hig.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 5 of 5
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard-cite-them-right
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • sv-SE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • de-DE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Krishnan, Rakesh
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electrical Engineering, Mathematics and Science, Electronics. Robotics, Perception and Learning, School of Computer Science and Communication, KTH - Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden; BioMEx Center, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Björsell, Niclas
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electrical Engineering, Mathematics and Science, Electronics.
    Gutierrez-Farewik, Elena
    KTH Engineering Sciences, Mechanics, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm, Sweden; BioMEx Center, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm, Sweden .
    Smith, Christian
    Robotics, Perception and Learning, School of Computer Science and Communication, KTH - Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden; BioMEx Center, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm, Sweden.
    A survey of human shoulder functional kinematic representations2019In: Medical and Biological Engineering and Computing, ISSN 0140-0118, E-ISSN 1741-0444, Vol. 57, no 2, p. 339-367Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this survey, we review the field of human shoulder functional kinematic representations. The central question of this review is to evaluate whether the current approaches in shoulder kinematics can meet the high-reliability computational challenge. This challenge is posed by applications such as robot-assisted rehabilitation. Currently, the role of kinematic representations in such applications has been mostly overlooked. Therefore, we have systematically searched and summarised the existing literature on shoulder kinematics. The shoulder is an important functional joint, and its large range of motion (ROM) poses several mathematical and practical challenges. Frequently, in kinematic analysis, the role of the shoulder articulation is approximated to a ball-and-socket joint. Following the high-reliability computational challenge, our review challenges this inappropriate use of reductionism. Therefore, we propose that this challenge could be met by kinematic representations, that are redundant, that use an active interpretation and that emphasise on functional understanding.

  • 2.
    Krishnan, Rakesh
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electronics, Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Electronics. Robotics, Perception and Learning, School of Computer Science and Communication, KTH - Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Björsell, Niclas
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electronics, Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Electronics.
    Smith, Christian
    Robotics, Perception and Learning, School of Computer Science and Communication, KTH - Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    How do we plan movements?: A geometric answer2016In: School and symposium on advanced neurorehabilitation (SSNR2016): Proceedings, 2016, , p. 2p. 16-17Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Human movement is essentially a complex phenomenon. When humans work closely with robots, understanding human motion using robot’s sensors is a very challenging problem. This is partially due to the lack of proper consensus among researchers on which representation to use in such situations. This extended abstract presents a novel kinematic framework to study human intention using hybrid twists. Thisis important as the functional aspects of the human shoulder are evaluated using the information embedded in thoraco-humeral kinematics. We successfully demonstrate that our approach is singularity free. We also demonstrate that how the twis tparameters vary according to the movement being performed.

  • 3.
    Krishnan, Rakesh
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electronics, Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Electronics. Robotics, Perception and Learning, School of Computer Science and Communication, KTH - Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Björsell, Niclas
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electronics, Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Electronics.
    Smith, Christian
    Robotics, Perception and Learning, School of Computer Science and Communication, KTH - Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Human shoulder functional kinematics: Are we ready for the high-reliability computational challenge?2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In  this  preview  talk,  I  will  present  a  short  summary  of  our  ongoing  work  related  to  human shoulder functional kinematics.  Robot-assisted rehabilitation needs functional understanding of human kinematics in design, operation and evaluation of this technology. Human shoulder is an important  functional  joint  that  enables  fine  motor  skills  for  human  upper  arm  manipulation. Due  to  several  mathematical  and  practical  challenges,  the  shoulder  kinematics  is  often oversimplified. Moreover, there is a lack of agreement among different research communities on  the  suitable  kinematic  representation  when  connecting  humans  to  robots.  Currently,  it  is expected  that  this  computational  structure  used  in  such  applications  have  high-reliability. Therefore,  we  pose  the  question:  Are  we  ready  for  the  high-reliability  computational challenge?

  • 4.
    Krishnan, Rakesh
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electronics, Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Electronics. Computer Vision and Active Perception Lab, School of Computer Science and Communication, KTH - Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Björsell, Niclas
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electronics, Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Electronics.
    Smith, Christian
    Computer Vision and Active Perception Lab, School of Computer Science and Communication, KTH- Royal Institute of Technology.
    Invariant Spatial Parametrization of Human Thoracohumeral Kinematics: A Feasibility Study2016In: 2016 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS), IEEE Robotics and Automation Society, 2016, p. 4469-4476, article id 7759658Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we present a novel kinematic framework using hybrid twists, that has the potential to improve the reliability of estimated human shoulderkinematics. This is important as the functional aspects ofthe human shoulder are evaluated using the information embedded in thoracohumeral kinematics. We successfully demonstrate in our results, that our approach is invariant of the body-fixed coordinate definition, is singularity free and has high repeatability; thus resulting in a flexible user-specific kinematic tracking not restricted to bony landmarks.

  • 5.
    Krishnan, Rakesh
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electronics, Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Electronics. Robotics, Perception and Learning, School of Computer Science and Communication, KTH - Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Björsell, Niclas
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electronics, Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Electronics.
    Smith, Christian
    Robotics, Perception and Learning, School of Computer Science and Communication, KTH - Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Segmenting humeral submovements using invariant geometric signatures2017In: 2017 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (Iros) / [ed] Bicchi, A., Okamura, A., IEEE, 2017, p. 6951-6958, article id 8206619Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Discrete submovements are the building blocks of any complex movement. When robots collaborate with humans, extraction of such submovements can bevery helpful in applications such as robot-assisted rehabilitation. Our work aims to segment these submovements based on the invariant geometric information embedded in segment kinematics. Moreover, this segmentation is achieved without any explicit kinematic representation.Our work demonstrates the usefulness of this invariant framework in segmenting a variety of humeral movements, which are performed at different speeds across different subjects. Our results indicate that this invariant framework has high computational reliability despite the inherent variability in human motion.

1 - 5 of 5
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard-cite-them-right
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • sv-SE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • de-DE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf