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  • 1.
    Abbasi, Seyed
    et al.
    Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran; Mid-Sweden University; Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.
    Sundin, Örjan
    Mid-Sweden University.
    Jalali, Arash
    Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran.
    Soares, Joaquim
    Mid-Sweden University.
    Macassa, Gloria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Public Health and Sport Science, Public Health Science. Mid-Sweden University.
    Mortality from Acute Coronary Syndrome: Does Place of Residence Matter?2022In: Journal of Teheran University Heart Center, ISSN 1735-8620, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 56-61Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Current evidence shows inequality in the outcomes of rural and urban patients treated at their place of residence. This study compared in-hospital mortality between rural and urban patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) to find whether there were differences in the outcome and received treatment.

    Methods: Between May 2007 and January 2018, patients admitted with ACS were included. The patients’ demographic, clinical, and laboratory data, as well as their in-hospital medical courses, were recorded. The association between place of residence (rural/urban) and in-hospital mortality due to ACS was evaluated using logistic regression adjusted for potential confounders.

    Results: Of 9088 recruited patients (mean age =61.30±12.25 y; 5557 men [61.1%]), 838 were rural residents. A positive family history of coronary artery disease (P=0.003), smoking (P=0.002), and hyperlipidemia (P=0.026), as well as a higher body mass index (P=0.013), was seen more frequently in the urban patients, while the rural patients had lower education levels (P<0.001) and higher unemployment rates (P=0.009). In-hospital mortality occurred in 135 patients (1.5%): 10 rural (1.2%) and 125 urban (1.5%) patients (P=0.465). The Firth regression model, used to adjust the effects of possible confounders, showed no significant difference concerning in-hospital mortality between the rural and urban patients (OR, 1.57; 95% CI, 0.376 to 7.450; P=0.585).

    Conclusion: This study found no significant differences in receiving proper treatment and in-hospital mortality between rural and urban patients with ACS.

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  • 2.
    Ahmadi, Elena
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Lundqvist, Daniel
    Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Division of Education and Sociology, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Bergström, Gunnar
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Macassa, Gloria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Public Health and Sport Science, Public Health Science.
    A qualitative study of factors that managers in small companies consider important for their wellbeing2023In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 18, no 1, article id 2286669Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    Given the importance of small businesses for society, and the significance of managers’ wellbeing for employee health, leadership, and business performance, more knowledge is needed on the sources of managers’ wellbeing. This study explored factors within the small business context that were perceived by managers to hinder or enable their wellbeing.

    Methods

    Data were collected through qualitative semi-structured interviews with 20 managers from 12 small companies, and analysed with content analysis.

    Results

    The factors that these managers in small businesses experienced as enhancing or hindering their personal wellbeing covered five categories: demands and resources in the daily managerial work, achievement of results, social factors, organizational factors, and individual factors.

    Conclusions

    The specific context of managerial work in small companies encompasses unique factors. For instance, the small company managers’ wellbeing was affected by vulnerability due to the smallness of the business and the absence of available resources. Simultaneously, a small company context provided a strong social climate and close relationships with employees and customers that strengthened the managers’ wellbeing. The findings suggest that the availability of financial, personnel, and organizational resources varies between small companies of different size, which may have implications for small business managers’ work and wellbeing.

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  • 3.
    Ahmadi, Elena
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Lundqvist, Daniel
    Linköpings universitet.
    Bergström, Gunnar
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research. Unit of Intervention and Implementation Research for Worker Health, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Macassa, Gloria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Public Health and Sport Science, Public Health Science. EPIUnit–Instituto de Saude Publica, Universidade do Porto, Porto, Portugal.
    Managers’ and employees’ experiences of how managers’ wellbeing impacts their leadership behaviours in Swedish small businesses2023In: Work: A journal of Prevention, Assessment and rehabilitation, ISSN 1051-9815, E-ISSN 1875-9270, Vol. 75, no 1, p. 97-112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:There is a growing interest in managers’ wellbeing due to the observed associations between their wellbeing and leadership behaviours, and between leadership behaviours and employees’ wellbeing. However, it is still unclear how managers’ wellbeing influences their practiced leadership across different workplace contexts, which specific behaviours are affected, and how this varies across time.

    OBJECTIVE:The purpose of this study was therefore to explore managers’ and employees’ experiences and perceptions regarding the consequences of managers’ wellbeing for their leadership behaviours in small businesses.

    METHODS:Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 37 participants (19 managers and 18 employees) working at 12 Swedish small firms, and analysed using content analysis.

    RESULTS:The findings show that managers were more constructive when they felt well, and more passively destructive when unwell. Variations in managers’ wellbeing influenced their mood, energy level, and performance, as well as the company’s working climate. However, these destructive leadership variations did not have a substantial impact, because several protective factors were present.

    CONCLUSION:This study shows that the wellbeing of managers in small businesses has perceptible consequences for their leadership behaviours. The study also shows that sustained leadership behaviours may coexist with temporary variations of these behaviours on a constructive-destructive continuum depending on the leader’s wellbeing. Overall, the findings contribute to a more nuanced and dynamic understanding of how the interaction between managers’ wellbeing and their behaviours unfolds in the particular context of small companies.

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  • 4.
    Ahmadi, Elena
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Macassa, Gloria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Public Health and Sport Science, Public Health Science. University of Porto.
    Larsson, Johan
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research. LKAB.
    Managers’ work and behaviour patterns in profitable growth SMEs2021In: Small Business Economics, ISSN 0921-898X, E-ISSN 1573-0913, Vol. 57, p. 849-863Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigated managers’ work and behaviour patterns in profitable growth small- and medium-sized Swedish companies, and considered how these patterns might be associated with good health outcomes. Specifically, we looked at hours worked by managers, proportion of time spent on working activities, and leadership behaviour orientation. We used a quantitative cross-sectional design and collected data via a standardized questionnaire that was answered by 133 top managers. The data were analyzed with descriptive statistics, linear regression, and compositional data analysis. Our results indicate that the managers worked long hours, which is a health risk both for them as individuals and for their organizations, but also that they engaged in work practices and leadership behaviours that were favourable for organizational health and for their employees. The managers spent a high proportion of their time in touring, which could be beneficial to organizational health, and exercised active leadership through behaviours that contribute to both employee health and company effectiveness. Comparing our results to other studies, we can observe that patterns of managers’ time use differ between small and large companies, confirming that the size of the firm is an important determinant of managerial work.

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  • 5.
    Aling, Maria
    et al.
    Röda Korsets högskola.
    Lindgren, Agnes
    Röda Korsets högskola.
    Lofall, Hillevi
    Röda Korsets högskola.
    Okenwa-Emegwa, Leah
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Public Health and Sport Science, Public Health Science. Röda Korsets högskola.
    A Scoping Review to Identify Barriers and Enabling Factors for Nurse-Patient Discussions on Sexuality and Sexual Health2021In: Nursing Reports, ISSN 2039-439X, E-ISSN 2039-4403, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 253-266Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Sexuality and sexual health (SSH) are essential aspects of care that have evolved since a 1975 World Health Organization (WHO) report on SSH. However, nurses still consider discussing the subject with patients a challenge. This scoping review aimed to map, synthesize, and summarize findings from existing literature regarding barriers and enabling factors for nurse-patient SSH discussions in care contexts.

    Methods: A scoping review model inspired by Arksey and O'Malley was used to search for and synthesize studies published between 2009 and 2019. The databases searched were the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) and Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online, i.e., MEDLARS Online. A total of nineteen articles were eligible to be included.

    Results: Two main categories of enabling factors were identified, i.e., a professional approach via using core care values and availability of resources. Three major categories of barriers were identified: beliefs and attitudes related to age, gender, and sexual identity; fear and individual convictions; and work-related factors.

    Conclusions: Applying professionalism and core care values as well as making resources available are likely to promote SSH discussions between nurses and patients. Moreover, there is a need for a norm-critical approach in education and practice.

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  • 6.
    Astner, Amanda
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Public Health and Sport Science, Public Health Science.
    Fritidsgårdars arbete med ungdomars upplevda trygghet – en kvalitativ intervjustudie i en svensk storstad2022Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Syftet med den här studien var att i en svensk storstad undersöka fritidsgårdars arbete med ungdomars upplevda trygghet i samhället. En induktiv kvalitativ metod med fyra individuella intervjuer användes för att besvara studiens syfte och frågeställningar genom semistrukturerade frågor. Tre kvinnor och en man deltog i studien och representerade fyra olika fritidsgårdar i den svenska storstaden. Genom en konventionell kvalitativ innehållsanalys kunde insamlat material analyseras och resultatet utmynnade i fem kategorier; Trygghet beskrivs på olika sätt, Trygghetsskapande arbete på fritidsgårdarna, Trygga vuxna, Fritidsgården som en trygg plats och Samverkan för trygghet. Resultatetvisade att fritidsgårdarna i dagsläget inte har ett strukturerat trygghetsarbete men att de arbetar med trygghet på andra sätt, bland annat genom att inkludera ungdomarna på fritidsgårdarna via trygghetsundersökningar och att lyssna till ungdomarnas intressen för att ge möjlighet att kunna vara delaktig i verksamheten. Slutligen visade resultatet att fritidsgården har en stor betydelse för ungdomarna och att den kan vara ett alternativ för ungdomar som väljer mellan att ta den kriminella banan eller inte.

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  • 7.
    Barboza, Madelene
    et al.
    Karolinska institutet.
    Marttila, Anneli
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Public Health and Sport Science, Public Health Science. Karolinska institutet.
    Burström, Bo
    Karolinska institutet.
    Kulane, Asli
    Karolinska institutet.
    Towards health equity: core components of an extended home visiting intervention in disadvantaged areas of Sweden2022In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 22, no 1, article id 1091Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Understanding the mechanisms of implementation of public health interventions in community settings is a key aspect of programme assessments. To determine core components and establish a programme theory are important tools to improve functioning and support dissemination of programme models to new locations. An extended early childhood home visiting intervention has been developed on-site in a socioeconomically disadvantaged area of Sweden since 2013 with the aim of reducing persisting health inequities in the population. This study aimed at investigating the core programme components and how the intervention was perceived to contribute towards health equity from early childhood.

    Methods: Qualitative framework method was applied in a document analysis and subsequent semi-structured interviews with 15 key actors involved in the programme.

    Results: The intervention was found to be constituted of five core components centred around the situation-based, parental strengthening work method delivered by a qualified team of child health care nurse and social worker. The programme theory foresaw positive effects on child and parental health, responsive parenting practices, families' use of welfare services according to need and increased integration and participation in society. The principles of Proportionate Universalism were recognised in the programme theory and the intervention was perceived as an important contribution to creating conditions for improved health equity for the families. Still, barriers to health equity were identified on the structural level which limit the potential impact of the programme.

    Conclusions: The core components of the Extended home visiting programme in Rinkeby correspond well to those of similar evidence-based home visiting interventions. Combining focus on early childhood development and responsive parenting with promoting access to the universal welfare services and integration into society are considered important steppingstones towards health equity. However, a favourable macro-political environment is required in the endeavour to balance the structural determinants' influence on health inequities. Improved availability and accessibility to welfare services that respond to the needs of the families regarding housing, education and employment are priorities.

    Trial registration: The study was retrospectively registered on 11/08/2016 in the ISRCTN registry ( ISRCTN11832097 ).

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  • 8.
    Barthel, Stephan
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building Engineering, Energy Systems and Sustainability Science, Environmental Science.
    Colding, Johan
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building Engineering, Energy Systems and Sustainability Science, Environmental Science.
    Hiswåls, Anne-Sofie
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Public Health and Sport Science, Public Health Science.
    Thalén, Peder
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Humanities, Religious studies.
    Turunen, Päivi
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Criminology, Social Work.
    Urban green commons for socially sustainable cities and communities2022In: Nordic Social Work Research, ISSN 2156-857X, E-ISSN 2156-8588, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 310-322Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In these times of global pandemics and climate crisis, social sustainability has become a crucial issue within diverse sectors and disciplines. This article aims to broaden the discussions on social sustainability in general, and in relation to community work within professional social work in particular.

    By means of a cross-disciplinary bricolage approach – with a focus on the commons – we aim to construct a holistic view of urban social sustainability. Beginning with the Anthropocene concept, which recognizes the human impact on the Earth’s natural systems and hence highlights the need to include the natural environment as a determinant of good and fair living conditions for all, we remix arguments and examples relating to social sustainability with environmental and spatial dimensions to develop an urban green commons. Our cross-disciplinary perspective extends beyond contemporary social policy by bringing together natural resource management, public health, and spiritual aspects of the commons. In order to fit the plurality of urban contexts across the planet, further critical deliberations are needed, focusing on social sustainability and collective action for sustainable change in each context. 

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  • 9.
    Chowdhury, Ehsanul
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Business and Economic Studies, Business administration.
    Backlund Rambaree, Brita
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Criminology, Social Work.
    Macassa, Gloria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Public Health and Sport Science, Public Health Science.
    CSR Reporting of Stakeholders’ Health: Proposal for a New Perspective2021In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 13, no 3, article id 1133Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim of the paper is to identify and categorize disclosures from the Global Reporting Initiative Sustainability Reporting Standards (GRI Standards) that have direct or indirect influence on health of external or internal stakeholders.

    Methodology: GRI core and comprehensive disclosures (as part of universal standards and topic-specific standards related to economic, environmental and social topics) that can be used by businesses for CSR reporting were grouped as to have direct or indirect influence on external and internal stakeholders’ health.

    Findings: The study proposes a systematic way of conceiving GRI standards in terms of direct or indirect influence on the health and well-being of internal and external stakeholders.

    Originality/Value: This is the first study that provides a classification of core and comprehensive GRI disclosures that have direct or indirect influence on the health of external or internal stakeholders. This classification will allow businesses to easily report those CSR activities that might be of importance to stakeholders’ health promotion. 

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  • 10.
    Chowdhury, Mohammad Rocky Khan
    et al.
    First Capital University of Bangladesh.
    Khan, Hafiz T A
    University of West London.
    Rashid, Mamunur
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Public Health and Sport Science, Public Health Science.
    Kabir, Russell
    Anglia Ruskin University, UK.
    Islam, Sazin
    First Capital University of Bangladesh.
    Islam, Md Shariful
    First Capital University of Bangladesh.
    Kader, Manzur
    Karolinska institutet.
    Differences in risk factors associated with single and multiple concurrent forms of undernutrition (stunting, wasting, or underweight) among children under 5 in Bangladesh: A nationally representative cross-sectional study2021In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 11, article id e052814Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The current study aims at differentiating the risk factors of cooccurrence and the single dimension of undernutrition among under-5 children in Bangladesh. 

    Design: A nationally representative cross-sectional study. 

    Setting: Bangladesh.

    Participants: Children age under 5 years of age. 

    Outcome measure: A child is considered to have cooccurrence of undernutrition if he/she has either coexistence of stunting and underweight; wasting and underweight at the same time or the coexistence of stunting, wasting, and underweight. Also, a child with a single dimension of undernutrition includes having stunting, wasting, and being underweight independently.

    Methods: A Chi-square test was used to assess the prevalence of undernutrition. Odds ratio (OR) and confidence interval (CI) of potential risk factors were quantified using logistic regression analysis. 

    Results: Two out of five under-5 children are suffering undernutrition in Bangladesh. The prevalence of cooccurrence and the single dimension of child undernutrition in Bangladesh was 19.3% (95% CI: 18.2, 20.5) and 18.9 (95% CI:17.9, 19.7) respectively. The key risk factors of cooccurrence of undernutrition were children born with small birth weight [AOR-3.40, 95% CI-2.52, 5.57], socio-economically poorest households [AOR-2.29, 95% CI-1.74, 3.01] and children age group 48-59 months [AOR-2.18, 95% CI-1.80, 2.63], on the other hand, children age group 12-23 months [AOR-161, 95% CI-1.35, 1.92], socio-economically poorer households [AOR-1.41, 95% CI-1.09, 1.82] and paternal illiteracy [AOR-1.19, 95% CI-1.01, 1.42] was significantly associated with single dimension of undernutrition. 

    Conclusion: One-fifth of the children are suffering cooccurrence of undernutrition and that is similar as measured by the single dimension of undernutrition. Parental education, mother’s undernutrition status, father’s employment status, children’s age, birth order, and small birth are the main differentiating risk factors of cooccurrence and the single dimension of undernutrition among under-5 children in Bangladesh which should be taken into consideration to formulate an evidence-based strategy to reduce undernutrition among under-5 children. 

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  • 11.
    Chowdhury, Mohammad Rocky Khan
    et al.
    Monash University, Victoria, Australia.
    Khan, Hafiz TA
    University of West London, UK.
    Rashid, Mamunur
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Public Health and Sport Science, Public Health Science.
    Mondal, Md Nazrul Islam
    University of Rajshahi, Rajshahi, Bangladesh.
    Bornee, Farzana Akhter
    Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University, Dhaka, Bangladesh.
    Billah, Baki
    Monash University, Victoria, Australia.
    Prevalence and correlates of severe under-5 child anthropometric failure measured by the Composite Index of Severe Anthropometric Failure in Bangladesh2022In: Frontiers in Pediatrics , E-ISSN 2296-2360, Vol. 10, article id 978568Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Although Bangladesh has made noticeable progress in reducing the prevalence of stunting, wasting, and being underweight among under-5 children, it has not been very successful in reducing overall severe anthropometric failure (SAF) among them. Therefore, the study aims to identify the prevalence and risk factors of SAF measured by the Composite Index of Severe Anthropometric Failure (CISAF) among under-5 children in Bangladesh. 

    Methods: Data was drawn from a cross-sectional Bangladesh Demographic Health Survey (BDHS) conducted in 2017-18. A bivariate analysis (Chi-square test) and logistic regression analysis were used to estimate the unadjusted and age and sex adjusted prevalence of SAF. Odds ratio (OR) and confidence interval (CI) were assessed using logistic regression analysis to identify the various risk factor of SAF. 

    Results: The overall adjusted prevalence of under-5 child SAF was 11.3% (95% CI: 10.6 - 12.0) and it was highly prevalent among children of uneducated mothers (adjusted, 22%, 95% CI: 17.3 - 26.8). The key factors associated with SAF were children in the age group 24-35 months (OR: 2.43, 95% CI: 1.83 – 3.23), children born with low birth weight (OR: 3.14, 95% CI: 2.24 – 4.97), children of underweight mothers (OR: 1.82, 95% CI: 1.44 – 2.29), children of parents with no formal education (OR: 2.28, 95% CI: 1.56 – 3.31) and children from lower socio-economic status (OR: 2.25, 95% CI: 1.55 – 3.26). 

    Conclusion: Prioritizing and ensuring context-specific interventions addressing individual, community, public policy, and environment level risk factors from policy level to implementation to reduce structural and intermediary determinants of under-5 SAF. 

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  • 12.
    Chowdhury, Mohammad Rocky Khan
    et al.
    Monash University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Rahman, Md Shafiur
    Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Hamamatsu, Japan.
    Billah, Baki
    Monash University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Rashid, Mamunur
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Public Health and Sport Science, Public Health Science.
    Almroth, Melody
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kader, Manzur
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Prevalence and factors associated with severe undernutrition among under-5 children in Bangladesh, Pakistan, and Nepal: a comparative study using multilevel analysis2023In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 13, no 1, article id 10183Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite economic growth and poverty reduction, under-5 child undernutrition is still rampant in South Asian countries. This study explored the prevalence and risk factors of severe undernutrition among under-5 children in Bangladesh, Pakistan, and Nepal for comparison using the Composite Index of Severe Anthropometric Failure. We utilised information on under-5 children from recent Demographic Health Surveys. We used multilevel logistic regression models for data analysis. The prevalence of severe undernutrition among under-5 children was around 11.5%, 19.8%, and 12.6% in Bangladesh, Pakistan, and Nepal, respectively. Children from the lowest socioeconomic quintile, and children born with low birth weight were key factors associated with severe undernutrition in these countries. The factors, parental education, maternal nutritional status, antenatal and postnatal care, and birth order were not homogeneous in explaining the determinants of child severe undernutrition across the countries. Our results suggest that the poorest households, and low birth weight of children have significant effects on severe undernutrition among under-5 children in these countries, which should be considered to formulate an evidence-based strategy to reduce severe undernutrition in South Asia.

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  • 13.
    Dadich, Ann
    et al.
    Western Sydney University, Parramatta, NSW, Australia.
    Buttigieg, Sandra
    University of Malta, Msida, Malta.
    Macassa, Gloria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Public Health and Sport Science, Public Health Science.
    West, Thomas
    University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
    Editorial: Health service management and leadership: COVID-style2023In: Frontiers In Public Health, ISSN 2296-2565, Vol. 11, article id 1141055Article in journal (Other academic)
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  • 14.
    de Rijke, Chris
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Computer and Geospatial Sciences, Geospatial Sciences.
    Macassa, Gloria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Public Health and Sport Science, Public Health Science.
    Sandberg, Mats
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building Engineering, Energy Systems and Sustainability Science, Energy Systems and Building Technology.
    Jiang, Bin
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Computer and Geospatial Sciences, Geospatial Sciences.
    Living Structure as an Empirical Measurement of City Morphology2020In: ISPRS International Journal of Geo-Information, ISSN 2220-9964, Vol. 9, no 11, article id 677Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Human actions and interactions are shaped in part by our direct environment. The studies of Christopher Alexander show that objects and structures can inhibit natural properties and characteristics; this is measured in living structure. He also found that we have better connection and feeling with more natural structures, as they more closely resemble ourselves. These theories are applied in this study to analyze and compare the urban morphology within different cities. The main aim of the study is to measure the living structure in cities. By identifying the living structure within cities, comparisons can be made between different types of cities, artificial and historical, and an estimation of what kind of effect this has on our wellbeing can be made. To do this, natural cities and natural streets are identified following a bottom-up data-driven methodology based on the underlying structures present in OpenStreetMap (OSM) road data. The naturally defined city edges (natural cities) based on intersection density and naturally occurring connected roads (natural streets) based on good continuity between road segments in the road data are extracted and then analyzed together. Thereafter, historical cities are compared with artificial cities to investigate the differences in living structure; it is found that historical cities generally consist of far more living structure than artificial cities. This research finds that the current usage of concrete, steel, and glass combined with very fast development speeds is detrimental to the living structure within cities. Newer city developments should be performed in symbiosis with older city structures as a whole, and the structure of the development should inhibit scaling as well as the buildings themselves.

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  • 15.
    Hiswåls, Anne-Sofie
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Public Health and Sport Science, Public Health Science.
    Wulff Hamrin, Cornelia
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Public Health and Sport Science, Public Health Science.
    Vidman, Åsa
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Criminology, Social Work.
    Macassa, Gloria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Public Health and Sport Science, Public Health Science.
    Corporate social responsibility and external stakeholders’ health and wellbeing: A viewpoint2020In: Journal of Public Health Research, ISSN 2279-9028, E-ISSN 2279-9036, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 27-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years there has been increased interest in the roleplayed by business corporate social responsibility (CSR) strategiesin promoting the health and wellbeing of internal and externalstakeholders. However, the sparse public health research to datehas mainly focused on the health and wellbeing of internal stakeholders.This viewpoint article aims to ignite discussion of howCSR strategies need to also target external stakeholders beyondthe workplace. Businesses have an opportunity to help address themost important societal challenges, especially the social determinantsof health which are the root causes of inequities in health.However, while advancing a new agenda for promoting externalstakeholders’ health, businesses need to take into account potentialchallenges that might arise from ethical conflicts when trying tobalance their CSR initiatives against their business operations.

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  • 16.
    Islam, Md. Shariful
    et al.
    Department of Public Health, First Capital University of Bangladesh, Chuadanga 7200, Bangladesh.
    Chowdhury, Mohammad Rocky Khan
    Department of Public Health, First Capital University of Bangladesh, Chuadanga 7200, Bangladesh;Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Monash University, Melbourne 3004, Australia.
    Bornee, Farzana Akhter
    Department of Pediatrics, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University, Dhaka 1000, Bangladesh.
    Chowdhury, Hasina Akhter
    Department of Public Health, First Capital University of Bangladesh, Chuadanga 7200, Bangladesh.
    Billah, Baki
    Department of Public Health, First Capital University of Bangladesh, Chuadanga 7200, Bangladesh.
    Kader, Manzur
    Department of Medicine, Clinical Epidemiology Division, Karolinska Institutet, Solna, 17177 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rashid, Mamunur
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Public Health and Sport Science, Public Health Science.
    Prevalence and Determinants of Diarrhea, Fever, and Coexistence of Diarrhea and Fever in Children Under-Five in Bangladesh2023In: Children, E-ISSN 2227-9067, Vol. 10, no 11, article id 1829Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Diarrhea and fever are prevalent childhood illnesses with potentially severe consequences, especially when they co-occur. This study investigates the prevalence and determinants of diarrhea, fever, and their coexistence among children under-five in Bangladesh. Data from the 2017–2018 Bangladesh Demography and Health Survey (BDHS) were analyzed using multivariable stepwise logistic regression with backward selection. This study found that 5.0% for diarrhea, 34.0% for fever, and 3.0% for the coexistence of both illnesses. Common factors associated with childhood diarrhea and fever included the child’s age (12–23 months), and the mother’s education. Diarrhea was associated with households with improved water sources and children in the Barisal division, while fever was linked to underweight children and those from more affluent backgrounds. The coexistence of both was significantly linked to underweight children, higher birth orders, and children from the Rajshahi division. Notably, child illnesses were associated with parental education, higher socio-economic status, and access to improved drinking water sources. Diarrhea affects one in 20 children, fever affects one in three, and the coexistence of both conditions affects one in 35 children in Bangladesh. The findings need further research and policy reviews to develop effective interventions and improve child health in Bangladesh.

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  • 17.
    Johansson, Malin
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Public Health and Sport Science, Sports Science.
    Hiswåls, Anne-Sofie
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Public Health and Sport Science, Public Health Science.
    Svennberg, Lena
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Public Health and Sport Science, Sports Science.
    Macassa, Gloria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Public Health and Sport Science, Public Health Science.
    What do we know about corporate social responsibility and stakeholders physical activity? A public health perspective2022In: Journal of Public Health Research, ISSN 2279-9028, E-ISSN 2279-9036, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the past decade and in the context of sustainable development, business organizations have been expected to partner with governments and others to address societal problems, including those pertinent to population health. Accordingly, through their corporate social responsibility (CSR) strategies and policies, companies should collaborate in health promotion efforts to modify the effects of the health determinants (including those concerning behavior change) affecting internal and external stakeholders. Although CSR strategies and policies are linked to stakeholder health and wellbeing (e.g. employee satisfaction), little is known of how these strategies affect physical activity. Thus, this perspective paper aims to contribute to the discussion of the topic by investigating what scientific evidence exists regarding the relationship between CSR and physical activity. So far there are indications that some business are implementing CSR activities targeting internal (e.g. employees) and external (e.g. consumers) stakeholders, especially in developed countries. Furthermore, among external stakeholders, CSR activities with a physical activity component targeted children, youth, the disabled, the under-privileged, and the elderly. However, there is still very little empirical evidence available using appropriate quantitative and qualitative designs. Public health and health science researchers in general should strive to advance our understanding of how CSR affects population health behavior, paving the way to develop frameworks for resilient, ethical, and sustainable health promotion.

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  • 18.
    Jónsdóttir, Anna Elisabet Skovsgaard
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Public Health and Sport Science, Public Health Science.
    Gröna miljöers användning på demensboenden2022Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between the use of green environments in dementia nursing-homes depending on the staff's educational level, the geographical position of nursing-homes and the time the elderly spend in green environments. This was a cross-sectional survey study with a total of 49 assistant nurses working in retirement homes for elderly with dementia in Gävleborg county, Sweden. The survey included a series of questions derived from four hypotheses: 

    There was predicted to be a difference in

    1.     the nursing assistants use of green spaces for the health of residents depending on the nursing homes geographical position,

    2.     the use of green spaces for the health of residents depending on the educational level of nursing assistants,

    3.     the time the elderly residents spend in the green spaces depending on the nursing homes geographical position, and

    4.     the time the elderly residents spend in the green spaces depending on the educational level of nursing assistants.

    The data was analysed using the analysis program IBM SPSS Statistics, version 27. The study findings suggests that there might be a relationship between nursing assistants use of green spaces to promote the health of elderly and geographical position of the nursing home. Further research is needed to determine which factors are at play regarding nursing assistants’ use of green spaces for residents of nursing homes.

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  • 19.
    Kader, Manzur
    et al.
    KTH.
    Hossain, Md. Afzal
    Department of Physiotherapy, Zainul Haque Sikder Women’s Medical College and Hospital, Dhaka, Bangladesh.
    Reddy, Vijayendar
    Department of Neurosurgery, Zainul Haque Sikder Women’s Medical College and Hospital, Dhaka, Bangladesh.
    Perera, Nirmala K. Panagodage
    Nufeld Department of Orthopaedics, Rheumatology, and Musculoskeletal Sciences, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK; Linköping University.
    Rashid, Mamunur
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Public Health and Sport Science, Public Health Science.
    Effects of short-term breathing exercises on respiratory recovery in patients with COVID-19: a quasi-experimental study2022In: BMC Sports Science, Medicine and Rehabilitation, E-ISSN 2052-1847 , Vol. 14, no 1, article id 60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a highly infectious respiratory tract disease. The most common clinical manifestation of severe COVID-19 is acute respiratory failure. Respiratory rehabilitation can be a crucial part of treatment, but data lack for patients with COVID-19. This study investigates the effects of short-term respiratory rehabilitation (i.e., breathing exercises) on respiratory recovery among non-ICU hospitalized patients with COVID-19.

    Methods: 

    This was a quasi-experimental, pre-and post-test study. The study recruited 173 patients hospitalized with moderate to severe COVID-19. All the patients received standardized care for COVID-19, and 94 patients in the intervention group also received the intervention of breathing exercises, which included breathing control, followed by diaphragmatic breathing, deep breathing, or thoracic expansion exercise, and huffing (forced expiratory technique) and coughing. Data on the mean values of peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2) need for oxygen therapy (liter/min), respiratory rate (breaths/minute), and heart rate (beats/minute) were collected at baseline, 4 days, and 7 days after the baseline assessment. Analysis of variance on repeated measures was applied to compare the mean value of outcome measures of all the time points.

    Results: 

    The mean (±SD) age of the intervention (69.6% men) and control group (62.1% men) were 50.1 (10.5) and 51.5 (10.4) years, respectively. At 4-day of follow-up, SpO2 (96.6% ±1.9 vs. 90.7% ±1.8, P<0.001), need for oxygen therapy (0.8 ±2.6 vs. 2.3 ±2.9, P<0.001), respiratory rate (20.5 ±2.3 vs. 22.3 ±2.5, P<0.001), and heart rate (81.2 ±9.5 vs. 89.2 ±8.9, P<0.001) improved in the intervention group compared to the control group. At 7-day follow-up, differences remained significant concerning the oxygen saturation and the need for oxygen therapy (P < 0.001) between the groups.

    Conclusions:

    Our results indicate that breathing exercise, even for a short period, effectively improves specific respiratory parameters in moderate to severe COVID-19 patients. As a non-invasive and cost-effective respiratory rehabilitation intervention, breathing exercise can be a valuable tool for a health care system overwhelmed by the COVID-19 pandemic. These results should be considered preliminary until they are replicated in larger samples in different settings. 

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  • 20.
    Larsson, Ruzanna
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Public Health and Sport Science, Public Health Science.
    Från utanförskap till innanförskap: Om äldres upplevda hälsa i det digitala samhället2022Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Syfte: Den här studiens syfte var att undersöka den upplevda hälsan bland personer i åldern 65+ som lever i digitalt utanförskap. Det sker genom informanter, som har frekvent kontakt med dessa individer, om deras uppfattning av ämnet. Metod: En kvalitativ studie genomfördes genom datainsamling från enskilda intervjuer med fyra informanter som har frekvent kontakt med äldre personer som lever i digitalt utanförskap. Design som användes var empirisk och deskriptiv. Resultat: Resultatet visade att digitalt utanförskap hos äldre individer orsakas av både inre och yttre hinder, vilket syftar till individuella och samhälleliga faktorer. Dessa faktorer inkluderade attityder och känslor kring digital teknik och digitalisering. Motivation som drivkraft nämndes som en betydande faktor för att ingå i digitalt innanförskap. Det framkom under intervjuerna att majoriteten av informanterna mestadels saknade insikt i vilken hälsomässig påverkan digitalt utanförskap hade på de äldre de varit i kontakt med. Slutsats: Digital inkludering av äldre individer är betydande för att uppnå jämlika förutsättningar för hälsa och delaktighet i samhället. Resultatet visade att både inre och yttre hinder, individuella och samhälleliga faktorer, ligger till grund för digitalt utanförskap hos äldre individer

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  • 21.
    Lee, Sook Young
    et al.
    Yonsei University, Korea.
    Hung, Lillian
    University of British Columbia.
    Chaudhury, Habib
    Simon Fraser University, British Columbia, Canada.
    Morelli, Agneta
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Public Health and Sport Science, Public Health Science.
    Staff perspectives on the role of physical environment in long-term care facilities on dementia care in Canada and Sweden2021In: Dementia, ISSN 1471-3012, E-ISSN 1741-2684, Vol. 20, no 7, p. 2558-2572Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: This study aimed to explore staff perspectives of the physical environment in supporting their care practices for residents living with dementia in Canadian and Swedish long-term care facilities.; Design: An exploratory, descriptive, qualitative research design based on focus groups was used.; Participants: A total of 24 staff members who worked closely with the residents such as nurses or care aides participated in the focus group interviews from four facilities, two in Sweden and two in Canada.; Measurements: Focus group interview was held at each selected care facility once and a total of four times were conducted. Broad questions were asked about the effect of physical environment on care practice, job satisfaction, and interaction with residents. Data were analyzed by thematic analysis.; Findings: This study identified three environmental themes that have substantial effect on the social interaction and care practice: (i) design ambience enables and limits social and care interaction, (ii) space arrangements facilitate and hinder the effectiveness of care delivery, and (iii) sensory stimuli have direct impact on residents. The findings demonstrate that well-designed environment qualities such as homelike ambience, an open layout, and stimulating courtyard positively stimulate the emotion of staff as well as residents, which also leads to build trust and relationship and to increase job satisfaction. The study found that the appropriate level of sound or familiar music for residents with dementia is a positive stimulus. When the staff felt comfortable and supported by good care unit's ambience, they can be motivated to care for their residents, leading to better care practices. The study also found that the closed floor plan in an institutional setting could increase staff fatigue by obstructing the view of residents' behaviors and movement and by increasing walking loads.; Conclusions: This study highlights the complexities of how care was organized and influenced by the physical environment of the setting. The variations in the physical environmental characteristics and quality of care suggest the value of comparative research in identifying and exploring the possible causes and consequences. Future development in long-term care facilities requires a better understanding of staff experiences and staff involvement in the physical design of care settings.

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  • 22.
    Lekselius, Victor
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Public Health and Sport Science, Public Health Science.
    Så får vi fler fysiskt aktiva barn och unga på fritiden: Skola och idrottsföreningar i samverkan2023Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to investigate the perceived factors influencing the possibilities of engaging more children and youth in organized physical activity during their leisure time within the current IOP project. The studys method used semi-structured interviews for data collection. Conventional content analysis was used for data analysis. The results indicate that resources, organizationalstructure and activites, and the interest of children and youth have the greatest impact on their level of engagement in physical activity. Girls, children from different ethnic backgrounds, and those lacking adult role models were considered more challenging to reach. The informants unanimously emphasized the importance of increased collaboration. The conclusion drawn is that access to economic resources, visible organizations, and children and youth's own interest are crucial in promoting their physical activity. The lack of these factors was found to be a hindrance. Challenges were identified in reaching girls, children from different ethnic backgrounds, and those lacking adult role models. The informants emphasized the significance of increased collaboration for promoting physical activity among children and youth.

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  • 23.
    Lundberg, Andreas
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Public Health and Sport Science, Public Health Science.
    Distansundervisnings och högskoleelevers livskvalitet under Covid-19 pandemin: En kvantitativ tvärsnittsstudie2022Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The COVID-19 pandemic and its restrictions had an impact on regular education, which could have an effect on university/college students’ mental health and quality of life.  The aim of this study is to identify and determine whether stress and anxiety due to distance education affected students' quality of life during the COVID-19 pandemic. Method: A cross-sectional study was performed with a sample of 42 students from a university in central Sweden. Bivariate analysis was performed to see the difference between groups, and logistic regression was used to examine the association of anxiety and stress due to distance education with students’ quality of life. Results: The results of this study showed a connection between students who experience anxiety or stress and poor quality of life. Summary: The findings highlight the need for systematic preventive measures by universities and authorities in the hope of preventing a downward trend in the quality of life.

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    Examensarbete
  • 24. Lundbäck, Maja
    et al.
    Rashid, Mamunur
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Public Health and Sport Science, Public Health Science.
    Oerfaren personlig tränare (PT) ökar risken för smärta2023In: Svenska DagbladetArticle, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 25.
    Macassa, Gloria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Public Health and Sport Science, Public Health Science.
    Can sustainable health behaviour contribute to ensure healthy lives and wellbeing for all at all ages (SDG 3)?: A viewpoint2021In: Journal of Public Health Research, ISSN 2279-9028, E-ISSN 2279-9036, Vol. 10, no 3, article id 2051Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sustainable health behaviours and, specifically, eating a sustainable diet and engaging in regular physical activity are health-promoting behaviours that can simultaneously contribute to reduction of greenhouse gases which are known to contribute to climate change. Good health usually facilitates societal development, and development often promotes improved health. However, while good health may be a prerequisite for societal development, some behavioural determinants of health, such as attitudes towards the environment, and people's lifestyles and consumption patterns, can impede the sustainability of the development process in the longer term. This perspective paper argues that there is a need to rethink 21st century health promotion practices by pairing sustainability literacy with health promotion for changing dietary and physical activity behaviour patterns to improve population health and contribute to the achievement of Sustainable Development Goal 3 (to ensure healthy lives and promote wellbeing for all at all ages).

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  • 26.
    Macassa, Gloria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Public Health and Sport Science, Public Health Science.
    Can the interconnection between public health and social work help address current and future population health challenges? A public health viewpoint2022In: Journal of Public Health Research, ISSN 2279-9028, E-ISSN 2279-9036, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 1-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The debate over the function and role of public health in all societies (high, middle, and low-income) still continues today. Public health needs to interact with the social and translational sciences to achieve the best possible scientific evidence and practice aimed at development of effective policies for individual and population health practices. As a field, public health is most suited for development of transdisciplinary education, research and practice—improving population health would entail embedding with a variety of other disciplines including social work. Public health and social work in many ways share the same beginnings as well as their role in advocacy for social and health equity. For this reason, the transdisciplinary profession of public health social work is well placed to develop and build the inter-professional and cross-sectoral collaboration that is needed to address the many health challenges of the 21st century, based on theories, knowledge and interventions from both public health and social work. Furthermore, the profession can help in attempting to close the health inequalities gap, address social isolation, family violence and homelessness, advance long and productive lives, create social responses to the changing environment, reduce economic inequality, harness technology for social good, and work toward the achievement of justice and equality of opportunity.

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  • 27.
    Macassa, Gloria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Public Health and Sport Science, Public Health Science.
    Does Structural Violence by Institutions Enable Revictimization and Lead to Poorer Health Outcomes?—A Public Health Viewpoint2023In: Annals of Global Health, ISSN 2214-9996, Vol. 89, no 1, article id 58Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although structural violence is known to interact with and reinforce direct violence in the form of interpersonal violence (e.g., intimate partner violence), little debate takes place in public health on how it can lead to revictimization, leading to even poorer health outcomes (including psychological ill health). This viewpoint aims to discuss this issue using examples from empirical studies to elucidate how structural violence (perpetrated through institutions) contributes to revictimization among people who are already suffering direct violence. Public health professionals (and researchers) need to make efforts to theorize and measure structural violence to aid efforts toward the study of how it intersects with interpersonal violence to influence health outcomes. This will ultimately contribute to better prevention and intervention efforts to curb interpersonal violence and improve population health and well-being. In addition, there is a need to include structural violence in the academic curriculum when training future generations of public health professionals. Increased education on structural violence will bring about an awareness of the grave consequences of the potential additional harm that institutions could inflict on the lives of people they should be protecting or care for.

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  • 28.
    Macassa, Gloria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Public Health and Sport Science, Public Health Science.
    Integrated corporate social responsibility and human resources management for stakeholders health promotion2019In: South Eastern European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 2197-5248, Vol. 12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the past decade, there has been an argument for the inclusion of corporate social responsibility (CSR) in models and business strategies. However, the conversion of CSR strategy into actual managerial practices and outcome values remains an issue of ongoing debate as well an important challenge for business organizations. Furthermore, still is very little discussion on how business will influence stakeholder’s health promotion and surrounding environment as means to help address society’s most pressing challenges.

    This paper discusses the potential of public health literacy in advancing stakeholders’ health promotion beyond the workplace. The discussion argues that integrating corporate social responsibility (CSR) and human resources management (HRM) is an effective strategy to achieve social sustainability in organizations in which stakeholders’ health and well-being are important components.

    This short report describes an integrated CSR-HRM and describes how it can facilitate public health literacy. In the era of sustainable development, there is a need to discuss how business organizations can strategize to enhance internal and external stakeholders’ health and well-being.

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  • 29.
    Macassa, Gloria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Public Health and Sport Science, Public Health Science.
    Neighbourhood Social Sustainability, Urban Renewal and Health Inequalities: A Public Health Viewpoint2022In: International Journal of Urban Planning and Smart Cities, ISSN 2644-1659, Vol. 3, no 1, article id 52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Social sustainability has been less studied than its counterparts, economic and environmental sustainability. Furthermore, social sustainability has not been often discussed within the discipline of public health and let alone, there has been very little discussion about the potential impact of neighbourhood social sustainability on health related outcomes as well as health inequities. This perspective paper attempts to fill that gap by igniting a discussion on how neighbourhood social sustainability can affect health equity in the context of health promotion and sustainable development. Neighbourhood social sustainability through urban renewal can contribute to the reduction of inequalities in health only if the process takes into account the health and wellbeing of the most disadvantaged groups. In addition, it is important that public health researchers become part of the discussions on how neighbourhood social sustainability can contribute to population health equity.

  • 30.
    Macassa, Gloria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Public Health and Sport Science, Public Health Science.
    Public Perceptions of Sustainable Physical Activity and Active Transportation: A Pilot Qualitative Study in Gävle and Maputo2023In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 15, no 21, article id 15354Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sustainable physical activity and active transportation are important for achieving sustainable societies as well as for achieving the sustainable development goal of health and wellbeing for all. The main objective of this pilot study was to investigate the general public’s perceptions of sustainable physical activity and active transportation in the cities of Gävle (Sweden) and Maputo (Mozambique). Twelve semi-structured asynchronous e-mail interviews were subjected to content analysis. Findings indicated that participants knew what physical activity is and that they related it to general health and wellbeing. However, the majority were not familiar with the meaning of “sustainable physical activity” or “active transportation.” Furthermore, they did not know about the relationship between sustainable development and physical activity. The few participants who knew about active transportation said that it could contribute to reducing greenhouse gases. They mentioned barriers to active transportation in their respective cities, however, ranging from laziness (in the case of Gävle) to cultural norms and associations such as linking the use of active transportation to lacking the means to buy a motor vehicle (in Maputo). There is a need to integrate sustainability literacy with the already existing health and public health literacies to provide this knowledge to the general population. To this end, rather than creating new educational programmes for the public, the existing materials can be adjusted to include aspects of sustainability and sustainable health behaviours and lifestyles.

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  • 31.
    Macassa, Gloria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Public Health and Sport Science, Public Health Science.
    Responsible leadership styles and promotion of stakeholders health2019In: South Eastern European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 2197-5248, Vol. 11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this short report is to stimulate a conversation on the potential role to be played by responsible leadership in promoting the health and well-being of stakeholders (employees and society at large).

    The report first describes responsible leadership styles and then briefly discusses the potential connection with health promotion within the lens of the wider determinants of health and intersectorial collaboration.

    Integrative responsible leadership and health promotion share a common vision: to alter the economic, environmental, and social contexts in which decisions relating to health and well-being are made, thus affecting health equity.

  • 32.
    Macassa, Gloria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Public Health and Sport Science, Public Health Science.
    Social Enterprise, Population Health and Sustainable Development Goal 3: A Public Health Viewpoint2021In: Annals of Global Health, E-ISSN 2214-9996, Vol. 87, no 1, article id e07210Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although there is no consensus on the definition of “social enterprises (SEs),” various scholars have agreed that SEs are “sustainable ventures that combine business principles with a passion for social impact.” Using a public health lens, this viewpoint paper attempts to discuss the potential role SEs might play in the achievement of sustainable population health and Sustainable Development Goal 3 (SDG 3): “Health for all at all ages.” Through their impact on social determinants of health (the conditions in which people are born, grow, work, and age), SEs have a potential to contribute to SDGs, specifically SDG 3. They can do so by acting on and modifying the economic, social and environmental challenges communities face, to help promote health and wellbeing and improve the quality of life among children, adolescents, working adults and elderly across countries, societies and generations. Social enterprises present an opportunity to engage business as partners in health promotion – which is yet to materialize in all societies globally.

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  • 33.
    Macassa, Gloria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Public Health and Sport Science, Public Health Science.
    The Impact of the Inter-Section Smart Specialization, Social Enterprise, and Innovation on Health Promotion and Equity2022In: International Journal of Sustainable Entrepreneurship and Corporate Social Responsibility, ISSN 2379-7398, Vol. 7, no 1, article id 66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Smart specialization has been a central strategy for regional smart specializations (RS3s) across the European Union (EU), as a way to stimulate innovative development of the EU regions. The strategy aims to stimulate development in areas or regions that do not necessarily have the highest technological advancement but that have specialized and have had a comparative advantage to implement innovations based on research. This paper aims to initiate a discussion on the potential use of S3 as a platform for social entrepreneurship and innovation with the goal to promote and improve population health through the lens of health equity. Social entrepreneurship and innovation embedded within smart specialization presents a unique opportunity for health promotion and health equity in an agenda for regional development. However, empirical research is needed to develop new models for investigating the intersections between S3, SE and SI, and health promotion, health equity and sustainable development goal 3 (ensure healthy lives at all ages).

  • 34.
    Macassa, Gloria
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Public Health and Sport Science, Public Health Science. Universidade do Porto, Portugal.
    Francisco, Jose da Cruz
    Eduardo Mondlane University, Mozambique.
    Militao, Elias
    Eduardo Mondlane University, Mozambique.
    Soares, Joaquim
    Mittuniversitetet; Universidade Europeia, Portugal.
    A Descriptive Systematic Review of Food Insecurity and Intimate Partner Violence in Southern Africa2022In: Women, E-ISSN 2673-4184, Vol. 2, no 4, p. 397-407Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Food insecurity and intimate partner violence are important determinants of health and wellbeing in southern Africa. However, very little research has attempted to investigate the association between them even though food insecurity is anticipated to increase in the region, mostly owing to climate change. The objective of this paper was to descriptively review peer reviewed studies that investigated the relationship between food insecurity and intimate partner violence in southern Africa. Literature searches were carried out in Scopus, Web of Science and PubMed databases without any time restriction. A total of five studies that investigated the association between food insecurity and intimate partner violence were identified in South Africa and Swaziland. Of these four studies used a cross-sectional design, and one employed a longitudinal design. Samples varied from 406 to 2479 individuals. No empirical studies were found for the remaining southern African countries of Angola, Botswana, Malawi, Namibia, Zambia, Zimbabwe, Lesotho, and Mozambique. Moreover, the reported findings indicated that there was an association between food insecurity and interpersonal violence (i.e., physical, psychological, and emotional) in the sub-region regardless the fact that the five studies used diverse measurements of both food insecurity and intimate partner violence.

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    Macassa FI and IPV
  • 35.
    Macassa, Gloria
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Public Health and Sport Science, Public Health Science.
    Gianpaolo, Tomaselli
    University of Malta.
    Soares, Joaquim
    Mid-Sweden University.
    Responsible leadership behaviour as determinant of stakeholders health and well-being: A review and conceptual framework2019In: International Journal of Responsible Leadership and Ethical Decision-Making, ISSN 2577-4840, Vol. 1, no 2, p. 44-62, article id 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent corporate scandals have prompted discussion of the role of business in society. Business leaders are increasingly held accountable for their actions and non-actions in relation to all stakeholders, both internal and external. The emerging challenges faced by business organizations today include economic, social, and environmental demands; globalization; rapid population growth; natural resources exploitation; extreme poverty and debt; global migration; unprecedented inequality; global migration; geopolitical and ecological crises; climate change and other environmental issues; competitive pressure; health issues; new information and communication technologies; and sustainable lifestyles. Responsible leadership represents a new type of leadership, which is better positioned to address these challenges through stakeholder consideration and in the context of sustainable development. Building on existing literature, the aim of this article is to present a conceptual framework of responsible leadership as a potential determinant of stakeholders' health and well-being.

  • 36.
    Macassa, Gloria
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Public Health and Sport Science, Public Health Science. Universidade do Porto.
    McGrath, Cormac
    Stockholms universitet; Karolinska institutet.
    Rashid, Mamunur
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Public Health and Sport Science, Public Health Science.
    Soares, Joaquim
    Mid-Sweden University.
    Structural violence and health-related outcomes in Europe: a descriptive systematic review2021In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 18, no 13, article id 6998Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, there has been a revival of the term “structural violence (SV)” which was coined by Johan Galtung in the 1960s in the context of Peace Studies. “Structural violence” refers to social structures—economic, legal, political, religious, and cultural—that prevent individuals, groups and societies from reaching their full potential. In the European context, very few studies have investigated health and well-being using an SV perspective. Therefore, this paper sought to systematically and descriptively review studies that used an SV framework to examine health-related outcomes across European countries. The review included two studies each from Spain and France, one each from the UK, Ukraine and Russia, and another study including the three countries Sweden, Portugal and Germany. With the exception of one mixed-method study, the studies used a qualitative design. Furthermore, the eight studies in the review used different conceptualizations of SV, which indicates the complexity of using SV as a concept in public health in the European context. Future research that attempts to identify and standardize measures of SV is needed; the knowledge gained is hoped to inform appropriate interventions aiming to reduce the effects of SV on population health. 

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  • 37.
    Macassa, Gloria
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Public Health and Sport Science, Public Health Science. Universidade do Porto, Portugal.
    McGrath, Cormac
    Stockholms universitet.
    Roy, Michael J.
    Glasgow Caledonian University, Glasgow, UK.
    Stål, Frida
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building Engineering, Energy Systems and Sustainability Science, Environmental Science.
    Hiswåls, Anne-Sofie
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Public Health and Sport Science, Public Health Science.
    Rashid, Mamunur
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Public Health and Sport Science, Public Health Science.
    Karlsson, Ulf
    Olsson, Rooney
    Silva, Jose Pedro
    Universidade do Porto, Portugal.
    Vinberg, Stig
    Mittuniversitetet.
    Marttila, Anneli
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Public Health and Sport Science, Public Health Science.
    Perceptions of Health and Wellbeing Among Employees in a Work Integration Social Enterprise in Sweden2023In: Annals of Global Health, E-ISSN 2214-9996, Vol. 89, no 1, article id 31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Work Integration Social Enterprises (WISEs) constitute an important vehiclefor providing employment opportunities for disadvantaged groups.Objective: The goal of this qualitative case study is to explore perceptions of health andwellbeing among employees working in a WISE located in the Gävleborg region, in eastcentral Sweden.Methods: Data were gathered using 16 in-depth, semi-structured interviews with thesocial enterprise employees.Results: Findings were categorized into three main categories: the importance of financialindependence and societal benefits; team spirit and a sense of belonging; and improvedquality of life and wellbeing.Conclusion: The participants perceived that working in the WISE gave them a feeling offreedom and increased their self-esteem because of the possibility to earn an income.Also, they were satisfied with their job (e.g., with regard to work quality and flexibility)and believed that their work contributed to society. Moreover, through working in a WISE,the participants felt a sense of belonging and togetherness through interaction with coworkersand managers, and an improved quality of life for themselves and their families.

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  • 38.
    Macassa, Gloria
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Public Health and Sport Science, Public Health Science.
    McGrath, Cormac
    Centre for the Advancement of University Teaching, Stockholm University.
    Soares, Joaquim
    Mid-Sweden University, European University Lisbon.
    Violence as an object of teaching, research, and prevention practices, at the nexus between public health, social work, criminology, and psychology2023Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Violence is a growing social and public health problem affecting all societies in low-middle- and high-income settings. However, teaching, research and prevention practices are often approached within single disciplines. Therefore, this perspective paper discusses an approach where violence can be seen as an object of teaching, research, and prevention practices, at the nexus of four disciplines, public health, social work, criminology, and psychology respectively.

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  • 39.
    Macassa, Gloria
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Public Health and Sport Science, Public Health Science. Universidade do Porto.
    McGrath, Cormac
    Stockholms universitet; Karolinska institutet.
    Tomaselli, Gianpaolo
    University of Malta.
    Buttigieg, Sandra
    University of Malta; University of Birmingham.
    Corporate social responsibility and internal stakeholders health and well-being in Europe: a systematic descriptive review2021In: Health Promotion International, ISSN 0957-4824, E-ISSN 1460-2245, Vol. 36, no 3, p. 866-883Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Corporate social responsibility (CSR) can contribute to the triple bottom line of economic, social and environmental performance in organizations. However, the relationship between CSR, employee health and well-being has not been frequently assessed despite an increased awareness that this relationship can contribute to sustainable workplaces. To identify studies addressing the relationship between CSR and employee health and well-being within the EuCIropean context, we conducted a systematic literature search using Web of Science and Medline. Of the 60 articles screened for inclusion, 16 were retained. The results suggest that the majority (n = 14) of the identified studies aimed to understand the impact of CSR strategies on employees’ job satisfaction. None of the studies investigated the relationship between internal CSR and physical health. There was no clarity in the measurement of either internal CSR or the extent to which it affected employee outcomes. There is a need for consensus on measurement of internal CSR and of the health and well-being-related outcomes. Public health and occupational health researchers should be part of the discussion on the potential role of CSR in physical and psychological health outcomes beyond job satisfaction.

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  • 40.
    Macassa, Gloria
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Public Health and Sport Science, Public Health Science. EPI Unit—Instituto de Saúde Pública, Universidade do Porto, Portugal; Laboratório para a Investigação Integrativa e Translacional em Saúde Populacional (ITR), Porto, Portugal .
    McGrath, Cormac
    Department of Education, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wijk, Katarina
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Rashid, Mamunur
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Public Health and Sport Science, Public Health Science.
    Hiswåls, Anne-Sofie
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Public Health and Sport Science, Public Health Science.
    Soares, Joaquim
    Department of Health Sciences, Mid-Sweden University, Sundsvall, Sweden; Department of Psychology, Universidade Europeia, 1500-210 Lisbon, Portugal.
    The association between fear of crime, educational attainment, and health2023In: Epidemiologia, E-ISSN 2673-3986, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 148-162Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fear of crime is an important public health problem that impacts people’s quality oflife, health, and wellbeing, and causes mental health ailments (e.g., anxiety). This study aimed todetermine whether there was an association between fear of crime, educational attainment, andself-rated health and anxiety among women residing in a county in east-central Sweden. A sample(n = 3002) of women aged 18–84 years surveyed in the Health on Equal Terms survey carried outin 2018 was included in the study. Bivariate and multivariate regression analysis was performedon the relationship between the composite variables fear of crime, educational attainment, andself-rated health and anxiety. Women with primary education or similar who reported fear of crimehad increased odds of poor health (odds ratio (OR) 3.17; 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.40–4.18)compared with women with primary education/similar and no fear of crime (OR 2.90; CI 1.90–3.20).A statistically significant relationship persisted in the multivariate analysis after controlling forother covariates, although the odds were reduced (OR 1.70; CI 1.14–2.53 and 1.73; CI 1.21–2.48,respectively). Similarly, in the bivariate analysis, women who reported fear of crime and whoonly had primary education had statistically significant odds of anxiety (OR 2.12; CI 1.64–2.74); thesignificance was removed, and the odds were reduced (OR 1.30; CI 0.93–1.82) after adjusting fordemographic, socioeconomic, and health-related covariates. Women with only primary educationor similar who reported fear of crime had higher odds of poor health and anxiety compared withthose with university education or similar, with and without fear of crime. Future studies (includinglongitudinal ones) are warranted—on the one hand, to understand possible mechanisms of therelationship between educational attainment and fear of crime and its consequences to health, and onthe other, to explore low-educated women’s own perceptions regarding factors underlining their fearof crime (qualitative studies).

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  • 41.
    Macassa, Gloria
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Public Health and Sport Science, Public Health Science.
    Militao, Elias
    Universidade Eduardo Mondlane.
    Francisco, Jose da Cruz
    Universidade Eduardo Mondlane.
    Is Climate Change Contributing to Food Insecurity and Poor Health Outcomes in Mozambique?2021In: Austin Journal of Public Health and Epidemiology, ISSN 2381-9014, Vol. 8, no 1, article id 1092Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Macassa, Gloria
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Public Health and Sport Science, Public Health Science.
    Rashid, Mamunur
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Public Health and Sport Science, Public Health Science.
    Backlund Rambaree, Brita
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Criminology, Social Work.
    Chowdhury, Ehsanul
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Business and Economic Studies, Business administration.
    Corporate Social Responsibility Reporting for Stakeholders’ Health and Wellbeing in the Food and Beverage Industry: A Case Study of a Multinational Company2022In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 14, no 9, article id 4879Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The concept of corporate social responsibility (CSR) used to be seen as a social obligation of businesses to make decisions and take responsible action in accordance with the goals and values of the society. The concept is today understood as the continuing commitment by businesses to behave ethically and contribute to economic development while improving the quality of life of the workforce and their families as well as the local community and society at large. This study aimed to apply Chowdhury and co-authors’ framework to the Unilever Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) Content Index 2020 to explore the feasibility of the framework as well as identify potential challenges related to its use in the field of public health. Findings show that the framework is suitable for analysing CSR reporting on activities aimed to promote internal and external stakeholders’ health and wellbeing from a public health perspective. A greater number of GRI disclosures reported by Unilever related to external stakeholders’ health and wellbeing than to activities impacting internal stakeholders. Further research should aim at testing the framework in other types of business organizations across other types of industries.

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  • 43.
    Macassa, Gloria
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Public Health and Sport Science, Public Health Science.
    Rashid, Mamunur
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Public Health and Sport Science, Public Health Science.
    Morelli, Agneta
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Public Health and Sport Science, Public Health Science. 202100-2890.
    Social Entrepreneurship, Population Health, and Wellbeing in the Swedish Welfare Context: Opportunities and Challenges2020Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Social entrepreneurs tend to combine revenue goals with serving social needs, and thus operate within both for-profit and non-profit institutional structures. The double bottom line poses social entrepreneurs the challenge of balancing social value creation with market realities. Social entrepreneurship can have an impact on the sustainable development goals, particularly Goal 3 (health for all people at all ages). In Sweden, social entrepreneurship is still a new conception that needs to be understood as a part of the country’s evolving public welfare system. The aim of the present short report is to assess how social entrepreneurs have promoted health and wellbeing in the Swedish context, and to identify future opportunities and challenges. From the population health perspective, and in the context of sustainable development, we see a research opportunity to analyse social enterprise as an upstream health intervention to improve the social determinants of health and wellbeing.

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  • 44.
    Macassa, Gloria
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Public Health and Sport Science, Public Health Science. Universidade do Porto, Portugal.
    Ribeiro, Ana Isabel
    Universidade do Porto, Portugal.
    Marttila, Anneli
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Public Health and Sport Science, Public Health Science.
    Stål, Frida
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building Engineering, Energy Systems and Sustainability Science, Environmental Science.
    Silva, José Pedro
    Universidade do Porto, Portugal.
    Rydback, Michelle
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Business and Economic Studies, Business administration.
    Rashid, Mamunur
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Public Health and Sport Science, Public Health Science.
    Barros, Henrique
    Universidade do Porto, Portugal.
    Public Health Aspects of Climate Change Adaptation in Three Cities: A Qualitative Study2022In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 19, no 16, article id 10292Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Climate change presents an unprecedented public health challenge as it has a great impact on population health outcomes across the global population. The key to addressing these health challenges is adaptation carried out in cities through collaboration between institutions, including public health ones. Through semi-structured interviews (n=16), this study investigated experiences and perceptions of what public health aspects are considered by urban and public health planners and researchers when planning climate change adaptation in the cities of Söderhamn (Sweden), Porto (Portugal) and Navotas (the Philippines). Results of the thematic analysis indicated that participating stakeholders were aware of the main climate risks threatening their cities (rising water levels and flooding, extreme temperatures, and air pollution). In addition, the interviewees talked about collaboration with other sectors, including the public health sector, in implementing climate change adaptation plans. However, the inclusion of the public health sector as a partner in the process was identified in only two cities, Navotas and Porto. Also, the study found that there were few aspects pertaining to public health (water and sanitation, prevention of heat-related and water-borne diseases, and prevention of the consequences associated with heat waves in vulnerable groups such as children and elderly persons) in the latest climate change adaptation plans posted on each city’s website. Moreover, participants pointed to different difficulties: insufficient financial resources, limited intersectoral collaboration for climate change adaptation, and lack of involvement of the public health sector in the adaptation processes, especially in one of the cities, in which climate change adaptation was solely the responsibility of the urban planners. Studies using larger samples of stakeholders in larger cities are needed to better understand why the public health sector is still almost absent in efforts to adapt to climate change.

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    Article
  • 45.
    Macassa, Gloria
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Public Health and Sport Science, Public Health Science. University of Porto.
    Rodrigues, Carina
    University of Porto.
    Barros, Henrique
    University of Porto.
    Marttila, Anneli
    Karolinska Institute.
    Experiences of involuntary job loss and health during the economic crisis in Portugal2021In: Porto Biomedical Journal, ISSN 2444-8664, Vol. 6, no 1, article id e121Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The economic recession that started in 2008 left many unemployed across several European countries. Many studies have analyzed the relationship between job loss, health, and well-being in other contexts. This study aimed to explore experiences of involuntary unemployment during the economic recession and their relationship with health, conceptualized as a state of physical, mental, and social well-being among unemployed individuals.

    Methods: Semistructured qualitative interviews were carried out among a convenience sample of participants who became unemployed during the economic recession. The analysis was conducted to identify patterns and themes.

    Results: Participants (n=22; 8 men and 14 women; 23–51years) experienced feelings of loss of identity, stress, and a sense of powerlessness due to unemployment, as well as a lack of purpose and structure in their daily lives. Six themes were identified: work as the basis for life structure and personal fulfillment; response to unemployment and the importance of its duration; unemployment leading to isolation and loss of a role in society; impact of a change in financial situation on social life and consumption patterns; the physical and psychological health consequences of unemployment; and searching for ways to cope with unemployment and to feel well.

    Conclusions: Losing a job is an adverse experience that impairs an individual’s perception of overall health and well-being. From a public health perspective, the results of this study highlight the need for policymakers’ awareness to help mitigate the potential consequences of involuntary job loss in the short- and long-term.

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  • 46.
    Macassa, Gloria
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Public Health and Sport Science, Public Health Science. Universidade do Porto, Portugal.
    Tomaselli, Gianpaolo
    University of Malta.
    Rethinking developed nations health systems through a social sustainability perspective in the light of the COVID-19 pandemic. A viewpoint2020In: Journal of Public Health Research, ISSN 2279-9028, E-ISSN 2279-9036, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 428-431, article id 1834Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This viewpoint paper argues for the need for more socially sustainable care systems that can better contribute to equitable utilization of health care in a post-pandemic era. Health care systems in developed nations need to rethink their role, particularly with regard to the achievement of Sustainable Development Goal 3 (SDG 3) as well as becoming more sustainable societies. Socially sustainable care systems will recognize that systemic factors and processes (social, economic, environmental, cultural) need to be addressed simultaneously in order to achieve health equity. Moreover, these systems are likely to be of paramount importance for post-COVID-19, because of the potential increase in demand for health care due to forgone health care and the increased burden of chronic diseases as spillover effects related to COVID-19 mitigation interventions.

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  • 47.
    Macassa, Gloria
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Public Health and Sport Science, Public Health Science. Universidade do Porto.
    Tomaselli, Gianpaolo
    University of Malta.
    Socially responsible human resources management and stakeholders’ health promotion: A conceptual paper2020In: South Eastern European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 2197-5248, Vol. 15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The prime objective of this paper is to propose a new conceptual framework for how integrating corporate social responsibility (CSR) and human resources management (HRM) can impact on stakeholders’ health and wellbeing. The proposed framework argues that integrative socially responsible HRM (SR-HRM) policies coupled with public health literacy and integrative responsible leadership can play a significant role in shaping health behaviour change of internal stakeholders, which in turn can spill over to external stakeholders (family and proximate communities).

    From a health promotion and population health perspective, we see human resources (HR) as a leading partner in educating employees on the value of CSR and public health literacy programmes, and also as providing action plans on how to strategically and successfully implement these types of programmes. By helping to develop action plans to analyse CRS and public health literacy activities, HR professionals will be promoting both corporate citizenship and health behaviour change. Both of these are vital for developing a culture of social responsibility (and achieving the triple bottom line (TBL)) and sustainable population health promotion. Henceforth, SR-HRM policies and practices could help business organizations to contribute to the achievement of the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and specifically Goals 3 and 8. This novel framework, which is especially pertinent to public health, has not yet been tested empirically. Hence, future studies are warranted to empirically test the theoretical framework using field data collection.

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  • 48.
    Macassa, Gloria
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Public Health and Sport Science, Public Health Science.
    Tomaselli, Gianpaolo
    University of Malta.
    Soares, Joaquim
    Mid-Sweden University.
    Responsible Leadership Behaviour as a Determinant of Stakeholders' Health and Well-Being: A Review and Conceptual Framework2022In: Research Anthology on Changing Dynamics of Diversity and Safety in the Workforce, IGI Global, 2022, p. 1693-1714Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent corporate scandals have prompted discussion of the role of business in society. Business leaders are increasingly held accountable for their actions and non-actions in relation to all stakeholders, both internal and external. The emerging challenges faced by business organizations today include economic, social, and environmental demands; globalization; rapid population growth; natural resources exploitation; extreme poverty and debt; global migration; unprecedented inequality; global migration; geopolitical and ecological crises; climate change and other environmental issues; competitive pressure; health issues; new information and communication technologies; and sustainable lifestyles. Responsible leadership represents a new type of leadership, which is better positioned to address these challenges through stakeholder consideration and in the context of sustainable development. Building on existing literature, the aim of this article is to present a conceptual framework of responsible leadership as a potential determinant of stakeholders' health and well-being.

    Download (pdf)
    Abstract & introduction
  • 49.
    Macassa, Gloria
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Public Health and Sport Science, Public Health Science. EPIUnit–Instituto de Saude Publica, Universidade do Porto, Rua das Taipas 135, 4050-600 Porto, Portugal;Laboratório para a Investigação Integrativa e Translacional em Saúde Populacional (ITR), Rua das Taipas 135, 4050-600 Porto, Portugal.
    Wijk, Katarina
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research. Centre for Research and Development, Uppsala University, Region Gävleborg, 80187 Gävle, Sweden; Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, 75123 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Rashid, Mamunur
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Public Health and Sport Science, Public Health Science.
    Hiswåls, Anne-Sofie
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Public Health and Sport Science, Public Health Science.
    Daca, Chanvo
    Department of Cooperation, Ministry of Health, Directorate of Planning and Cooperation, Avenida Eduardo Mondlane, Maputo P.O. Box 264, Mozambique.
    Soares, Joaquim
    Department of Health Sciences, Mid-Sweden University, Holmgatan 10, 85170 Sundsvall, Sweden;Department of Psychology, Universidade Europeia, Estrada da Correia nº53, 1500-210 Lisbon, Portugal.
    Interpersonal violence is associated with self-reported stress, anxiety and depression among men in east-central Sweden: Results of a population-based survey2023In: Medicina, ISSN 1010-660X, E-ISSN 1648-9144, Vol. 59, no 2, article id 235Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and Objectives: Interpersonal violence is a social and public health problem globally, and though it is related to poor health outcomes across all genders, most research has been directed towards violence against women. As a result, the health consequences of men’s victimization may be underreported and unaddressed. The purpose of this study was to assess the relationship between interpersonal violence and the psychological health outcomes of self-reported stress, anxiety, and depression among men. Materials and Methods: The study used data from the male sample (n = 2597) of the 2018 Health on Equal Terms Survey conducted in Gävleborg County in East-Central Sweden. Regression analysis was carried out to study the relationship between interpersonal violence and self-reported stress, anxiety, and depression. Results: The bivariate analysis showed that there was a statistically significant association between interpersonal violence and self-reported stress (OR 2.35; CI 1.45–3.81), anxiety (OR 1.54; CI 1.06–2.25), and depression (OR 2.30; CI 1.48–3.57). Controlling for other variables in the multivariate analysis removed the statistically significant relationship and reduced the odds ratios for stress (OR 1.46; CI 0.57–3.74), anxiety (OR 0.86; 0.40–1.84), and depression (OR 1.40; CI 0.67–3.32) respectively. Conclusions: The study found that interpersonal violence among men was associated with stress, anxiety and depression which was largely explained by demographic, socioeconomic, and health/behavior-related factors. The findings suggest the need for longitudinal studies to assess causal links between male victimization and psychological health outcomes at the county level.

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  • 50.
    Mekhail, Kirsi Tiitinen
    et al.
    Karolinska institutet.
    Burström, Bo
    Karolinska institutet.
    Marttila, Anneli
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Public Health and Sport Science, Public Health Science. Karolinska institutet.
    Wångdahl, Josefin
    Karolinska institutet; Uppsala universitet.
    Lindberg, Lene
    Karolinska institutet.
    Changes in Comprehensive Health Literacy Among First-Time Parents Attending Extended Home Visiting in Swedish Multicultural Settings: A Case-Comparison Study2023In: Journal of Pediatric Health Care, ISSN 0891-5245, E-ISSN 1532-656X, Vol. 37, no 4, p. 391-401Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    This study aimed to gain knowledge about the impact of an extended postnatal home visiting program on parents’ comprehensive health literacy (CHL) in multicultural, socioeconomically disadvantaged Swedish settings.

    Method

    This quasi-experimental study adopted a case-control sampling method recruiting first-time parents through two Child Health Care Centers in Stockholm. Participants were interviewed twice through structured questionnaires when their child was aged between less than two months (n = 193) and 15–18 months (n = 151) from October 2017 to August 2020. Analyses used linear regression models and nonparametric tests.

    Results

    A subgroup of parents that needed language interpreters demonstrated statistically significantly improved CHL from premeasures to postmeasures within the intervention group that received an extended home visiting intervention (F = 11.429; p <.001), and when compared with a corresponding subgroup that received merely the ordinary Swedish Child Health Care Centers program (F = 5.025; p = .027).

    Discussion

    Postnatal home visiting interventions may reduce inequity in CHL for parents living in multicultural, socioeconomically disadvantaged settings.

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