hig.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 8 of 8
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard-cite-them-right
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • sv-SE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • de-DE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Hallin, Karin
    et al.
    Avdelningen för omvårdnad, Mittuniversitetet, Sundsvall.
    Bäckström, Britt
    Avdelningen för omvårdnad, Mittuniversitetet, Sundsvall.
    Häggström, Marie
    Avdelningen för omvårdnad, Mittuniversitetet, Sundsvall.
    Kristiansen, Lisbeth
    Avdelningen för omvårdnad, Mittuniversitetet, Sundsvall.
    High-fidelity simulation: Assessment of student nurses' team achievements of clinical judgment2016In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 19, p. 12-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nursing educators have the challenge of preparing nursing students to handle complex patient care situations in real life, but much remains unknown about the ability to make clinical judgments. In this study, high-fidelity simulation (HFS) was used at a Swedish university to find answers about pre-licensure nursing students' success in clinical judgment in terms of team ability and relationships with theoretical achievements, and personal and scenario circumstances. The matrix Lasater Clinical Judgment Rubric (LCJR) was used to analyze and score the students' ability in teams to notice, interpret and respond to complex care situations. Overall, the results showed the student teams in their first meeting with HFS in a complex care situation achieved low clinical judgment points; most teams were in the stages of Beginning and Developing. For attaining high team achievements the majority of the students in the team should theoretically be "high performance". Being observers and having HFS experience before nursing education was significant too. However, age, health care experience, and assistant nurse degrees were of secondary importance. Further research at universities regionally, nationally, and internationally is needed.

  • 2.
    Hallin, Karin
    et al.
    Avdelningen för omvårdnad, Mittuniversitetet, Sundsvall.
    Häggström, Marie
    Avdelningen för omvårdnad, Mittuniversitetet, Sundsvall.
    Bäckström, Britt
    Avdelningen för omvårdnad, Mittuniversitetet, Sundsvall.
    Kristiansen, Lisbeth
    Avdelningen för omvårdnad, Mittuniversitetet, Sundsvall.
    Correlations between Clinical Judgement and Learning Style Preferences of Nursing Students in the Simulation Room2016In: Global Journal of Health Science, ISSN 1916-9736, E-ISSN 1916-9744, Vol. 8, no 6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Health care educators account for variables affecting patient safety and are responsible for developing the highly complex process of education planning. Clinical judgement is a multidimensional process, which may be affected by learning styles. The aim was to explore three specific hypotheses to test correlations between nursing students’ team achievements in clinical judgement and emotional, sociological and physiological learning style preferences.

    METHODS: A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted with Swedish university nursing students in 2012-2013. Convenience sampling was used with 60 teams with 173 nursing students in the final semester of a three-year Bachelor of Science in nursing programme. Data collection included questionnaires of personal characteristics, learning style preferences, determined by the Dunn and Dunn Productivity Environmental Preference Survey, and videotaped complex nursing simulation scenarios. Comparison with Lasater Clinical Judgement Rubric and Non-parametric analyses were performed.

    RESULTS: Three significant correlations were found between the team achievements and the students’ learning style preferences: significant negative correlation with ‘Structure’ and ‘Kinesthetic’ at the individual level, and positive correlation with the ‘Tactile’ variable. No significant correlations with students’ ‘Motivation’, ‘Persistence’, ‘Wish to learn alone’ and ‘Wish for an authoritative person present’ were seen.

    DISCUSSION & CONCLUSION: There were multiple complex interactions between the tested learning style preferences and the team achievements of clinical judgement in the simulation room, which provides important information for the becoming nurses. Several factors may have influenced the results that should be acknowledged when designing further research. We suggest conducting mixed methods to determine further relationships between team achievements, learning style preferences, cognitive learning outcomes and group processes.

  • 3.
    Häggström, Marie
    et al.
    Institutionen för hälsovetenskap, Mittuniversitetet, Sundsvall.
    Asplund, Kenneth
    Institutionen för hälsovetenskap, Mittuniversitetet, Sundsvall.
    Kristiansen, Lisbeth
    Institutionen för hälsovetenskap, Mittuniversitetet, Sundsvall.
    How can nurses facilitate patient’s transitions from intensive care?: A grounded theory of nursing2012In: Intensive & Critical Care Nursing, ISSN 0964-3397, E-ISSN 1532-4036, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 224-233Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Intensive care patients often experience feelings of powerlessness and vulnerability when being transferred from an intensive care unit to a general ward. The aim of this study was to develop a grounded theory of nurses care for patients in the ICU transitional care process.

    Methods: Group interviews, individual interviews and participant observations were conducted with nurses in two hospitals in Sweden and were analysed using grounded theory.

