hig.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1234567 1 - 50 of 307
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard-cite-them-right
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • sv-SE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • de-DE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Ahola, Marja
    et al.
    Zafar, Afnan
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Relationship Between Frugal and Inclusive Innovation and Digital Employment Solutions (DES): A Review2021In: Human Interaction, Emerging Technologies and Future Applications III / [ed] Ahram T., Taiar R., Langlois K., Choplin A. (eds), Switzerland: Springer, Cham , 2021, 3, p. 398-403Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Inclusive and frugal innovations are the key to managing workforce potential of the underdeveloped regions of South Asia (SA). Digital employment solutions (DES) can help to improve the targeted mobility of labour between developed and underdeveloped regions and countries. This research explores the relationship between frugal and inclusive innovations and DES. This review study analyses 16 articles to investigate this relationship. The study found direct and indirect relationships among frugal and inclusive innovations, DES and the employment situation in developed and underdeveloped regions and countries. Frugal innovations and DES may be an appropriate solution to tackle the employment problems in SA but cultural, social and economic barriers can affect the success of the overall process. Researchers and policymakers should, however, carefully evaluate the nature of target regions, the degree of cooperation and evaluation of various related barriers.

  • 2.
    Albertzeth, Gustav
    et al.
    Department of Industrial Engineering, Institut Teknologi Sepuluh Nopember, Surabaya, Indonesia.
    Pujawan, I. Nyoman
    Department of Industrial Engineering, Institut Teknologi Sepuluh Nopember, Surabaya, Indonesia.
    Hilletofth, Per
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. Department of Industrial Engineering and Management, School of Engineering, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Tjahjono, Benny
    Centre for Business in Society, Coventry University, Coventry, United Kingdom.
    Mitigating transportation disruptions in a supply chain: a cost-effective strategy2020In: International Journal of Logistics, ISSN 1367-5567, E-ISSN 1469-848X, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 139-158Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transportation disruptions can be damaging to a supply chain because goods may not arrive on time and this jeopardises the service level to the customers. While supply chain disruptions have gained significant attention from scholars, little has been done to explore these disruptions in the context of transportation. The study described in this paper aims to address disruptions occurring in the transportation of goods from a plant to a distribution centre. We modelled this real case to obtain insights on the effectiveness of different strategies to mitigate transportation disruptions. We evaluated four mitigation strategies and compared the outcomes in terms of service level and total costs: (1) the risk acceptance strategy, (2) the redundant stock strategy, (3) the flexible route strategy, and (4) the redundant-flexibility strategy. The results suggest that the best strategy differs depending on the budget that managers are willing to deploy to improve the service level. The simulation experiments and the use of the Incremental Cost Effectiveness Ratio (ICER) would be instrumental in helping decision makers in selecting the best disruption mitigation strategies where the best option would likely be different under varying circumstances. 

  • 3.
    Ali, Amir
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. 971202.
    Ali, Aweys
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management.
    Mårtensson, Fredrik
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management.
    Effektivisering av en produktionsprocess med hjälp av värdeflödeanalys och innovativa verktyg som AI2023Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In line with today's emergence of new technology, there is high competition within the manufacturing industry, which places higher demands on today's industries to develop new strategies to withstand the fierce competition. For this reason, today's industry needs to be more efficient and is becoming increasingly digitized, which is the core of the new industrial revolution called "industry 4.0". 

    The aim of this study is to investigate, with the help of value flow analysis, new innovative tools, and principles within lean production, whether the manufacturing process can be more efficient. The study was carried out at a manufacturing company that produces dehumidifiers and has ambitions to streamline it’s manufacturing process. 

    Through the literature review, site observations, interviews and data analysis, a comparison was made with the theory to find solutions to the problems that emerged. The results of this study show that it is theoretically possible to make a manufacturing process more efficient using these methods. It can be pointed out that one important study will be to test these solutions to see what results can be achieved. 

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 4.
    Alieva, Jamila
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Powell, Daryl
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway; SINTEF Manufacturing AS, Horten, Norway.
    The Automation of Lean Practices: Digitalized or Digitally Wasted?2021In: IFIP Advances in Information and Communication Technology / [ed] Alexandre Dolgui, Alain Bernard, David Lemoine, Gregor von Cieminski, David Romero, Springer , 2021, p. 651-661Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lean manufacturing has experienced massive changes under the influence of Industry 4.0, with the automation of lean practices becoming common among manufacturing companies in many countries and different industries. Automating lean practices promises a number of opportunities for growth and competitiveness. One of the key advantages of lean automation has been acknowledged to be the significant reduction of waste. Meanwhile, there is also discussion of a new form of waste: digital waste. However, do companies consider digital waste a part of production waste? It is also unclear if automation of lean practices is a trigger for digital waste with a negative impact on value creation. This paper aims to investigate companies with automated lean practices and the particular case of digital waste in automated processes. The research is based on case studies of manufacturing based in Sweden.

  • 5.
    Alieva, Jamila
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Powell, Daryl
    SINTEF Manufacturing AS, Horten, Norway; Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
    The Significance of Digital Waste in the Automation of Lean Practices2023In: Quality Management Journal, ISSN 1068-6967, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 121-134Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lean manufacturing has experienced massive changes under the influence of Industry 4.0 as the automation of lean practices has become common among manufacturing companies in many countries and across different industries. Automating lean practices promises several opportunities for growth and competitiveness. One of the acknowledged key advantages of lean automation has been the significant reduction of waste. Meanwhile, there is also discussion of a new form of waste: digital waste. However, do companies consider digital waste a part of production waste? It is also unclear if the automation of lean practices is a trigger for digital waste with a negative impact on value creation. This paper aims to investigate companies with automated lean practices and the digital waste generated by these practices. The research is based on three case studies of manufacturing companies based in Sweden. The originality of the study identifies and highlights the significance of various forms of digital waste, which is of academic and practical relevance. The study indicates that there is digital waste in supplier-related lean practice—automated JIT delivery—specifically in product-oriented and service-oriented technologies. There is digital waste in internally related lean practice—automated set-up—specifically in process-oriented technologies. Finally, there is digital waste in customer-related lean practice—digitally involved customers—in product-, service-, and process-oriented technologies.

  • 6.
    Alieva, Jamila
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Powell, Daryl John
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
    The significance of employee behaviours and soft management practices to avoid digital waste during a digital transformation2023In: International Journal of Lean Six Sigma, ISSN 2040-4166, E-ISSN 2040-4174, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 1-32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the perceived effects between soft management practices, employee behaviours and the implementation of digital technologies in manufacturing plants, as well as how these relate to the emergence of digital waste.

    Design/methodology/approach: This paper uses case-based research. Data was collected in two large manufacturing companies based in Norway and Sweden through semi-structured interviews with two management representatives and four shop-floor employees. The data was used to evaluate 29 variables describing lean- and total quality management (TQM)-associated employee behaviours and soft management practices, in light of digital transformation.

    Findings: The results suggest that several variables were positively influenced by the digital transformation process. These were top management leadership, middle management involvement, employee education, corporate social responsibility focus, innovation, knowledge sharing, work-family balance, psychological capital, job satisfaction and career commitment. Training employees, creativity, discretionary effort, turnover intention and proactivity appear to be negatively influenced by digital transformation The findings also indicate that several soft management practices and employee behaviours were not only influenced by manufacturing digitalization but also themselves influenced the process. The potential for digital waste creation was also detected in several variables, including reward and recognition and training employees.

    Practical implications: Managers, practitioners and academics may learn about the importance of certain managerial practices and employees’ behavioural needs during the digital transformation process. The findings may help in prioritizing TQM and soft lean management practices and certain employee behaviours during the digital transformation and in creating awareness of digital waste.

    Originality/value: This study builds on several existing studies discussing the impact of digital transformation on soft management practices and employee behaviours. It provides insights from a lean and TQM angle and offers a means of prioritizing certain practices and behaviours during a digital transformation. This study also highlights the significance of digital waste. 

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 7.
    Alieva, Jamila
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    von Haartman, Robin
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Digital collaboration within the supply chain: new booster for hidden lean potential2019Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores the hidden lean potential exposed by manufacturers’ usage of enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems. The potential can be classified into three types: unlocked lean potential in a connected ERP system, unlocked lean potential in an un-connected ERP system, and the lean potential for further unlocking in companies that do not use ERP systems when collaborating with suppliers/customers. Empirical data is obtained from two cases of manufacturing companies in Sweden and one ERP system company. The findings indicate that hidden lean potential can be unlocked through digital collaboration within the supply chain.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 8.
    Alieva, Jamila
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    von Haartman, Robin
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Digital collaboration within the supply chain: unlocking the hidden lean potential2021In: International Journal of Advanced Operations Management (IJAOM), ISSN 1758-938X, E-ISSN 1758-9398, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 1-20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Collaboration in a supply chain plays an important role for manufacturing companies that are simultaneously implementing lean and running enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems. This research aims to discover whether the usage of ERP at a supply chain level can boost internal hidden lean potential. Empirical data were obtained from three manufacturing cases in Sweden. The results show that ERP technology usage has a significant impact on discovering hidden lean potential of three types: unlocked hidden lean potential in an unconnected ERP system, unlocked hidden lean potential in a connected ERP system, and unlocked hidden lean potential in a shared ERP system. The findings indicate manufacturers should devote more effort to ensuring active usage of ERP systems internally as well as externally with their customers and suppliers. The transparency and collaboration provided by an ERP system will help these companies become leaner.

  • 9.
    Alieva, Jamila
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    von Haartman, Robin
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    DIGITAL MUDA - THE NEW FORM OF WASTE BY INDUSTRY 4.0.2019Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 10.
    Alieva, Jamila
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    von Haartman, Robin
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Digital Muda - The New Form of Waste by Industry 4.02020In: Proceeding International Conference on Operations and Supply Chain Management (OSCM), ISSN 2407-2273, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 269-278Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lean management is an approach where value is created through the reduction of waste. Eight forms of waste were identified by the Toyota Company as worth considering while managing an efficient production process: overproduction, waiting, transport, over processing, inventory, movement, defects, and unused creativity. Modern manufacturing plants are being transformed by Industry 4.0, the fourth industrial revolution, which promotes a wide variety of technological solutions to increase innovativeness and competitive advantages. Technological solutions are created on the basis of data that must be analyzed to enable manufacturers to be more strategic in the decision-making process and generate new profit channels through data analytics. A conceptual framework was developed to investigate if the inefficient usage of data has a negative impact on manufacturing performance through the decision-making process. Semi-structured interviews were conducted in two leading manufacturing companies in Sweden that are following lean principles. A new form of waste, digital waste, was defined. This paper suggests considering digital waste as a new type of muda (waste), which is its theoretical contribution. From a practical perspective, the results of the paper encourage practitioners to pay extra attention to data analytics, work on the reduction of digital waste and establish new revenue channels based on data analysis. Download full PDF  Get metrics  Rate article

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 11.
    Alieva, Jamila
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management.
    von Haartman, Robin
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management.
    Waste under the impact of digital technologies: Evidence from European manufacturing survey (EMS)2022In: The proceedings of the 29th international EurOMA conference, 2022Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is based on European Manufacturing Survey collected in 2019 for five countries -Sweden, Spain, Croatia, Austria, and Slovenia. The study reveals that majority of companieshave technologies that allow them automatically to collect data. Companies are also using thedata for different purposes, and often more than one purposes. We also found that many ofcommonly used digital technologies are also associated with automatically collected data.Although the literature suggests that ignorance of data collection may lead to defects, we findno connection to actual waste in this study.

  • 12.
    Almira, Memic
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management.
    Aida, Osmanovic
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management.
    Utformning av en ankomstkontroll: Möjligheter och utmaningar som en ankomstkontroll kan ge industriföretag2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Many companies strive to develop their arrival controls in an effective way as arrivals controls have proven to be significant for the companies. This is grounded in the fact that arrival controls improve the flow of production and minimize the risk for production errors since the controls enable an effective management of the company’s products and materials. Not establishing these controls consequently often leads to production default, stress and increased expenses. Nonetheless, many companies choose not to implement arrival controls because such implementations are accompanied by large costs. Furthermore, they require space, which smaller companies do not have.

    The purpose of this study is, through the analysis of previous literature and interaction with a local company, examine how efficient arrival controls can be structured. Additionally, this study aspires through, improvement proposals, to aid Munters AB in the construction of arrival controls.

    This is a qualitative case study conducted at Munters AB in Tobo. Empirical data was accumulated through semi-structured interviews, analytical observations and consistent visits to the company.

    Arrival controls are of significant importance for companies and the absence of such are undoubtly damaging for the company. This is evidential in the interviews, where both the quality director and the Lean coordinator were aware of the company’s shortcomings in this area. Further findings show that all workers in the production department experienced continuous defects in every day production and therefore hoped for an implementation of arrival controls. In conclusion the study found that Munters AB is in urgent need of arrival controls. However, in order for such an implementation to be as effective as possible, the company needs to utilize different methods, tools and system and crucial forward planning in production. 

    Download full text (pdf)
    Ankomstkontroll
  • 13.
    Alonso-Logroño, María Pilar
    et al.
    Universitat de Lleida, Spain.
    Bautista-Puig, Núria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Spain.
    Tendencias de investigación en Geografía Económica. Estudio bibliométrico de la Web of Science (1920-2020).: Research trends in Economic Geography. Bibliometric study of the Web ofScience (1920-2020)2022In: Revista de Estudios Andaluces, ISSN 0212-8594, no 43, p. 188-207Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the first tasks to tackle any scientific publication is to review all the scientific literature on the subject. This article presents a methodology that allows analyzing scientific trends in a discipline through a bibliometric analysis. Specifically, the field of Economic Geography is used as a case study, Web of Science (WoS) has been chosen as the database for this analysis. With a set of 4,307 publications, various bibliometric indicators are analyzed, such as the evolution of scientific production, the agents involved (countries and organizations) and topics addressed, in order to see the evolution of the scientific output and the thematic specializations of Economic Geography from 1920 to the present.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 14.
    Ascic, Ivana
    et al.
    Jönköping University.
    Ascic, Josip
    Jönköping University.
    Hilletofth, Per
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. Jönköping University.
    Pimenta, Marcio Lopes
    Federal University of Uberlandia, Brazil.
    Hilmola, Olli-Pekka
    LUT University, Finland; Estonian Maritime Academy, Tallinn University of Technology (Taltech).
    An evaluation of critical capabilities and improvement areas for competitive manufacturing in a developed country environment2022In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 14, no 11, article id 6678Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This research evaluates the critical capabilities and improvement areas for competitive manufacturing in a developed-country environment. A multiple-case-study approach is applied, consisting of three manufacturing firms located in Sweden. The case study combines both quantitative and qualitative evaluations of the critical capabilities found in the extant literature. The research reveals fifteen critical capabilities and sixteen improvement areas for competitive manufacturing in a developed-country environment. The results show that the firms develop capabilities in a cumulative manner, starting with cost and quality, continuing with time and flexibility, and finally trying to improve innovation and sustainability. To develop competitive manufacturing operations in developed counties, it is therefore vital to improve capabilities related to time, flexibility, innovation, or sustainability. Irrespective of the targeted capabilities, they must contribute to cost-efficient operations and high quality must always be maintained. The efforts to develop capabilities related to innovation and sustainability may be expensive in the short term, however they can provide better cumulative results and competitiveness in the long term. 

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 15.
    Ayoubi, Hilal
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management.
    Maher Ali, Ali
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management.
    Förståelsen om FN:s globala hållbarhetsmål: Hur arbetar småföretag med FN:s globala hållbarhetsmål2021Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The biggest challenge of the time today is climate change and its negative effects. One reason for many cases of political inequality, health risks and human rights inequalities is consumption and production patterns that lead to environmental degradation and injustice. Statistics from the Swedish Agency for Growth (2020) have shown that almost half of Swedish industry works with sustainable work. On the other hand, however, it is important to observe that the work towards sustainable development has expanded and become increasingly complicated to meet the latest conditions. 

    The purpose of this study is to investigate how highly the smaller companies value the UN's Global Sustainability Goals 12.4 in two different industries, and how they actively work to improve that work. The purpose has been fulfilled by the authors conducting interviews with two case companies, thus the authors have conducted a literature study in areas considered relevant. The study identified two key factors, the first key factor being that Gästrike Ekogas does not work on the basis of the global goals and therefore does not have values. In order to improve the work in sustainability, it has also been demonstrated that the business lacks resources. The other key factor identified by the authors is that St:Erik's vision is that they should be the obvious choice in sustainable community building, which indicates a lot that they have a serious value about sustainability. They also have the environment as a focus area, and which they work with constantly. As the business takes into account the chemical emissions and its consequences, and that St:Eriks also works constantly to reduce these emissions with the help of resources that exist within the business and with the help of third parties. 

    It has also been demonstrated that the activities in question should have the capability to combine new technologies, changes to practices, with new business models. In order for businesses to fortunately adopt and implement sustainable consumption and production, it is basically about demanding change in the organization's vision and education. Since St:Erik's products have a long lifespan, it was very important for them to relate to the UN's 12th global goals as it includes production and consumption.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 16.
    Aytac, Selenay
    et al.
    Long Island University, NY, USA.
    Bautista-Puig, Núria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. Complutense University of Madrid, Madrid, Spain.
    Orduña-Malea, Enrique
    Universitat Politècnica de València, Valencia, Spain.
    Tran, Clara Y.
    Stony Brook University, NY, USA.
    Contribution of carbon footprint research towards the triple bottom line of sustainability2023In: Environmental Science and Pollution Research, ISSN 0944-1344, E-ISSN 1614-7499, Vol. 30, p. 88331-88349Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Carbon footprint (CF) research has received increasing attention in recent years, as evidenced by a rise in publications and citations, reflecting a growing concern for the environmental impact of human activities. However, the alignment of this scientific literature with the three dimensions of sustainability performance provided by the TBL paradigm (people, planet, and profit) has received limited attention. This study addresses this research gap by undertaking a large-scale bibliometric analysis of 9032 Web of Science (WoS) publications from 1992 to 2020. At the macro (journals) and micro (papers) levels, a methodology approach to classify research publications according to TBL dimensions was designed. The results indicate that the output and impact of CF research are balanced with respect to the environmental (planet) and economic (prosperity/profit) dimensions, while the social impact is balanced with respect to the people+profit dimensions. Other than that, “Affordable and Clean Energy” (3761 publications) and “Climate Action” (3091 publications) are the most frequently represented (and interconnected) objectives. The results obtained contribute to a greater understanding of the contribution of CF research to the attainment of the SDGs.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 17.
    Barath, Christian
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management.
    Amini, Nasrollah
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management.
    Produktinformationens inverkan på returer inom e-handel: Fallstudie på tre företag inom modebranschen2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Med e-handelns snabba expansion har även returerna ökat, returvolymen inom e-handel kan vara så hög som 50% (Dissanayake och Singh, 2007). Returer kostar inte bara pengar utan påverkar även miljön i form av bl.a. ökade transporter. De vanligaste returorsakerna inom modebranschen är storlek och passform vilket kan härledas till bristande produktinformation som t.ex. undermåliga storleksguider. Tidigare forskning om produktinformation har oftast berört vikten av produktinformation vid konsumentköp samt vilka egenskaper i produktinformationen som är viktiga. (Chiu et al, 2014; Manvai och Venkataram, 2005; Markopoulos, Arin och Ungar, 2016) Syftet med denna fallstudie är att undersöka hur produktinformationen påverkar antalet produktreturer hos e-handelsföretag i modebranschen. Studiens frågeställningar berör hur fallföretagen arbetar med produktinformation och om det har påverkat returvolymen samt fallföretagens hållbarhetsarbete. Studien är baserad på en kvalitativ metod och med hjälp av semistrukturerade intervjuer med tre fallföretag besvaras studiens syfte och frågeställningar. Fallföretagen i denna studie arbetar med försäljning inom modebranschen, två av dessa är stora företag och har både fysiska butiker och e-handel. Det tredje fallföretaget är ett mindre företag som enbart har e-handel. Studien visar att fallföretagen får samma gynnsamma effekt av arbetet med produktinformation även om drivkraften bakom arbetet är olika. Studien visar även att produktinformationen kan ses som en kanal för att effektivt förmedla hållbarhetsarbete till kunderna. Studien bidrar med bredare kunskap om produktinformation samt att studien kan ligga till grund för vidare forskning om produktinformationens inverkan på returer. Studien styrker även vissa delar av tidigare forskning inom returer i modebranschen.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 18.
    Barreiro-Gen, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. University of A Coruna, A Coruna, Spain.
    Discussing Approaches to Standard of Living2019In: Decent Work and Economic Growth: Encyclopedia of the UN Sustainable Development Goals / [ed] Walter Leal Filho, Anabela Marisa Azul, Luciana Brandli, Pinar Gökcin Özuyar, Tony Wall, Cham: Springer, 2019Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Barreiro-Gen, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Evaluating the effects of mobile applications on course assessment: A quasi-experiment on a macroeconomics course2020In: International Review of Economics Education, ISSN 1477-3880, Vol. 34, article id 100184Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Universities are facing the need to rethink their educational strategies, especially due to the emergence of new technologies, such as mobile applications, which have had great expectations. Previous studies have been focused on changes in student engagement from using mobile applications in the classroom, whereas there has been little research on the impact of mobile applications on student assessment. This research uses a quasi-experimental study to examine the relationship between student assessment and the use of a mobile application. Two groups of students (a control and an experimental group) were tested in the same academic semester with the same lecturer. Two analyses were carried out (t-test and difference-in-differences) to evaluate this relationship. Contrary to the general expectations, the results showed that there is no significant difference on assessment when comparing the two groups’ scores. However, students showed a positive attitude in engaging with the mobile application. Although there has been an increase on the use of mobile applications in classrooms, they do not directly affect student scores. This research shows that mobile applications should be used as a complement to traditional education, and not as a substitute to it.

  • 20.
    Barreiro-Gen, Maria
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Bautista-Puig, Núria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Women in sustainability research: Examining gender authorship differences in peer-reviewed publications2022In: Frontiers in Sustainability, ISSN 2673-4524, no 3, article id 959438Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Higher education institutions (HEIs) have been undertaking considerable efforts to embed sustainability into their system; however, there have been limited studies on the incorporation of sustainability into research. In parallel, it has been found that women have an important role in contributing to sustainability since they are more engaged and have a more holistic perspective on sustainability than men. These two phenomena have resulted in limited studies about the contribution of women to sustainability research (i.e., in scientific publishing). A bibliometric analysis of more than 39,000 documents (with 147,090 authorships) was done to fill this gap, focusing on sustainability peer-review publications in Europe between 2015 and 2020. The results show that women's presence in sustainability research has been increasing during the last years; however, there are still few female authorship publications, even in fields that have been traditionally women-oriented. In addition, their publications have been less recognized by the scientific community. The results also show substantial gender differences in terms of author leadership, where female senior researchers are more likely to mentor female junior researchers than men. Female researchers tend to collaborate nationally, but they could improve their international collaboration since this can improve their research and impact. More support should be provided to female researchers to help foster women's sustainability engagement and holistic perspectives, reduce existing negative feedback loops, and increase positive ones. Achieving gender equality is sine qua non in achieving sustainable societies.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 21.
    Barreiro-Gen, Maria
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Carpenter, Angela
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. School of Earth and Environment, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK.
    von Haartman, Robin
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. Organisational Sustainability Ltd., Cardiff, UK.
    Examining Relations Between Public Participation and Public Expenditure: Opinions from English and French Users on Environmental Issues in the English Channel2019In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 11, no 8, article id 2230Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Governments need to decide how to allocate their public expenditure, which is commonly misconstrued as simply targeting social issues. Most scientific literature highlights that the role of public spending is to enhance social welfare and fight poverty and inequality. Nonetheless, public expenditure also includes spending on environmental issues. This paper analyses relations between public participation, support for public expenditure, and pro-environmental behaviour (PEB) intentions in the English Channel region. An online public survey was developed to investigate public use of the English and French sides and the public's willingness to change their behaviour to better protect the Channel region. The survey was undertaken in the summer of 2014 and was answered by 2000 respondents. The Channel region public is willing to participate more in behaviour that involves direct changes or switches between buying/purchasing choices. In contrast, there is less willingness to engage in pro-environmental behaviour intentions that involve more active engagement activities. French respondents were slightly less inclined to change their consumer behaviour intentions, while women and older people were slightly more likely to do so. This research shows that pro-environmental behaviour could positively affect support for proposed public expenditure on environmental issues.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 22.
    Barreiro-Gen, Maria
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. University of Gävle.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Analysing the incorporation of Sustainable Development into European Higher Education Institutions’ curricula2019Conference paper (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    Presentation
  • 23.
    Barreiro-Gen, Maria
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    How circular is the circular economy? Analysing the implementation of circular economy in organisations2020In: Business Strategy and the Environment, ISSN 0964-4733, E-ISSN 1099-0836, Vol. 29, no 8, p. 3484-3494, article id 2590Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Circular Economy (CE) has become one of the most recent ways to address environmental sustainability. CE activities focus exclusively on one of three levels (macro-level, meso-level, and micro-level). The majority of CE research has focused on the macro- and meso-levels, while research on the micro-level has been limited. This paper focusses on the latter by analysing how organisations have implemented the four Rs (reduction, repairing, remanufacturing, and recycling). A survey was sent to a database of 5,299 contacts from different organisations, from whom 256 complete responses were obtained. The results show that organisations focus on reducing and recycling more than repairing and remanufacturing, and in particular on internal CE efforts. Some organisations that engage with the 4Rs do not do it under the CE umbrella, whereas some that claim to apply CE have low levels of engagement with the 4Rs. The results indicate that organisations are using the four Rs to contribute to CE, but not all of them are aware that they are applying CE principles. The paper highlights that organisations need to improve their four Rs efforts to contribute more to CE by better linking its theory with practice. CE also has to be implemented outside the organisations, in a more holistic way, e.g. through better collaboration with stakeholders on CE efforts and activities. This research stresses that the gap between CE theory and practice needs to be closed to make Circular Economy circular.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 24.
    Barreiro-Gen, Maria
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Carpenter, Angela
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Bautista-Puig, Núria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Analysing sustainability change management in government owned companies: Experiences from European ports2023In: Social Responsibility Journal, ISSN 1747-1117, E-ISSN 1758-857X, Vol. 19, no 6, p. 1037-1050Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    Government-owned companies (GOCs), such as ports, have engaged in efforts to become more sustainable. Most of such efforts have been technological and policy ones and mainly focusing on the environment, with limited research on organisational change management. This paper aims to provide insights into how ports have been addressing sustainability change forces and pressures.

    Design/methodology/approach

    Twelve semi-structured interviews were conducted with top-level directors and sustainability managers, representing ports across Europe’s maritime regions and a range of port types and sizes. The interviews were analysed using grounded theory’s constant comparative analysis.

    Findings

    The findings highlighted that the ports’ success in their process to become more sustainable depends on how they take advantage of the thrust forces and reduce the drag ones. The findings serve to develop the “ports’ sustainability change management framework”, with five stages: reactive, proactive, transactive, interactive, and sustainable port.

    Practical implications

    Ports, and other GOCs, should capitalise on their private–public nature in their contribution to making societies more sustainable by adopting a holistic perspective and interactive changes.

    Originality/value

    This paper provides a dynamic perspective on corporate sustainability efforts, particularly on GOCs, through organisational change management complementing technocentric and managerial approaches.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 25.
    Barreiro-Gen, Maria
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Temel, Melis
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Carpenter, Angela
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Exploring new waters for sustainability: gender equality in European seaports2021Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ports have been working towards becoming more sustainable. Although gender equality (SDG5) is very important within the 17 United Nations Sustainable Development Goals, it is ranked almost at the bottom of port priorities. The aim of this research is to provide insights into how ports have been addressing gender equality in their efforts to contribute to sustainability. Twelve semi-structured interviews were conducted with directors and sustainability managers from six European countries. The responses from interviewees were analysed using Grounded Theory’s constant comparative analysis.

    The findings show that European ports have engaged in measures aimed at contributing to sustainability through gender equality classified in five stages: (1) Gender segregation, which needs to be overcome, and is, in many cases, the starting point; (2) Compliance with national laws and regulation, e.g. in recruitment and salaries; (3) Gender equity, reducing barriers to entry and compensate for the historical and social disadvantages that women had previously suffered from; (4) Gender equality, guaranteeing the equal treatment of men and women in all processes; and (5) More sustainable ports. Achieving gender equality is a sine qua non to make ports more sustainable, i.e. integrating social issues of sustainability with economic and environmental ones. Internal and external forces affect each of the stages, where thrust forces help ports reduce gender segregation and advance towards becoming more sustainability and drag forces slow or block the efforts and may lead to returning to a previous stage. The findings were used to develop a “Gender equality for sustainability in ports” framework.

    This research is especially related to SDG5, target 5.1 (End all forms of discrimination against all women and girls everywhere), and 5.5 (Ensure women’s full and effective participation and equal opportunities for leadership at all levels of decision-making in political, economic and public life). 

    Ports, and other traditionally male-dominated industries, could capitalise on women’s holistic perspective and higher engagement to better contribute to accelerating the progress to make Europe more sustainable, especially in these testing times.

  • 26.
    Barreiro-Gen, Maria
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Temel, Melis
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Carpenter, Angela
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Gender equality for sustainability in ports: Developing a framework2021In: Marine Policy, ISSN 0308-597X, E-ISSN 1872-9460, Vol. 131, article id 104593Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ports have increasingly been addressing sustainability issues; however, gender equality has been a low priority in such efforts. This paper is aimed at providing insights into how ports have been addressing gender equality to contribute to sustainability. Twelve semi-structured interviews were conducted with top-level port managers from six European countries. The responses from the interviewees were analysed using Grounded Theory’s constant comparative analysis. The findings show that European ports have engaged in gender equality measures aimed at contributing to sustainability through gender equality in five stages: (1) Gender segregation, which needs to be overcome, and is, in many cases, the starting point; (2) Compliance with national laws and regulation; (3) Gender equity; (4) Gender equality; and (5) More sustainable ports. Internal and external forces affect each of the stages, where thrust forces help ports reduce gender segregation and advance towards becoming more sustainable and drag forces slow or block the efforts and may lead to returning to a previous stage of the framework. The findings were integrated to develop a “Gender equality for sustainability in ports” framework. Gender equality is a sine qua non for ports, and other male oriented industries, in becoming more sustainable.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 27.
    Barreiro-Gen, Maria
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. University of Gävle.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Zafar, Afnan
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Changes in Sustainability Priorities in Organisations due to the COVID-19 Outbreak: Averting Environmental Rebound Effects on Society2020In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 12, no 12, article id 5031Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The COVID-19 outbreak has affected societies and organisations in an unprecedented way. This has resulted in negative impacts to economic and social issues, but it is a “blessing in disguise” for environmental issues. This paper analyses how the outbreak has affected organisations’ sustainability priorities. Prior to the COVID-19 outbreak, such priorities were on the economic dimension followed by the environmental and social dimensions. A survey was sent to 11,657 organisations to analyse such changes, with a 5.60% response rate. The results show that for organisations, the main priority is now on the social dimension, followed by the economic one; however, the environmental dimension has suffered a negative impact in prioritisation, regardless of organisation type, country where they are based, organisation size, or the time they have been working on sustainability. We are currently facing an environmental conundrum, where air quality has improved and pollution has decreased in societies, but organisations are starting to neglect such environmental issues. The COVID-19 outbreak is an opportunity for organisations to better contribute to sustainability by ensuring that the efforts that have been undertaken in the last three decades are not forgotten, and that societies and organisations are better coupled to face such crises and avert rebound effects.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 28.
    Barreiro-Gen, Maria
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management.
    Renzi, Maria Francesca
    Department of Business Studies, Roma Tre University, Rome, Italy.
    Tortato, Cíntia S. B.
    Department of Human Sciences and Education, Instituto Federal de Educação, Ciência e Tecnologia do Paraná (IFPR), Curitiba, Paraná, Brazil.
    Editorial: Women in sustainability: organizational sustainability 20212023In: Frontiers in Sustainability, E-ISSN 2673-4524, Vol. 4, article id 1240059Article in journal (Refereed)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 29.
    Bautista-Puig, Núria
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Aleixo, Ana Marta
    University of Aveiro, Portugal; Polytechnic Institute of Leira, Portugal.
    Leal, Susana
    Polytechnic Institute of Santarém, Portugal.
    Azeiteiro, Ulisses
    University of Aveiro, Portugal.
    Costas, Rodrigo
    University of Leiden, Netherlands; Stellenbosch University, South Africa.
    Unveiling the Research Landscape of Sustainable Development Goals and Their Inclusion in Higher Education Institutions and Research Centers: Major Trends in 2000–20172021In: Frontiers in Sustainability, E-ISSN 2673-4524, Vol. 2, article id 620743Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) have become the international framework for sustainability policy. Its legacy is linked with the Millennium Development Goals (MDG), established in 2000. In this paper a scientometric analysis was conducted to: (1) Present a new methodological approach to identify the research output related to both SDGs and MDGs (M&SDGs) from 2000 to 2017, with the aim of mapping the global research related to M&SDGs; (2) Describe the thematic specialization based on keyword co-occurrence analysis and citation bursts; and (3) Classify the scientific output into individual SDGs (based on an ad-hoc glossary) and assess SDGs interconnections. Publications conceptually related to M&SDGs (defined by the set of M&SDG core publications and a scientometric expansion based on direct citations) were identified in the in-house CWTS Web of Science database. A total of 25,299 publications were analyzed, of which 21,653 (85.59%) were authored by Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) or academic research centers (RCs). The findings reveal the increasing participation of these organizations in this research (660 institutions in 2000–2005 to 1,744 institutions involved in 2012–2017). Some institutions present both a high production and specialization on M&SDG topics (e.g., London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine and World Health Organization); and others with a very high specialization although lower production levels (e.g., Stockholm Environment Institute). Regarding the specific topics of research, health (especially in developing countries), women, and socio-economic issues are the most salient. Moreover, it has been observed an important interlinkage in the research outputs of some SDGs (e.g., SDG11 “Sustainable Cities and Communities” and SDG3 “Good Health and Well-Being”). This study provides first evidence of such interconnections, and the results of this study could be useful for policymakers in order to promote a more evidenced-based setting for their research agendas on SDGs.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 30.
    Bautista-Puig, Núria
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Barreiro-Gen, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Organisations' contributions to the SDGs2021Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sustainable development and sustainability have appeared as concepts to help address the economic,environmental, and social impacts from previous generations, on this generation, and future ones through a holistic perspective. The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) have become the international framework for sustainability policy. The 17 SDGs and 169 targets were agreed upon by the 193 member states of the UN in2015 and are to be achieved by 2030. It should be noted that the SDGs were designed by governments for governments. These are based on the principles of: (1) a statement of a social-political priority (goal), (2) a time-bound quantitative aspect to be achieved (target), and (3) the measurement to monitor its progress(indicator). Since the SDGs (i.e. the macro level) are fairly new there is very limited research yet on how organisations (i.e. the micro level) contribute to them, or how such contributions could be advanced.Organisations civil society; companies; and public sector organisations (PSOs) have been instrumental in driving sustainability. In the last lustrum, there has been an increasing interest in organisational sustainability, where the importance of sustainability’s dimensions depends on an organisation’s nature and purpose. The contributions of organisations to sustainability, and by implication to the SDGs, have been proposed by a number of authors,where the most complete definition states that: such contributions entail the continuous incorporation and integration of sustainability issues in the organisation’s system elements (operations and production, strategy and management, governance, organisational systems, service provision, and assessment and reporting), as well as change processes and their rate of change. In this research, we will present some case studies of organisations contributing to the SDGs. The research group is an international leader and responsible for several publications in the field of sustainability, organizational change management, sustainable business models, sustainability assessment and reporting, circular economy, collaboration for sustainability, or education for sustainable development, among others. The multidisciplinary character of the group is a strength that defines our priority research area, mainly focused on sustainability. In this regard, case studies such as the contribution of HigherEducation Institutions to the SDGs or organizational change management in companies will be presented. The results presented will further the discussions on how organisations contribute to the SDGs, and how the micro and macro-level can be better connected.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Abstract
  • 31.
    Bautista-Puig, Núria
    et al.
    Department of Library and Information Sciences, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid. Spain.
    Barreiro-Gen, Maria
    Department of Economics, Faculty of Economics and Business, Universidad de Coruña, Coruña, Spain.
    Statulevičiūtė, Gustė
    Public Policy and Management Institute (PPMI), Vilnius, Lithuania.
    Stančiauskas, Vilius
    Public Policy and Management Institute (PPMI), Vilnius, Lithuania.
    Dikmener, Gokhan
    ICPSD SDG AI Lab, United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), Istanbul, Turkey.
    Akylbekova, Dina
    ICPSD SDG AI Lab, United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), Istanbul, Turkey.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. Organisational Sustainability, London, UK.
    Unraveling public perceptions of the Sustainable Development Goals for better policy implementation2024In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 912, article id 169114Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Public participation is crucial for policy-making and can contribute to strengthening democracies and decision-making. Public participation can help to address sustainability challenges and plays a key role in attaining the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). While the SDGs are policy concepts, there has been limited research conducted on how the public perceives the SDGs. Public participation in scientific research has been carried out through citizen science (CS). This paper analyzes the public's perception of the SDGs through CS and how the public can participate in their implementation. The paper uses the OSDG community platform, a citizen science platform with >2000 participants, to analyze public perception of the SDGs. A set of 40,062 excerpts of text (v2023-01-01), a topic modeling and agreement scores by using CorTexT Manager software, was analyzed. The results show that some SDGs, e.g. health (SDG3) or life below water (SDG14), have higher levels of agreement from the public, whilst for other SDGs the public disagree on their perception, (e.g. zero hunger). The paper shows that issues affecting citizens' daily lives (e.g. in People related goals) tend to have a higher level of agreement among volunteers, while economic issues and directives have greater discrepancies. The results provide an overview of the differences in public perception on the SDGs and their implementation. The misperceptions regarding the SDGs should be reduced to achieve a better implementation, improve public participation, and help policy-making processes.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 32.
    Bautista-Puig, Núria
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. Research Institute for Higher Education and Science (INAECU), Autonomous University of Madrid (UAM) and Carlos III University of Madrid (UC3M), 126 Madrid Str., 28903 Getafe, Spain.
    Benayas, Javier
    Research Institute for Higher Education and Science (INAECU), Autonomous University of Madrid (UAM) and Carlos III University of Madrid (UC3M), 126 Madrid Str., 28903 Getafe, Spain; Departamento de Ecología, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, C/Darwin 2, 28049 Madrid, Spain .
    Mañana-Rodríguez, Jorge
    Research Institute for Higher Education and Science (INAECU), Autonomous University of Madrid (UAM) and Carlos III University of Madrid (UC3M), 126 Madrid Str., 28903 Getafe, Spain.
    Suárez, Marta
    Departamento de Ecología, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, C/Darwin 2, 28049 Madrid, Spain; UNESCO Chair in Sustainable Development and Environmental Education, University of the Basque Country, Barrio Sarriena s/n, 48940 Leioa, Spain.
    Sanz-Casado, Elías
    Research Institute for Higher Education and Science (INAECU), Autonomous University of Madrid (UAM) and Carlos III University of Madrid (UC3M), 126 Madrid Str., 28903 Getafe, Spain.
    The role of urban resilience in research and its contribution to sustainability2022In: Cities, ISSN 0264-2751, E-ISSN 1873-6084, Vol. 126, article id 103715Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Urban resilience is an emergent concept that is receiving an increasing attention. Its definition is linked with the ability of an urban system to resist, maintain continuity and recover through all stresses while adapting and transforming towards sustainability. The aim of this study is two-fold. First, we analyse the research output on urban resilience using bibliometric techniques and Web of Science (WoS) in order to define the scope and identify topics in the urban resilience literature. CiteSpace software is used to establish the intellectual framework. Second, their contribution to sustainability dimensions and Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) based on the research output is explored.

    For that purpose, we examined 1014 publications during the period 1998–2020. The findings reveal urban resilience literature has grown since the 2009.A specialization in recent years from more theoretical research to a more practical is identified. In terms of contribution towards sustainability, the findings show the number of publications that directly address sustainability is scarce and more balanced to environmental and social perspectives. These findings can provide a better understanding of the patterns and trends in the field and provides first evidence of the contribution of academic research on urban resilience to sustainability.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 33.
    Bautista-Puig, Núria
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Elba, Mauleón
    Elías, Sanz-Casado
    University Carlos III of Madrid.
    Analysis of Social, Environmental and Economic Sustainability Core: A Bibliometric Overview2021In: International Journal of Innovation and Sustainable Development, ISSN 1740-8822, E-ISSN 1740-8830, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 356-381Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sustainability has become a global concern in the 21st century. However, sustainability is an ambivalent concept that can be interpreted in many ways. In the beginning, it was environmentally-related. Later, however, it was linked to social or economic sustainability, which was known as the triple bottom-line or the three-pillar model (social/economic and environmental sustainability). Later, additional dimensions were incorporated, such as institutional, cultural, or even spatial. As a result of the growth and importance of sustainability, this study provides a comprehensive overview of the core of sustainability. With that aim in mind, we will analyse the following aspects of scientific production: volume of scientific output, primary agents involved (countries, institutions), web of science (WoS) categories, collaborations, acknowledgement patterns, and thematic analysis. The findings in this paper suggest an increasing growth in scientific output in all areas of sustainability, albeit with different patterns (e.g., collaboration, specialisation) among the three pillars.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 34.
    Bautista-Puig, Núria
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University Carlos III of Madrid (Spain).
    Jorge, Mañana-Rodríguez
    University Carlos III of Madrid (Spain).
    Mapping the (mis)alignment of scientific output with the Agenda 2030: the case of the YUFE network2020Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sustainable Development Goals have emerged as a global strategy to ensure a better and sustainable future for all, balancing the economic, social, and environmental development. These goals represent a long-term perspective that needs to be embedded in the decision-making of governments, businesses and society. Therefore, science, technology and innovation has been recognized as one of the main drivers for shifting to a sustainable path. However, its contribution to sustainable goals remains a complex and unresolved debate.  

    Therefore, the aim of this study is twofold. It aims to analyze the (mis)alignment of research in HEIS towards sustainable goals, as well as to analyze the interlinkage among the 17 goals. We examined the research papers from ten universities that compose the Young Universities for the Future of Europe (YUFE) Network. We analyzed 78,241 papers from the Web of Science during the period 2015-2019. We present a novel approach by using an open-source tool called OSDG, which combines an ontology-based approach from previous projects and then matches to the fields of study from Microsoft Academic. Sixty-eight percent of the papers were assigned to, at least, one goal. 

    The findings reveal the increasing participation of the institutions of this network in this research. We find that the goals more frequently addressed are related to Health, Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure, and Climate Change. We also compare this information with the targets and indicators on each goal to assess the similarity. These preliminary results can provide a better understanding of the research contribution to sustainable goals.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Presentation
  • 35.
    Bautista-Puig, Núria
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Jorge, Mañana-Rodríguez
    University Carlos III of Madrid.
    Antonio Eleazar, Serrano-López
    University Carlos III of Madrid.
    Role taxonomy of green and sustainable science and technology journals: exportation, importation, specialization and interdisciplinarity2021In: Scientometrics, ISSN 0138-9130, E-ISSN 1588-2861, Vol. 126, p. 3871-3982Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sustainability science is, per se, a topic that is inherently interdisciplinarity and orientedtowards the resolution of societal problems. In this paper, we propose a classifcation ofscientifc journals that composes the journal category “Green and Sustainable Science andTechnology” in the period 2014–2018 through the entropy-based disciplinarity indicator(EBDI). This indicator allows the classifcation of scientifc journals in four types based onthe citing and cited dimensions: knowledge importer, knowledge exporter, disciplinary andinterdisciplinarity. Moreover, the relationship between this taxonomy and the JCR bibliometric indicators and its predictive capacity of the taxonomy is explored through a CHAIDtree. As well, relations between the Web of Science categories, journals and taxonomy areexplored by the co-occurrence of categories and correspondence analysis. Results suggestthat the great majority of journals in this feld are specialized or interdisciplinary. However,over the 5-year period proposed in this study, interdisciplinary journals tend to be far morestable than specialized ones. The decision tree has shown that the number of citations is thevariable with the greatest discriminating capacity.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 36.
    Bautista-Puig, Núria
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Barreiro-Gen, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Developing a sustainability implementation framework: insights from academic research on tools, initiatives and approaches2023In: Environment, Development and Sustainability, ISSN 1387-585X, E-ISSN 1573-2975, p. 11011-11031Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sustainability has been proposed to address societal challenges. A number of efforts have been undertaken to implement sustainability, particularly through frameworks such as tools, initiatives and approaches (TIAs). Most of the research on the implementation efforts has been in the corporate context. This paper is aimed at analysing the implementation of TIAs in academic research. A bibliometric analysis of twenty TIAs during the period 1961–2020 was carried out to analyse their implementation in academic research. The results highlight that there has been research published on all the TIAs analysed. The TIAs have a better balance and interrelations between the sustainability dimensions in their implementation than in the theory. The results show that for a better implementation of TIAs in academic research it is necessary to address sustainability dimensions (economic, environmental, social, and time) in a holistic and balanced way considering alignment of general and specific efforts, i.e. TIAs, and congruence (linking ‘theory’ and ‘implementation’). The results were integrated to propose a ‘Sustainability Implementation Framework’ (SIF), which is divided into three levels (i.e., Initiatives, Approaches, and Tools). The TIAs implementation should follow more strictly the definitions, or, perhaps, the TIAs definitions should be redefined to encompass the insights from their implementation.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 37.
    Bautista-Puig, Núria
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Barreiro-Gen, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Disentangling the Connections of Tools, Initiatives and Approaches (TIAs) in Literature2021Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Bautista-Puig, Núria
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    López‑Illescas, Carmen
    University Complutense of Madrid, Spain.
    Moed, Henk F.
    Sapienza University of Rome, Italy.
    Journal flipping to Open Access: The Perception of Spanish Journal Managers2021In: Publishing research quarterly, ISSN 1053-8801, E-ISSN 1936-4792, Vol. 37, p. 525-545Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a growing interest in determining the factors that influence a journal’s flipping to Open Access (OA). Using semi-structured interviews combined with bibliometric indicators, this paper uncovers the perception of Spanish managers related to OA and the decision to flip. The key research questions are twofold: How well do bibliometric measures reflect the changes in the status of the journal? How do journal managers perceive the flipping process? In order to answer these, twelve semi-structured interviews were conducted with journal managers of Spanish Journals. The findings suggest the great majority of managers are aware of the indicators, but only two considered they reflect their reality. The results indicate as the main motivations to flip to OA: being imposed by the host institution, economic reasons, and increase visibility and internationalization. An increase in the number of submissions, visibility, or internationalization since the transition is perceived as a benefit while the loss of interchanges with other institutions is seen as the major drawback. Although flipping to OA is perceived by the managers to have many advantages, it raises some challenges too, especially the need for funding, lack of resources capacity for technical support, and the creation of alliances.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 39.
    Bautista-Puig, Núria
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    López‑Illescas, Carmen
    University Complutense of Madrid, spain.
    Moed, Henrik F
    Sapienza University of Rome, Italy.
    Journal flipping to Open Access: The perception of Spanish journal managers2021In: Proceedings of the International Conference on Scientometrics and Informetrics, Leuven, Belgium: ISSI , 2021, p. 99-104Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a growing interest in determining the factors that influence a journal's flipping to Open Access (OA). Using semi-structured interviews combined with bibliometric indicators, this paper uncovers the perception of Spanish managers related to Open Access and the decision to flip. The key research questions are twofold: How well do bibliometric measures reflect the changes in the status of the journal? How do journal managers perceive the flipping process? In order to answer these, twelve semi-structured interviews were conducted with journal managers of Spanish Journals. The findings suggest the great majority of managers are aware of the indicators, but only two mentioned they reflect their reality. An increase in the number of submissions, visibility, or internationalization since the transition is perceived as a benefit while the loss of interchanges with other institutions is seen as the major drawback. Although flipping to OA is perceived by the managers to have many advantages, it raises some challenges too, especially the need for funding, lack of resources capacity for technical support, and the creation of alliances.

  • 40.
    Bautista-Puig, Núria
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Orduña-Malea, Enrique
    Universitat Politècnica de València, Valencia, Spain.
    Perez-Esparrells, Carmen
    Faculty of Economic Sciences and Business, Autonomous University of Madrid, Madrid, Spain.
    Enhancing sustainable development goals or promoting universities? An analysis of the times higher education impact rankings2022In: International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, ISSN 1467-6370, E-ISSN 1758-6739, Vol. 23, no 8, p. 211-231Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    This study aims to analyse and evaluate the methodology followed by the Times Higher Education Impact Rankings (THE-IR), as well as the coverage obtained and the data offered by this ranking, to determine if its methodology reflects the degree of sustainability of universities, and whether their results are accurate enough to be used as a data source for research and strategic decision-making.

    Design/methodology/approach

    A summative content analysis of the THE-IR methodology was conducted, paying special attention to the macro-structure (university score) and micro-structure (sustainable development goals [SDG] score) levels of the research-related metrics. Then, the data published by THE-IR in the 2019, 2020 and 2021 edition was collected via web scraping. After that, all the data was statistically analysed to find out performance rates, SDGs’ success rates and geographic distributions. Finally, a pairwise comparison of the THE-IR against the Times Higher Education World University Rankings (THE-WUR) was conducted to calculate overlap measures.

    Findings

    Severe inconsistencies in the THE-IR methodology have been found, offering a distorted view of sustainability in higher education institutions, allowing different strategic actions to participate in the ranking (interested, strategic, committed and outperformer universities). The observed growing number of universities from developing countries and the absence of world-class universities reflect an opportunity for less-esteemed institutions, which might have a chance to gain reputation based on their efforts towards sustainability, but from a flawed ranking which should be avoided for decision-making.

    Practical implications

    University managers can be aware of the THE-IR validity when demanding informed decisions. University ranking researchers and practitioners can access a detailed analysis of the THE-IR to determine its properties as a ranking and use raw data from THE-IR in other studies or reports. Policy makers can use the main findings of this work to avoid misinterpretations when developing public policies related to the evaluation of the contribution of universities to the SDGs. Otherwise, these results can help the ranking publisher to improve some of the inconsistencies found in this study.

    Social implications

    Given the global audience of the THE-IR, this work contributes to minimising the distorted vision that the THE-IR projects about sustainability in higher education institutions, and alerts governments, higher education bodies and policy makers to take precautions when making decisions based on this ranking.

    Originality/value

    To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this contribution is the first providing an analysis of the THE-IR’s methodology. The faults in the methodology, the coverage at the country-level and the overlap between THE-IR and THE-WUR have unveiled the existence of specific strategies in the participation of universities, of interest both for experts in university rankings and SDGs.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 41.
    Bautista-Puig, Núria
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Sanz-Casado, Elías
    University Carlos III of Madrid.
    Sustainability practices in Spanish higher education institutions: An overview of status and implementation2021In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 295, article id 126320Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Higher education institutions have been steadily progressing towards the integration of sustainable practices in their university system. Consequently, an increasing number of these institutions have recognized their responsibility and are incorporating sustainability into their operations, and practices, following a holistic approach. Despite these efforts in the implementation, there are still many challenges to pursue sustainability. In the Spanish framework, there is a lack of studies that investigate sustainable development in higher education by considering all the dimensions. Especially, the efforts of the Spanish Universities in research have been scarcely analysed in detail. This study analyze how Spanish Public and Private Universities (SUE) are integrating sustainability into their institutions by the following dimensions: Research (based on a search strategy proposed by considering the social, economic and environmental perspective); Internationalization (participation in GreenMetrics ranking and European Framework projects), University Governance (Strategic Plans); Assessment and Reporting (Sustainability Plans) and Campus Operations (Green offices).

    The findings reveal that some institutions present a higher production of scientific activity on the topic (e.g. UAB), while others with less production are more specialized (e.g. UA). The commitment of the universities has increased over time but it varies greatly among different kind of universities, especially in favour of the public institutions. By analyzing the correlation between sustainability practice, it was found that there are high association between some of the variables i.e. sustainability plan and having a green office. However, this study clearly demonstrates that although SD is recognized as being very important to HEIs and society, it is not yet embedded in the whole system’s strategies, activities, and policies.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 42.
    Berg, Frida
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management.
    Cindric, Emelina
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management.
    Norberg, Beatrice
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management.
    Företagsinkubatorers innovationsförmåga, att leva som man lär: en fallstudie vid Movexum2023Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 43. Bikfalvi, Andrea
    et al.
    Casadesus, Martí
    de Castro, Rodolfo
    Ferrer, Inés
    Fobbe, Lea
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Garcia-Romeu, Maria Luisa
    Marques, Pilar
    Applying strategic analysis for designing an educational program in smart manufacturing: the case of MIMS2023Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Boivie, Alfred
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management.
    Doorali, Violetta Tina
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management.
    Verktyg för effektivisering av ett patientflöde: I en privatklinik2023Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In healthcare patients move in a different pattern depending on what the specific patient needs to have done. This pattern is also called a flow, where the flow which this article mentions describes how the patient flows. To offer the best healthcare service, it is important that the patient flow is effective. That the flow being effective means to work towards a logistical, quality and cost-effective flow. This also matches the patient care given in private clinics, where similar patient flows can be seen. The purpose with this study is to identify what affects the patient flow and how the patient flow can be more efficient both quality wise and cost wise. 

     

    To answer the purpose this study performed a case study on a private clinic in the Stockholm area who work with cosmetic as well as reconstructive surgery. To follow a patient flow this study performed a flow mapping of a patient flow, the study also performed interviews with an employee of the private clinic. To collect information that supports this study's conclusion several previous articles were used along with information from literature and necessary internet websites.

     

    The study identifies capacity, information transparency and logistics as causes of inefficiency. This study comes to the conclusion that lean tools could be implemented in an organization whose operations are active in healthcare. Out of those tools presented in the analysis three different categories occur where the lean tools are placed. The different categories are planning tools, improvement tools and preventive measures. With the help of previous research where similar, if not the same tools were used, positive results could be seen with consequent results being empathized. This study comes to the conclusion that a combination of tools from the three different categories is the best alternative to ensure an improvement of the efficiency long term. Planning for the future, while improving existing waste and at the same time using tools that act as an aid towards future waste is the best way to improve efficiency on the patient flow long term. 

     

    Keywords: Lean, efficiency, improvement, healthcare, logistics, patient flow

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 45.
    Bulduk, Berivan
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management.
    Lundström, Nina
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management.
    Samberger, Sundos
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management.
    Säkerhetsarbete inom små företag: En Fallstudie på Duro Svenska Tapetmästare2023Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Safety within all business processes is an important part of organizations in order for them to function in the long term. Human wellbeing and health are fundamental for a company to be able to run a functioning business. Despite this, organizations can make wrong decisions in safety based on their interpretation of risks (Robinson et al., 2013). Fatalities and injuries in the process and manufacturing industries have decreased significantly over the past three decades. According to the Swedish Working Environment Agency (2021), the number of occupational accidents without sick absence has had a relatively stable increase in the Swedish workplace from 1980 - 2021 among both women and men. This may indicate that workplace safety is an area in need of more research and development. The purpose of this study is to investigate the risks of workplace accidents and safety management in a manufacturing company and to provide suggestions for improvement for a healthier working environment. The study was carried out through a qualitative and quantitative method in the form of interviews, observation and a survey. The result was compared with relevant theory on safety management. This study is limited to Duro Svenska Tapetmästare and the company's production, which includes paint production, wallpaper production and trimming of wallpaper rolls. Duro's current risk management and safety work is in the form of safety rounds, which means that all activities and spaces are continuously inspected to identify risks. Duro's safety management was found to have deficiencies in several areas within the production, which emerged from the FMEA analysis, the interviews, the survey and the observation. Deficiencies included running machinery, handrails at walkways and ventilation. In addition, ergonomic deficiencies, insufficient security rounds and a lack of safety and environmental policy were identified. The study concluded that there are several obstacles to increasing safety in the workplace. A research gap in safety management was identified because the company's management, decision-makers and employees believe that the safety work is sufficient even though our study shows that it is not. This perception constitutes an obstacle to further development of safety and also applies to the management's perception of the employees. Furthermore, the study has identified key factors that companies should take into account. Risk assessment methods such as FMEA and JHA contribute with an overview of the company's work processes and production because these methods include risk assessment in all production activities. This can be combined with more risk management tools which in turn provide the opportunity to identify, evaluate and remedy risks for a safer work environment.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 46.
    Burchardt, Mikaela
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management.
    Löfström, Sandra
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management.
    Employees’ Health in the Process Industry: The Impact of Lean2022Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The effects of implementing Lean has been widely studied within the context of discrete manufacturing, where it originated, but much less so within the process industry. Within discrete manufacturing there are major benefits to implementing Lean with a focus on respect for people and human aspects, particularly on employee health and organisational culture, but does the same hold true in the process industry? The purpose of this thesis is to look into this question. In order to do so, a case company within the process industry, which was working with a consultant firm to implement Lean, was contacted. The primary method of gathering data was through semi-structured interviews, further backed by KPIs provided by the case company. The data from the case company has been analysed and compared with theories and ideas gathered from literature, and then discussed. The results indicated that there had not been enough time to see the full extent of benefits or issues on employee health or organisational culture in relation to implementing Lean, only minor effects could be observed. However, better contact between employees, increased motivation, but also increased stress could be seen. In order to gain a broader understanding of the human aspects within the context of process industry while implementing Lean, future research could look at more long-term effects, or the generalisability through a quantitative approach.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 47.
    Cannava, Catharina
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management.
    Managing the bi-directional flow of materials to increase customer satisfaction and reduce cost: A case study at Sandvik Mining and Rock Technology2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This thesis explores the bi-directional flows of material perceived by manufacturing firms in the supply chain and accordingly derive suggestions to properly manage these flows to increase customer satisfaction and reduce cost.

    Methods: A literature review was summarized in a conceptual framework. This framework was then illustrated in a case. In this case, 11 semi-structured interviews, 3 participant observations and 3 types of archival records were collected. Analysis and discussion of the preliminary conceptual framework compared to the case was the basis for the modified conceptual framework that was designed.

    Main findings: In general material flows downstream the supply chain, but because of quality issues, recycling or returns material need to flow upstream the supply chain. This thesis provides a holistic view of how to manage these flows with a modified conceptual framework.

    Academic contributions: Previously, almost no academic research has been conducted on decision variables when it comes to managing material flows upstream the supply chain. This thesis contributes to closing this gap by suggesting different actions to properly manage the bi-directional flow of material. Furthermore, previous research addressing how to manage material flows has been re-accessed and expanded.

    Managerial implications: By using the framework, practitioners can determine helpful activities to increase customer satisfaction and reduce cost. This means management gets directions of where to allocate their resources.

    Limitations: The perspective and evidence in this research are only collected from the manufacturer’s point of view, valuable insight from suppliers and customers may have been overlooked. The suggestions of how to manage the bi-directional flow of materials have not been tested and the outcome of these recommendations has not been compared to KPIs or other measurements.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 48.
    Carlsson, Inga-Lill
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. Department of Management and Engineering, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Bengtsson, Lars
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Developing system supplier capability by integrating knowledge with customers2019In: International Journal of Logistics Systems and Management, ISSN 1742-7967, E-ISSN 1742-7975, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 91-109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As large corporations outsource parts of their manufacturing and services, many small and medium-sized enterprise (SME) suppliers are expected to deepen their capabilities and take on the role of system suppliers. The purpose of this paper is to analyse how knowledge integration with customers may help a SME develop system supplier capabilities. The study is based on a deep longitudinal case study of a SME manufacturer and focuses on continuous development capability as one of the core system supplier capabilities. The results show that knowledge integration (KI) with customers is an effective means to build system capability but that this is a stepwise process. The study identifies three levels of KI with customers: unidirectional knowledge transfer, mutual knowledge exchange and full-range knowledge integration. The analysis further indicates that each level of KI requires specific supplier capabilities.

  • 49.
    Carlsson, Lilly
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management.
    Langsager, Jeanette
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management.
    Implementering av DevOps: En fallstudie på ett IT-konsultföretag2021Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Within the field of project management different methods and agile approaches have emerged. However, dividing silo-structures have created frustration within software development. DevOps has surfaced as a way to address this and instead connect different functions such as development and operations. DevOps affects teams but there is no standardized approach for its implementation. Therefore, more research around the implementation process of DevOps is needed. Also, investigating what the accompanying effects could be, is of interest. The purpose of this thesis is to study the implementation of DevOps within the IT consultant industry and what impact it has on a team. This thesis was executed with abductive reasoning where a case study was carried out. To fulfill the purpose and answer the research questions literature review and interviews have been performed. Collected theory and empirical material have been discussed and analyzed in order to formulate conclusions and recommendations.  One formulated conclusion is that each implementation of DevOps needs to follow its own adapted execution where the aim and essence are clarified. Factors regarding communication, automation, responsibility, willingness to change and collaboration also impact the implementation and the effects experienced by the team. It can also be concluded that both benefits and limitations can affect the team yet, the disadvantages often appear to be contained within the start of the implementation. A practical contribution comes from recommendations for the implementation, such as having a dedicated person and education within DevOps among others.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 50.
    Carpenter, Angela
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Lozano, RodrigoUniversity of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    European port cities in transition: Moving towards more sustainable sea transport hubs2020Collection (editor) (Other academic)
1234567 1 - 50 of 307
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard-cite-them-right
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • sv-SE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • de-DE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf