registered nurses (RN) make decisions and their experiences when referring older persons from nursing homes to emergency departments (EDs). RNS’ in the community are to ensure that older adults receive good care quality in nursing home. This study used a descriptive design with a qualitative content analysis. The analysis of the data from the 13 interviews revealed one theme “Shared responsibilities in the best interests of the older person reduce feelings of insufficiency”. The content was formulated, which revealed the RNs’ feelings, reasoning and factors influencing them and their actions in the decision-making situation, before the patients were referred to an emergency department. Complex illnesses, non-adapted organizations, considerations about what was good and right in order to meet the older person’s needs, taking account of her/his life-world, health, well-being and best interests were reported. Co-worker competencies and open dialogues in the “inner circle” were crucial for the nurses’ confidence in the decision. Hesitation to refer was associated with previous negative reactions from ED professionals. The RN sometimes express that they lacked medical knowledge and were uncertain how to judge the acute illness or changes. Access to the “outer circle”, i.e. physicians and hospital colleagues, was necessary to counteract feelings of insecurity about referrals. When difficult decisions have to be made, not only medical facts but also relationships are of importance. To strengthen the RNs’ and staff members’ competence by means of education seems to be important for avoiding unnecessary referrals. Guidelines and work routine need to be more transparent and referrals due to the lack of resources are not only wasteful but can worsen the older persons’ health.

  • 45. Kihlgren, Annica
    et al.
    Wimo, Anders
    Mamhidir, Anna-Greta
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science. Uppsala universitet.
    Older patients referred by community nurses to emergency departments: a descriptive cross-sectional follow-up study in a Swedish context2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 97-103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The objective of this study was to examine on what extent nursing home (NH) older patients aged 75 or older, referred to hospitals by registered nurses (RNs) in the community, utilise the emergency department (ED) over a 1-year period and for what reason. A further objective was to identify factors that may explain these referrals. Methods: A cross-sectional follow-up study, examining older patients' disabilities, resources and needs, was carried out in a county in Sweden. Assessments were made using Residents Assessment Instrument/Minimum Data Set, among 719 individuals in 24 NHs and the RNs' documentation were followed. Results: The result showed that of 719 residents, 209 accounted for 314 referrals to an ED over the 1-year period. No gender differences were observed. The main reasons for referrals were falls (23%), cardiovascular problems (16%), gastrointestinal problems (12%) and infections (11%). Most of the referrals (65%) were made on weekdays during daytime hours. In 62% of the cases, there had been a consultation with a physician prior to the referral. The nursing documentation was poor in connection with the referral. Conclusion: Older patients with dementia diseases were significant less refereed and questions are raised whether this group is undetected and undertreated, and therefore, it is important with further investigation. 

  • 46.
    Knudsen, Kati
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science. Centre for Research & Development, Uppsala University/County Council of Gävleborg, Gävle, Sweden; Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Section for Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Högman, Marieann
    Larsson, Anders
    Nilsson, Ulrica
    The best method to predict easy intubation: a quasi-experimental pilot study2014In: Journal of Perianesthesia Nursing, ISSN 1089-9472, E-ISSN 1532-8473, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 292-297Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE:

    To facilitate evaluation of the airway before endotracheal intubation, different scores have been developed, mainly to predict difficult airways. However, in anesthesia clinical practice in Sweden, scores would be more useful if they could also predict an easy airway, so that the correct category of anesthesia personnel can be allocated. Therefore, we evaluated whether scoring systems commonly used to predict difficult airways could also predict easy endotracheal intubation.

    DESIGN:

    This prospective observational study included patients who were scheduled for general anesthesia and required endotracheal intubation.

    METHODS:

    Airways were evaluated preoperatively by two independent variables, namely Mallampati classification and thyromental distance. After anesthesia induction, the Cormack and Lehane grade was assessed.

    FINDING:

    Mallampati scores yielded the highest specificity in predicting easy intubation, and Cormack and Lehane grades yielded the highest positive predictive value for predicting easy intubation.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Mallampati classification is an appropriate screening test for predicting easy intubation.

  • 47.
    Knudsen, Kati
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Pöder, Ulrika
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Högman, Marieann
    Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden, and Centre for Research & Development Uppsala University/ County Council of Gävleborg, Gavle, Sweden.
    Larsson, Anders
    Department of surgical sciences, Uppsala University, Anaesthesiology & ICM, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Ulrica
    School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    A nationwide postal questionnaire survey: The presence of airway guidelines in anaesthesia department in Sweden2014In: BMC Anesthesiology, ISSN 1471-2253, E-ISSN 1471-2253, Vol. 14, no 25, p. 25-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    In Sweden, airway guidelines aimed toward improving patient safety have been recommended by the Swedish Society of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care Medicine. Adherence to evidence-based airway guidelines is known to be generally poor in Sweden. The aim of this study was to determine whether airway guidelines are present in Swedish anaesthesia departments.

    Methods

    A nationwide postal questionnaire inquiring about the presence of airway guidelines was sent out to directors of Swedish anaesthesia departments (n = 74). The structured questionnaire was based on a review of the Swedish Society of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care voluntary recommendations of guidelines for airway management. Mean, standard deviation, minimum/maximum, percentage (%) and number of general anaesthesia performed per year as frequency (n), were used to describe, each hospital type (university, county, private). For comparison between hospitals type and available written airway guidelines were cross tabulation used and analysed using Pearson’s Chi-Square tests. A p- value of less than 0 .05 was judged significant.

    Results

    In total 68 directors who were responsible for the anaesthesia departments returned the questionnaire, which give a response rate of 92% (n 68 of 74). The presence of guidelines showing an airway algorithm was reported by 68% of the departments; 52% reported having a written patient information card in case of a difficult airway and guidelines for difficult airways, respectively; 43% reported the presence of guidelines for preoperative assessment; 31% had guidelines for Rapid Sequence Intubation; 26% reported criteria for performing an awake intubation; and 21% reported guidelines for awake fibre-optic intubation. A prescription for the registered nurse anaesthetist for performing tracheal intubation was reported by 24%. The most frequently pre-printed preoperative elements in the anaesthesia record form were dental status and head and neck mobility.

    Conclusions

    Despite recommendations from the national anaesthesia society, the presence of airway guidelines in Swedish anaesthesia departments is low. From the perspective of safety for both patients and the anaesthesia staff, airway management guidelines should be considered a higher priority.

  • 48.
    Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Johansson, Ingela
    Linköpings universitet.
    Brännström, Margareta
    Umeå universitet.
    Arenhall, Eva
    Örebro universitet.
    Baigi, Amir
    Landstinget Halland Primärvården.
    Brunt, David
    Växjö universitet.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Hälsohögskolan Jönköping.
    Nilsson, Ulrica
    Örebro universitet.
    Persson, Sylvi
    Växjö universitet.
    Rask, Mikael
    Växjö universitet.
    Wieslander, Inger
    Hälsohögskolan Jönköping.
    Ivarsson, Bodil
    Lunds universitet.
    Evaluation of a Swedish version of the Watts Sexual Function Questionnaire (WSFQ) in persons with heart disease: a pilot study2010In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 168-174Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: As part of preparation for a Swedish multicentre study, exploring sexual and married life in patients with myocardial infarction and their partners, a Swedish validated instrument was required.

    Aims: The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the validity and reliability of a Swedish version of the Watts Sexual Function Questionnaire (WSFQ) among persons with a heart disease.

    Methods: A convenience sample of 79 persons (47 men and 32 women) living with a heart disease was recruited from the members of the National Association of Heart and Lung Patients. They completed a Swedish version of the WSFQ on two occasions.

    Results: Two separate factor analyses each revealed a two-factor structure on both occasions: “Sexual appetite” and “Sexual expectations” with gender-neutral questions and “Sexual sensitiveness” and “Sexual ability” with gender-specific questions. Cronbach's alpha coefficients ranged from 0.48 to 0.86 and test–retest values for all but one question exceeded 0.70.

    Conclusions: The Swedish version of the WSFQ showed good validity and stability and acceptable internal homogeneity. Extended evaluations of the questionnaire are recommended.

  • 49.
    Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science. University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Section of Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Lindqvist, Ragny
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science. University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science.
    Nilsson, Annika
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science. University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science.
    Relationships between coping, coping resources and quality of life in patients with chronic illness: a pilot study2011In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 476-483Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden there are approximately about 3500 end-stage renal disease and 250 000 chronic heart failure patients. 

    Objectives: The original purpose of the study was to determine differences between two groups of patients with chronic illness (end-stage renal disease and chronic heart failure) regarding the following study variables: coping, sense of coherence, self-efficacy and quality of life. Following this, the aim was to explore the relationships between demographic variables (sex, age, educational level and living area) and quality of life as well as between coping, sense of coherence, self-efficacy and quality of life for the combined sample of patients with end-stage renal disease and chronic heart failure.

    Methods: A comparative and correlative design was used with a sample of 100 patients (n=41 end-stage renal disease, n=59 chronic heart failure). The data were collected during 2004, using four standardized questionnaires and regression analyses were conducted.

    Results: No significant differences were found between the two groups. Positive correlations were identified between sense of coherence, general self-efficacy and quality of life, whereas negative correlations emerge between emotion-focused coping, sense of coherence, general self-efficacy and quality of life. Sense of coherence, general self-efficacy and emotion-focused coping explained 40% of the variance in quality of life. Those with low sense of coherence and general self-efficacy showed negative correlations between emotion-focused coping and quality of life, whereas no such correlations were shown for those with high values on sense of coherence and general self-efficacy.    

    Conclusions: The present results on coping and quality of life correspond with previous research regarding how other groups with chronic illness handled their daily life. Preliminary results indicate that how individuals tackle their present situation is more important than which chronic illness they have. Women used more emotion-focused coping than men, which constitute an important finding for further research.

  • 50.
    Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science.
    Mårtensson, Gunilla
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science.
    Stöd och utmaningar i verksamhetsförlagd utbildning - vem bidrar till lärandet ur studenters perspektiv?2013In: / [ed] SSF, 2013Conference paper (Other academic)
123 1 - 50 of 146
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