    Result: The substantive theory shows the process of nursing care activities — from the contexts of the ICU and the general ward. The main concern was to achieve a coordinated, strengthening, person-centered standard of care to facilitate patient transitions. The core category ‘‘being perceptive and adjustable’’ was a strategy to individualise, that was related to the other categories; ‘‘preparing for a change’’ and ‘‘promoting the recovery’’. However, the nurses were forced to ‘‘balance between patient needs and the caregivers’ resources’’ and consequently were compromising their care.

    Conclusions: To facilitate an ICU-patient’s transition, individual care planning is needed. It is also essential that the patients are adequately prepared for the change to facilitate the transitional care. Knowledge about transitional needs, empowerment and patient-education seems to be important issues for facilitating transitions.

  • 4.
    Häggström, Marie
    et al.
    Avdelningen för omvårdnad, Mittuniversitetet, Sundsvall.
    Asplund, Kenneth
    Avdelningen för omvårdnad, Mittuniversitetet, Sundsvall.
    Kristiansen, Lisbeth
    Avdelningen för omvårdnad, Mittuniversitetet, Sundsvall.
    Important quality aspects in transfer process2014In: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, ISSN 0952-6862, E-ISSN 1758-6542, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 123-139Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Admission to and transfer from an intensive care unit affects not only the patient but also his or her relatives. The authors aimed to investigate relatives' perceptions of quality of care during a patient's transfer process from an intensive care unit to a general ward. Design/methodology/approach: The study had a mixed method design that included quantitative data and answers to open questions. The participants were 65 relatives of patients who received care in an ICU. They were recruited from two hospitals in Sweden. Findings: A majority perceived the transfer process as important, but analysis also showed that the participants rated it as an area for improvements. The relatives wanted participation, personal insight and control, respectful encounters, proximity, reassurance, continuous quality, reconnection and feedback. The relatives' participation in the transfer process was perceived as inadequate by 61 per cent, and the support that was received after the ICU discharge was perceived as inadequate by 53 per cent. The patients' length of stay in the ICU affected the relatives' perceptions of the quality of care. Overall, the relatives seemed to desire that the transfer process includes a continuous care, a competent staff, available information throughout the transfer process and personal involvement in the care, both before and after the transfer from the ICU. Research limitations/implications: The conclusion of this study is that relatives' needs and seeking for a well-planned ICU transitional process organisation with continuous quality before and after transfer, informational strategies that encourage the relatives to be involved and an organisation with competence throughout the healthcare chain are vital for quality. Practical implications: The conclusion of this study is that relatives' needs and seeking for a well-planned ICU transitional process organisation with continuous quality before and after transfer, informational strategies that encourage the relatives to be involved and an organisation with competence throughout the healthcare chain are vital for quality. Originality/value: The findings have important implications for nursing and nursing management. A relative's perception of the quality of care before and after transfer from ICU may be a valuable source to evaluate the ICU transitional care.

  • 5.
    Häggström, Marie
    et al.
    Institutionen för hälsovetenskap, Mittuniversitetet, Sundsvall.
    Asplund, Kenneth
    Institutionen för hälsovetenskap, Mittuniversitetet, Sundsvall.
    Kristiansen, Lisbeth
    Institutionen för hälsovetenskap, Mittuniversitetet, Sundsvall.
    Struggle with a gap between intensive care units and general wards2009In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 181-192Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nursing critically ill patients includes planning and performing safe discharges from Intensive Care Units (ICU) to the general wards. The aim of this study was to obtain a deeper understanding of the main concern in the ICU transitional process-the care before, during, and after the transfer of ICU patients. Interviews were conducted with 35 Swedish nurses and analysed according to grounded theory. The main concern was the nurses' "struggling with a gap." The "gap" was caused by differences in the altered level of care and contributed to difficulties for nurses encountering an overlap during the transitional care. The categories: Sheltering, seeking organizational intertwining and striving for control are related to the core category and were used to generate a theory. The nurses sought improved collaboration, and employed patient-centred routines. They wanted access to necessary tools; they relayed or questioned their own competence and sought assurance of the patients' ability to be transferred. If the nurses felt a loss of control, lack of intertwining and lack of collaboration, they sheltered their patients and themselves. Intertwining was more difficult to perform, but actually even more important to do. With knowledge about ICU transitional care, collaboration, routines, and with an organization that provides an educational environment, the process could be improved.

  • 6.
    Häggström, Marie
    et al.
    Avdelningen för omvårdnad, Mittuniversitetet, Sundsvall.
    Asplund, Kenneth
    Avdelningen för omvårdnad, Mittuniversitetet, Sundsvall.
    Kristiansen, Lisbeth
    Avdelningen för omvårdnad, Mittuniversitetet, Sundsvall.
    To reduce technology prior discharge from intensive care –important but difficult?: A grounded theory2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 506-515Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim of this study was to provide a deeper understanding of the experience of intensive care staff regarding the reduction in the use of medical technology prior to patients’ transfer from the ICU.

    Background: The goal of ICU transitional care, provided for intensive care patients before, during and after the transfer from the ICU to another care unit, is to ensure minimal disruption and optimal continuity of care for the patient. To smooth this transition, there is a need to prepare for a less technological environment and therefore also a need for a gradual reduction in the use of monitoring equipment.

    Method: Group interviews and individual interviews, together with participant observations, were conducted with ICU staff in two hospitals in Sweden. The data were analysed using classic grounded theory.

    Results: The main concern was the ICU staff’s ambiguity regarding whether and how to reduce the use of medical technology devices. Insecurity about weaning patients from medical equipment combined with a lack of standardized routines made it difficult for staff to reduce the technical support. The core category describes how the ambiguity was solved primarily by ’prioritizing control’. However, this often caused the ICU staff to use advanced technology while the patients were in the ICU until the ward staff arrived, even if this should have been handled otherwise. Why and how the ICU staff used the strategy of ’prioritizing control’ is further explained in the categories ’being affected by cultural/contextual aspects’, ’searching for guidance and a shared understanding’ and ’weighing advantages with more v s less technology’.

    Conclusion: It is important to consider ICU staff ambiguity concerning the reduction in technology and to establish strategies for a safe and structured transitional phase with step-down procedures in which technology and monitoring is gradually reduced prior to transfer from ICU.

  • 7.
    Kristiansen, Lisbeth
    et al.
    Avdelningen för omvårdnad, Mittuniversitetet, Sundsvall.
    Häggström, Marie
    Avdelningen för omvårdnad, Mittuniversitetet, Sundsvall.
    Hallin, Karin
    Avdelningen för omvårdnad, Mittuniversitetet, Sundsvall.
    Andersson, Ingela
    Bäckström, Britt
    Avdelningen för omvårdnad, Mittuniversitetet, Sundsvall.
    Svensk översättning, kvalitativ relevansvärdering och kvantitativ reliabilitetstestning av Lasater Clinical Judgment Rubric: Swedish translation, qualitative relevance evaluation and quantitative reliability test of Lasater Clinical Judgment Rubric 2015In: Nordic journal of nursing research, ISSN 2057-1585, E-ISSN 2057-1593, Vol. 35, no 2, p. 113-122Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Newly graduated nurses show lacking skills and competences regarding the ability to make appropriate clinical assessment of acute, complex care situations. There is also a lack of translated, qualitative relevance evaluated and reliability tested rubrics in the Swedish language. The purpose of this method article was to translate, conduct a relevance evaluation and reliability test of the identified Lasater Clinical Judgment Rubric (LCJR). In this article the Swedish translation LCJR (S) is presented. The results showed that the LCJR (S) was both  qualitatively relevant and quantitatively reliable. We claim that there are several advantages to systematic use LCJR (S) for assessment of nursing students' clinical judgment in laboratory simulation environments with acute patient situations

  • 8.
    Rising Holmström, Malin
    et al.
    Avdelningen för omvårdnad, Mittuniversitetet, Sundsvall.
    Marie, Häggström
    Avdelningen för omvårdnad, Mittuniversitetet, Sundsvall.
    Kristiansen, Lisbeth
    Avdelningen för omvårdnad, Mittuniversitetet, Sundsvall.
    Skolsköterskans rolltransformering till den nya hälsofrämjande positionen [The transformation of the school nurse’s role towards the new health-promoting position]2015In: Nordic journal of nursing research, ISSN 2057-1585, E-ISSN 2057-1593, Vol. 35, no 4, p. 210-217Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim The aim of this study was to describe the role transformation of school nurses towards primary health promotion, and secondary preventive and health treatment work.Background According to the Swedish educational act, the school nurse profession has changed towards being mainly health promotion and secondary preventive and health treatment work.Method The study consisted of a qualitative study design with content analysis inspired by Elo and Kyngäs. Sixteen individual interviews were conducted with school nurses from across one county.Findings The role transformation towards a more health promotion was described by school nurses' statements. The process of the transformation differed among the school nurses. Three categories illuminated their work; professional approach, student-centred and collaboration.Conclusion The role transformation process required enhanced relation and communicational skills. Structured collegial supervision might support the process.

1 - 8 of 8
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard-cite-them-right
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • sv-SE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • de-DE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf