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  • 1.
    Nyström, Anita
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Teamtraining in Swedish hospitals2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to survey the occurrence of, and obstacles of team training in neonatal life support in Swedish hospitals and to compare university hospitals with other hospitals about the occurrence of, and obstacles of training. The study was directed to all the managers in 37 pediatric wards and data was collected by telephone interviews with aid of a questionnaire. The results showed that 81 % of the Swedish hospitals which has a pediatric ward train the staff in neonatal life support. All of the university hospitals and 74 % of the other hospitals are running training in some form. The methods of training varied and so did the occurrence of training. All the managers’ thought it was important to train neonatal life support. There did not emerge any statistically significant difference between university hospitals and other hospitals concerning the methods of training, evaluation of training or in possibilities and obstacles of training. The conclusions are that training multidisciplinary teams in neonatal life support is going on in most of the Swedish hospitals. The team training in neonatal life support is a quite new method inSweden and several hospitals has started the training this year. Only one third is evaluating their training and that is done twice as often as oral reports compared to written reports. Another conclusion is that there must be a serious discussion about the certification for the professionals who are involved in neonatal life support.

  • 2.
    Nyström, Anita
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Department of Caring Sciences and Sociology, Ämnesavdelningen för vårdvetenskap.
    Pålsson, Ylva
    University of Gävle, Department of Caring Sciences and Sociology, Ämnesavdelningen för vårdvetenskap.
    Self-efficacy improved after neonatal resuscitation teamtraining2009In: Self-efficacy improved after neonatal resuscitation teamtraining, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Handling neonatal resuscitation requires optimal team functioning. A team must be composed of individuals who have specifically assigned roles and responsibilities. Each team member should acknowledge the role of the other team members, communicate respectfully, and recognize the leader's role (1).Systematic training in simulation of realistic situations can contribute to that the multi-disciplinary team maintains and improves their competence and quality of treatment in critical situations (2).

    Training scenarios coupled with debriefings provide rich learning experiences for all the team members who are involved in neonatal resuscitation (3).

    The purpose of this study was to examine how the staff considered the teamwork in neonatal resuscitation at a small Swedish hospital and if it existed any differences between they who had participated in simulator-based training. The study was directed to all the staff involved in the neonatal resuscitation team, i.e. pediatricians, obstetricians, anaesthetists, midwives and nurses who works in a NICU.

    A questionnaire was distributed to a total of 92 staff members with a response tale of 61% (n=56). Two groups were identified, one who has implemented simulator-based training and one who hadn't. The result showed that they who had participated in simulator-based team training in neonatal resuscitation:

    - are more prepared for neonatal resuscitation situations.-   have greater opportunity to influence decisions, -   other team members took advantage of their skills, -   had greater knowledge of what is required of them in an neonatal resuscitation situation.

    Neonatal resuscitation is one of the classic low-frequency, high risk event that lends itself well to simulator-based training (3).   In a smaller hospital the neonatal resuscitation is infrequent but parents still expect optimal treatment. To participate in the rarely recurring situations require not only skills and knowledge but also the ability to work in a team. It is both an organizational, educational and medical challenge to keep the medical safety in resuscitation situations, especially because they are infrequent (2).The authors believe that it is a need to develop better methods to evaluate the impact of simulator training.

  • 3.
    Nyström, Anita
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Pålsson, Ylva
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Hofsten, Anna
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Häggström, Elisabeth
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Bachelor nursing students' experiences of being video-recorded during examination in a simulated emergency care situation2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Nyström, Anita
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Pålsson, Ylva
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Hofsten, Anna
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Häggström, Elisabeth
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Nursing students' experiences of being video-recorded during examination in a fictive emergency care situation2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract

    Promoting bachelor nursing students’ learning in fictive care can be achieved through dynamic

    scenario-based training sessions that are documented using simple video equipment. One

    valuable aspect of this kind of training is the subsequent reflective dialogue that takes place

    between the teacher and the students.

    The aim of the present paper is to describe bachelor nursing students’ experiences of being videorecorded

    during an examination with a fictive patient in emergency care.

    The study was descriptive in design and used a qualitative approach with written answers to

    open-ended questions; 44 bachelor nursing students participated.

    A latent content analysis resulted in three themes: (1)

    Visualization may cause nervousness at

    first,

    (2) Visualization promotes dialogue and acknowledgement, and (3) Visualization promotes

    increased self-knowledge and professional growth.

    The conclusion is that video-recording is a good way for bachelor nursing students to develop

    skills in emergency care situations and to understand their own actions; it may also help them

    increase their self-knowledge

  • 5.
    Nyström, Anita
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science.
    Pålsson, Ylva
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science.
    Hofsten, Anna
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science. Uppsala universitet.
    Häggström, Elisabeth
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science. Uppsala universitet.
    Nursing students' experiences of being video-recorded during examination in a fictive emergency care situation2014In: International Journal of Nursing Practice, ISSN 1322-7114, E-ISSN 1440-172X, Vol. 20, no 5, 540-548 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Promoting bachelor nursing students’ learning in simulated care can be achieved through dynamic scenario-based training sessions that are documented using simple video equipment. One valuable aspect of this kind of training is the subsequent reflective dialogue that takes place between the teacher and the students during the examination.

    Aim: The aim of the present paper is to describe bachelor nursing students’ experiences of being video-recorded during an examination with a simulated patient in emergency care.

    Method: The study was descriptive in design and used a qualitative approach with written answers to open-ended questions; 44 bachelor nursing students participated.

    Results: A latent content analysis resulted in three themes: (1) Visualization may cause nervousness at first, (2) Visualization promotes dialogue and acknowledgement, and (3) Visualization promotes increased self-knowledge and professional growth.

    Conclusion: The conclusion is that video-recording is a good way for bachelor nursing students to develop skills in emergency care situations and to understand their own actions; it may also help them increase their self-knowledge.  

  • 6.
    Nyström, Anita
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Pålsson, Ylva
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Hofsten, Anna
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Häggström, Elisabeth
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Undergraduate nursing students experiences of beeing video-recorded during examination in a simulated emergency care situation2013Conference paper (Refereed)
1 - 6 of 6
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